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Guatemala City

Men burn a paper figure of Ivan Velasquez, the commissioner of the United Nations International Commission Against Impunity, CICIG, celebrating outside the mission's headquarters which on this day ends its 12-year mission, in Guatemala City. CICIG is closing its operation after 12 years. It brought to trial three former presidents and hundreds of businessmen, officials, judges and individuals accused of corruption.

AP/PTI

A hooded agronomy student protests outside the hotel where lawmakers are gathered and expected to vote on a deal that Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales' government signed with Washington that would force Salvadoran and Honduran migrants to request asylum in Guatemala instead of the United States, in Guatemala City. Critics of the deal point out that Guatemala has the same problems that are driving Hondurans and Salvadorans to flee their homes: violence, poverty, joblessness and a prolonged drought that has severely hurt farmers.

AP Photo/Oliver de Ros

Carmen Cumes, left, and Rosalina Tuyuc, of the National Coordination of Guatemalan Widows (CONAVIGUA), sit surrounded by portraits of people who are disappeared as a form of protest outside Congress in Guatemala City. Lawmakers postponed the approval of a controversial bill that could give amnesty to the perpetrators of war crimes dating back to the country's bloody civil war.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Activists perform during a rally to mark International Women's Day in Guatemala City. During the march people remembered 41 girls that died in a fire two years ago at the state-run Virgen de la Asuncion youth shelter.

AP Photo/ Oliver de Ros

A boy in costume clutching a Guatemalan flag sits outside a local fast food restaurant as he waits with his father for a march to start against Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales and corruption in Guatemala City.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Demonstrators gather at Constitution Square to protest Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales and rally in support of the fight against corruption in Guatemala City. Thousands marched to protest Morales' decision to end the work of a U.N. anti-corruption commission that has helped lead high-profile graft probes targeting dozens of powerful people, including one involving Morales.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

People gather at the Plaza de la Constitucion in Guatemala City at the end of an anti-abortion march. The march was in support of a new bill that expands the criminalization of abortion and could subject women who have miscarriages to prosecution. The proposed legislation has been approved twice by Congress and needs a third approval.

AP Photo/Santiago Billy

Firecrackers go off as a supporter in favor of a decision by Guatemala's President Jimmy Morales to shut down a U.N.-sponsored anti-graft commission led by Ivan Velasquez, protests outside the United Nations International Commission Against Impunity, CICIG, headquarters in Guatemala City.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

People protest against a decision by Guatemala's President Jimmy Morales to shut down the United Nations International Commission Against Impunity, CICIG, at Constitution Square in Guatemala City. .

AP Photo/Oliver de Ros

People protest against a decision by Guatemala's President Jimmy Morales to shut down the United Nations International Commission Against Impunity, CICIG, at Constitution Square in Guatemala City. Last week the Supreme Court allowed a request brought by the CICIG and Guatemalan prosecutors to strip Morales' immunity from prosecution to go to Congress for consideration.

AP Photo/Oliver de Ros

People burn an effigy of Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales during a protest against a decision by Morales to shut down the United Nations International Commission Against Impunity, CICIG, at Constitution Square in Guatemala City. Morales announced that he is shutting down the commission that pressed a number of high-profile corruption probes, including one pending against the president himself over purported illicit campaign financing.

AP Photo/Oliver de Ros

Stuffed toy animals wrapped in aluminum foil representing migrant children separated from their families are displayed in protest in front of the United States embassy in Guatemala City. Bowing to pressure from anxious allies, President Donald Trump abruptly reversed himself and signed an executive order halting his administration’s policy of separating children from their parents when they are detained illegally crossing the U.S. border.

