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Arundhati Roy

Author Arundhati Roy celebrates Eid with Kashmiri students who could not reach their families in the wake of abrogation of Article 370 in the state of Jammu and Kashmir, in New Delhi.

PTI Photo/Ravi Choudhary

In this file photo, (From Left) Outlook Editor-in-Chief Vinod Mehta, writer Arundhati Roy, playwright and actor Girish Karnad and writer Mahasweta Devi during a press conference of the Forum for the Protection of Free Speech and Expression in support of Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasreen in New Delhi.

PTI Photo

Vroom vroom, ­coming in for a hug. Arundhati Roy ­celebrated her 1997 Booker Prize win with a mildly ­enthusiastic Pradip Krishen in London.

Photograph by Gauri Gill

Writer and activist Arundhati Roy (R) and senior advocate Prashant Bhushan, addresses at a press conference on the recent crackdown on rights activists, in New Delhi.

Photo by Tribhuvan Tiwari/Outlook

Novelist Arundhati Roy presents her book "The Ministry of Utmost Happiness" at the Parco della Musica Auditorium, in Rome.

Giorgio OnoratiANSA via AP

Photograph by Tribhuvan Tiwari

Fans besotted with The God of Small Things have harried Arundhati Roy on her next novel for almost two decades. This week came the good news—The Ministry of Utmost Happiness, her second novel, will be out next year.

Photograph by Narendra Bisht

Writer and activist Arundhati Roy right, talks to a student during a march to the parliament house, in New Delhi. The march was against the alleged interference of government in the universities and to demand the release of Delhi’s Jawaharlal Nehru University students who were arrested along with their union president last month for sedition charges.

AP Photo/Manish Swarup

Author Arundhati Roy and NCP leader Chhagan Bujbal paying tribute to the statues of late Mahatma Phule and his wife at an award ceremony, in Pune.

PTI Photo

Room 1001, Ritz Carlton, Moscow: Edward Snowden’s exiled quarters where actor-writer John Cusack brings Arundhati and Dan Ellsberg to meet him

Ole Von Uexküll

Social activist Arundhati Roy with FTII students during their protest march from Mandi House to Jantar Manter for the removal of the FTII Chairman Gajendra Chauhan, in New Delhi.

PTI Photo/Vijay Verma

Mothers Narmada all Out here, it’s the women who carry the struggle

AP

Arundhati Roy, author and political activist who is best known for the 1998 Man Booker Prize for Fiction-winning novel The God of Small Things (1997) and for her involvement in environmental and human rights causes at her residence in New Delhi

Narendra Bisht

Author Arundhati Roy and Justice Leila Seth, first woman judge on the Delhi High Court, at the launch of Vinod Mehta's book, Editor Unplugged in New Delhi.

Photo by Sanjay Rawat/ Outlook

Indian author Arundhati Roy and founder editor-in-chief of Outlook Vinod Mehta's Wife at the launch of Vinod Mehta's book, Editor Unplugged, in New Delhi.

Photo by Sanjay Rawat/ Outlook

Author Arundhati Roy and Publisher at Penguin Books India Chiki Sarkar at the launch of Vinod Mehta's book, Editor Unplugged, in New Delhi.

Photo by Sanjay Rawat/ Outlook

Author Arundhati Roy at the launch of Vinod Mehta's book, Editor Unplugged, in New Delhi.

Photo by Sanjay Rawat/ Outlook

Author Arundhati Roy at the launch of Vinod Mehta's book, Editor Unplugged, in New Delhi.

Photo by Sanjay Rawat/ Outlook

Author Arundhati Roy at the launch of Vinod Mehta's book, Editor Unplugged, in New Delhi.

Photo by Sanjay Rawat/ Outlook

Not One To Plug Just before Vinod Mehta's book Editor Unplugged was to be launched, he was wheeled into the ICU. He never made it back, and to make amends, there was a launch of his book by ‘friend and philosopher’ Arundhati Roy as Vikram Seth eloquently read out passages from it. It was a warm and poignant evening with friends and fans, just as Mehta would have liked it.

Sanjay Rawat

Author Arundhati Roy at the launch of Vinod Mehta's book, Editor Unplugged in New Delhi.

Photo by Sanjay Rawat/ Outlook

From right, Member of Rajya Sabha D Raja, Political Editor of Outlook Magazine. Saba Naqvi, Author Suzanna Arundhati Roy, during the cremation of veteran journalist Vinod Mehta in New Delhi.

Photo by Sanjay Rawat/ Outlook

Arundhati Roy addressing a press conference in Nagpur.

PTI Photo

Arundhati Roy

Narendra Bisht

Mary Roy, women rights activist and mother of Man Booker prize winner Arundhati Roy, has joined the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP).

File Photo

Arundhati Roy

Narendra Bisht

Narendra Bisht

Eminent Novelist and writer Arundhati Roy at her residence in New Delhi.

Narendra Bisht

Eminent Novelist and writer Arundhati Roy at her residence in New Delhi.