AP Photo/Luis Soto

Soldiers return to their barracks after attending a ceremony marking the withdrawal of the Army from day-to-day law enforcement duties in Guatemala City. Guatemala's President Jimmy Morales announced in March he would withdraw troops from the streets nationwide following accusations that soldiers were involved in corruption and criminal activities. The army had taken on policing duties, alongside the police, for the past 18 years.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Mayan priests gather for a ceremony to mark the 21st anniversary of 1996 peace accords that ended Guatemala's civil war at the Kaminal Juyu archeological site in Guatemala City. During the 36-year civil war, about 200,000 people were killed, mostly by state forces and paramilitary groups.

AP/ PTI

Protestors chant against Congressman Fernando Montenegro as he enters Congress in Guatemala City. Congress has called an extraordinary session to discuss approved legislation that reduces punishments for illegal campaign financing and opens the possibility of replacing up to 10 year prison sentences with fines.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Demonstrators gather outside the National Palace after passing a security line of army police to protest a new penal law approved by Congress in Guatemala City.

AP/PTI Photo

A protestor chants anti-government slogans at Congress, in Guatemala City. Several protests emerged against Guatemala's Congress after it approved legislation reducing the punishment for campaign-finance crimes, two days after blocking prosecutors and a U.N. anti-corruption commission from investigating President Jimmy Morales for alleged irregularities during the election that brought him to office.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

A poster with number "105," in reference to the votes needed in Congress to lift Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales' immunity, hangs on a wall outside Congress, in Guatemala City. Lawmakers voted against lifting the president's immunity from prosecution, hours after a congressional commission recommended the protection be withdrawn to open the way for a possible trial on campaign-finance accusations.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Activist Andrea Ixchiu holds an effigy of Guatemala's President Jimmy Morales and shouts slogans in support of Ivan Velasquez, chief of a U.N. anti-corruption commission, in the middle of an altar honoring dozens of girls who died in a fire at a children's home this year, in the Central Plaza of Guatemala City. Morales ordered Velasquez to leave the country after he and Guatemala's attorney general called for the removal of the president's immunity from prosecution, so they can pursue an investigation into alleged campaign finance violations.

AP Photo/Luis Soto

Mexico's ex-governor of Veracruz state, Javier Duarte, is escorted in handcuffs by police to an aircraft as he is extradited to Mexico City, at an Air Force base in Guatemala City. Duarte faces charges of embezzlement and ties to organized crime in his home country.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Young men who were serving time inside the Juvenile Correctional Center "Gaviotas" when a riot broke out the previous day stand inside a shared cell inside a courtroom where they will be read the charges against them by a judge in Guatemala City. Monday's riot began when two inmates were found dead, hanging in an apparent suicide, according to authorities. Apart from the two dead, 10 inmates were reported to have escaped from the center, of whom six were recaptured.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

A juvenile inmate is attended by a medic and interrogated by a police officer, after he was injured during the recapture of the Juvenile Correctional Center Gaviotas by police, in Guatemala City.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Police officers escort recaptured inmates of the Juvenile Correctional Center Gaviotas in Guatemala City. A riot at the center began when two inmates were found hanging in an apparent suicide, according to authorities. Apart from the two dead, 10 other inmates are reported to have escaped from the center.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

A woman and child walk past chairs with text from poems written by writer Luis Lion, who was "disappeared" in 1984, during a march in memory of those who were "disappeared" during the Guatemalan civil war, in Guatemala City. As Guatemala celebrated Army Day, many marched in remembrance of the hundreds of thousands who died in the decades long civil war.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Revelers take part in the annual gay pride parade in Guatemala City's historical center.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Chairs bearing portraits of people who were disappeared during the 1980's, sit empty in a ceremony marking the National Day of the Disappeared in Guatemala City. According to human rights groups, more than 40,000 people were "disappeared" during Guatemala's 36 years of internal conflict.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

People hold a candlelight vigil outside the National Palace in remembrance of the girls who died in a fire at the Virgin of the Assumption Safe Home in Guatemala City. A blaze, that killed at least 35 girls at a shelter for troubled youths, erupted when some of them set fire to mattresses to protest rapes and other mistreatment at the badly overcrowded institution, the parent of one victim said.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

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