Narendra Bisht

Eminent Novelist and writer Arundhati Roy at her residence in New Delhi.

Narendra Bisht

Eminent Novelist and writer Arundhati Roy at her residence in New Delhi.

Narendra Bisht

Eminent Novelist and writer Arundhati Roy at her residence in New Delhi.

Narendra Bisht

Eminent Novelist and writer Arundhati Roy at her residence in New Delhi.

Narendra Bisht

Eminent Novelist and writer Arundhati Roy at her residence in New Delhi.

Narendra Bisht

Eminent Novelist and writer Arundhati Roy at her residence in New Delhi.

Narendra Bisht

Eminent Novelist and writer Arundhati Roy at her residence in New Delhi.

Narendra Bisht

Eminent Novelist and writer Arundhati Roy at her residence in New Delhi.

Narendra Bisht

Illustration by Sorit

Arudhati Roy, at Press Club of India in New Delhi.

Narendra Bisht

Arudhati Roy, at Press Club of India in New Delhi.

Narendra Bisht

Arudhati Roy, at Press Club of India in New Delhi.

Narendra Bisht

Arudhati Roy, at Press Club of India in New Delhi.

Narendra Bisht

Arundhati Roy, Indian novelist and activist, at a press conference on issue of Binayak Sen's life term imprisonment in Press Club of India, New Delhi.

Sanjay Rawat

Narendra Bisht

Arundhati Roy, Indian novelist and activist, at a press conference on issue of Binayak Sen's life term imprisonment in Press Club of India, New Delhi.

Sanjay Rawat

Arundhati Roy, Indian novelist and activist, at a press conference on issue of Binayak Sen's life term imprisonment in Press Club of India, New Delhi.

Sanjay Rawat

Prashant Bhushan, a member of Lokpal Bill drafting committee, with author-activist Arundhati Roy during a public convention against corruption in New Delhi.

PTI Photo/Manvender Vashist

Arundhati Roy addressing activists of All India Students Association during a demonstration in support of Binayak Sen, at Jantar Manter in New Delhi.

PTI photo/ Atul Yadav

P. Chidambaram vs Arundhati Roy After Roy’s pointed jibes, the Union home minister came back with a diatribe in Parliament: “If the CPI (Maoist) overthrows the established authority and seizes power, will they allow any human rights organisation to function in this country? Will all those who write 33-page articles be allowed to write 33-page articles?” he asked, taking a dig at Roy’s long essay on the subject in Outlook. Roy didn’t blink.

Illustrations by Sorit

Writer-activist Arundhati Roy is escorted by security personnel as ABVP activists protest against her remarks on Kashmir, during her visit to Bhubaneswar.

PTI Photo

Sandeep Adhwaryu

October 1997
She’s Bookered! Pradip Kishen congratulates his wife Arundhati Roy on her winning the Man Booker prize for The God of Small Things.

Gauri Gill

sandeep adhwaryu

Writer-activist Arundhati Roy watches a protest after her speech was interrupted by it during Chairman of the hardline faction of Hurriyat Conference Syed Ali Shah Geelani's convention on 'Azaadi, the only way', in New Delhi.

PTI Photo/Manvender Vashist

Writer-activist Arundhati Roy watches a protest after her speech was interrupted by it as volunteers request for calm during Chairman of the hardline faction of Hurriyat Conference Syed Ali Shah Geelani's convention on 'Azaadi, the only way', in New Delhi.

PTI Photo/Manvender Vashist

Writer activist Arundhati Roy speaks during a meeting in New Delhi protesting the killing of freelance journalist Hem Chand Pandey in an alleged fake police encounter. Pandey was killed along with Maoist leader Azad in an encounter on July 2 in the Wankhidi forests of Adilabad in Andhra Pradesh.

AP Photo/Mustafa Quraishi

Renowned novelist and social activist Arundhati Roy addressing a public meeting in Mumbai

PTI Photo by Mitesh Bhuvad

Arundhati Roy

Framed Arundhati Roy, among the Maoists

Human Rights activist Goutam Navalakha and eminent writer and social activist Arundhati Roy jointly address a press conference on operation Green Hunt in Kolkata.

PTI Photo/Swapan Mahapatra

Dateline Dantewada: Roy with the Maoists

Arundhati Roy, a rights activist and Booker prize-winning novelist speaks at a press conference in New Delhi. Roy voiced her concerns about the government's proposed military offensive against Maoist rebels in the tribal-dominated areas of Central India.

AP Photo/Saurabh Das

Jeet Gayii! The day she won the Booker!

Stefan Rousseau/AP

Saturday 29 MayNovelist and human rights activist Arundhati Roy was awarded the 2004 Sydney Peace Prize for her work in social campaigns and advocacy of non-violence. The prize, the only international peace prize awarded in Australia, is awarded to an organisation or individual who has made significant contributions to global peace, including improvements in personal security and steps towards eradicating poverty and other forms of structural violence. "Arundhati Roy has been recognised for her courage in campaigns for human rights and for her advocacy of non-violence, as expressed in her demands for justice for the poor, for the victims of communal violence, for the millions displaced by the Narmada dam projects and for her opposition to nuclear weapons", the jury's citation read.

AP Photo

Arundhati Roy, Writer-ActivistModern India’s most captivating multi-causal writer and essayist, Arundhati Roy has agitated against nuclear proliferation, participated in the Narmada Bachao Andolan and passionately opposed the Iraq war. And, of course, there’s the Booker-winning The God of Small Things, an international bestseller. Originally trained as an architect, she mined into her campus life to script the 1988 cult classic, In Which Annie Gives it Those Ones. Other film assignments include a role in Massey Sahib (1985) and the screenplay of Electric Moon (1991). Arundhati Roy’s account, The Road to Harsud, on the death of a 700-year-old town caused by the Sardar Sarovar Dam, was our July 26, 2004 cover story.

Gireesh G.V

Friday 13 MaySocial activist and Booker Prize winner Arundhati Roy wishes good luck to a passenger and activist of "Right of Employment Bus" during its flagging off function in New Delhi. The Left parties and several voluntary organisations have launched the bus yatra, which will cover six northern Indian states, to consolidate the campaign for a universal and irreversible National Employment Guarantee Act. The one-month tour will seek to affirm the right to work as an aspect of the Fundamental Right to live with dignity. CPI(M) leader in Rajya Sabha Nilotpal Basu has also accused former Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Kalyan Singh of delaying the implementation of the law. Singh, a BJP leader, heads the parliamentary standing committee on rural development, which is examining the act and the amendments recommended by various parties.

AP Photo

Arundhati Roy joined the Tibetan monks at a protest in New Delhi on Saturday, April 12, 2008. The week also saw the high-profile IPS officer, Kiran Bedi, announcing her refusal to run in the relay with the Olympic Torch to be held on April 17, 2008.. "I cannot run in a cage. The security measures will reduce the torch run into mere tokenism and formality. Being a democratic country, we ought not to suppress democratic ways. Let them (Tibetans) demonstrate on one side and let the relay happen too. I am for a balance. Run the torch with a sense of participative space and manage dissent (Tibetan protests) without snuffing it out," she said. 

Also See: Tibet

AP Photo/Mustafa Quraishi

Wednesday February 13, 2008
(From Left) Outlook Editor-in-Chief Vinod Mehta, writer Arundhati Roy, playwright and actor Girish Karnad and writer Mahasweta Devi during a press conference of the Forum for the Protection of Free Speech and Expression in support of Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasreen in New Delhi on Wednesday. PTI Photo

Also See: Abiding Shame

PTI Photo

Social activist Arundhati Roy speaks to former Chief Justice of Delhi High Court Rajinder Sachar during a press conference organized by the People's Union for Civil Liberties(PUCL) in New Delhi to condemn the arrest of their Chhattisgarh state general secretary Binayak Sen on May 14 for alleged links with banned Maoist groups. PUCL has stated Sen has been victimised for campaigning against the controversial anti-naxal Salwa Judam movement and speaking out against atrocities by members of the group. Sen, a pediatrician, has been working for years in the villages of Chhattisgarh, trying to evolve a low cost health plan in a region where there's little or no administrative support. He is also one of the loudest critics of the Salwa Judum movement and was at the forefront of a campaign by the PUCL against fake encounters.

AP Photo/Gurinder Osan

Writer-activist Arundhati Roy participates in a demonstration at the CPI(M) headquarters in New Delhi organised by activists of the National Alliance of People's Movement, a group of various civil societies, against the West Bengal government's decision to give agricultural land to Tata Motors car project in Singur. Rubbishing allegations of double standards by it in the Singur land aquisition issue, the CPI(M) said the "opportunist combine" of BJP, Mamata Banerjee and Medha Patkar was spreading canard against the party and the Left Front government. In an editorial in the party mouthpiece People's Democracy, polit bureau member Sitaram Yechury singled out the Trinamool Congress alleging that it was trying to create mayhem in Singur by bringing people from outside armed with lethal weapons. Yechury's comments came a day after Medha accused the CPI(M) of following 'double standards' by trying to evict farmers at Singur for car project when it was fighting against their displacement in other states.

AP Photo/Manish Swarup

Monday 8 May
In a major blow to the Narmada Bachao Andolan (NBA), the Supreme Court has declined its plea to stop the ongoing construction work to raise the height of Sardar Sarovar Dam from the existing 110 metres to 121.92 m at this stage. The order was passed by a Bench headed by Chief Justice Y K Sabharwal after Additional Solicitor General Gopal Subramanian submitted that Prime Minister Manmohan Singh has constituted a three-member committee to look into the relief and rehabilitation work for project-affected families in Madhya Pradesh and the committee was likely to submit its report by June to him. The court also expressed the hope that all the parties concerned would fully cooperate and not cause any obstruction in the work of survey teams constituted by the group.

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