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Pervez Musharraf

Supporters of former Pakistani military ruler Gen. Pervez Musharraf protest a court's decision, in Lahore, Pakistan. The Pakistani court sentenced Musharraf to death in a treason case related to the state of emergency he imposed in 2007 while in power, officials said. Musharraf who is apparently sick and receiving treatment in Dubai where he lives was not present in the courtroom. Banner reads "Black decision is unacceptable."

Photo by AP/PTI

Supporters of former Pakistani military ruler Gen. Pervez Musharraf protest a court's decision, in Karachi, Pakistan. The Pakistani court sentenced Musharraf to death in a treason case related to the state of emergency he imposed in 2007 while in power, officials said. Musharraf who is apparently sick and receiving treatment in Dubai where he lives was not present in the courtroom.

AP Photo/Fareed Khan

In this file photo, Pakistan's former President and military ruler Pervez Musharraf arrives at an anti-terrorism court in Islamabad, Pakistan. Musharraf, 76, was on Tuesday, Dec. 17, 2019 handed death sentence in the long-drawn high treason case against him for suspending the Constitution and imposing emergency rule in 2007, a punishable offence for which he was indicted in 2014.

PTI Photo

Gen Musharraf with Manmohan Singh during the India-Pak ODI in Delhi in April 2005

Photograph by Narendra Bisht

With Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf during the Agra Summit, 2001

Photograph by T. Narayan

In this Jan 4, 2004, file photo former prime minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee is seen with the then Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf and Pakistani Zafarullha Khan Jamali at a meeting in Islamabad.

PTI Photo

Pakistanni President, General Pervez Musharraf with Prime Minister Manmohan Singh during Indo-pak ODI cricket match in Firozshah Kotla in New Delhi

Photograph by Narendra Bisht

President Pervez Musharraf (L) speaks with the new Pakistani army chief Gen. Ashfaq Kayani (C) at a change of command ceremony November 28, 2007 in Rawalpindi, Pakistan.

Photograph by Getty Images

Supporters of Pervez Musharraf gather outside a military hospital where he is admitted in Rawalpindi, Pakistan.

AP/PTI

Pakistani paramilitary soldiers and police officers stand guard outside an anti-terrorism court, where Pakistan's former president and military ruler Pervez Musharraf is appearing in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Musharraf appeared before the anti-terrorism court over the assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

Viva democracy Pervez Musharraf in court, before he was put under house arrest

AP

Pakistani police officers and explosive experts examine the explosive laden car which was parked outside Pervez Musharraf's farm house.

AP Photo/B.K. Bangash

Pakistani men ride a motorcycle past posters showing former President and military ruler Pervez Musharraf, in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

In this Monday, April 15, 2013 photo, Former Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf addresses his party supporters at his house in Islamabad, Pakistan. Musharraf was arrested from his farmhouse in a case relating to sacking of judges, a day after he dramatically fled the court to avoid detention, and remanded to two days in custody, becoming the first ex-army chief to face such action.

AP Photo/ B.K. Bangash

Pakistan's former President and military ruler Pervez Musharraf leaves the High Court in Islamabad, Pakistan. Musharraf and his security team pushed past policemen and sped away from a court in the country’s capital after his bail was revoked in a case in which he is accused of treason.

AP Photo/B.K. Bangash

Pakistani police officers stand alert outside the house of Pakistan's former President and military ruler Pervez Musharraf in Islamabad on Thursday. Musharraf and his security team pushed past policemen and sped away from a court in the country’s capital after his bail was revoked in a case in which he is accused of treason.

AP Photo/B.K. Bangash

An election banner showing Pakistan's former president and military ruler Pervez Musharraf, is used as a curtain on a makeshift home in a Christian slum on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

Pakistan's former President and military ruler Pervez Musharraf arrives to present party manifesto leaflets to candidates at his residence in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/B.K. Bangash

Pakistan's former president and military ruler Pervez Musharraf, center, leaves the High Court building in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/B.K. Bangash

Pakistan's former president and military ruler Pervez Musharraf, center, gestures as he leaves the High Court building in Islamabad, Pakistan. Musharraf appeared in the court during a hearing pertaining to the judges detention case. Pakistan's Supreme Court on Monday ordered Musharraf to respond to allegations that he committed treason while in power and barred him from leaving the country only weeks after he returned.

AP/PTI

A poster of former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf is placed on a pole in a neighborhood in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

Payback Musharraf, surrounded by guards, arrives at the Sindh High Court on March 29

PTI

Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, speaks during a press conference in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Fareed Khan

Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf wipes his face after a shoe was thrown at him as he headed to court to face legal charges in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Shakil Adil

TV Grab: Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, center, surrounded by guards when a shoe was thrown at him as he headed to court to face legal charges in Karachi, Pakistan.

TV Grab/ ABP News

Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, center, surrounded by guards, holds his head after a shoe was thrown at him as he headed to court to face legal charges in Karachi, Pakistan. Musharraf, who first seized power in a military coup in 1999, returned to Pakistan after returning from self-imposed exile.

AP Photo/ Shakil Adil

Sorit

A supporter of the Awami Majlis Amal Pakistan (AMAP) party hits a banner showing the picture of former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, with his shoe before burning it, during a demonstration against his return to Pakistan, in Quetta.Former President Pervez Musharraf returned to Pakistan after more than four years in exile, seeking a possible political comeback in defiance of judicial probes and death threats from Taliban militants.

AP Photo/Arshad Butt

Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, center, gestures to his supporters, unseen, upon his arrival to Karachi airport, Pakistan. Former President Pervez Musharraf returned to Pakistan after more than four years in exile, seeking a possible political comeback in defiance of judicial probes and death threats from Taliban militants.

AP Photo/S.I. Ali

Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf reacts while arriving at his office for a press briefing before leaving to Karachi in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

AP/PTI

Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf attends a ceremony to celebrate Pakistan National Day ahead his trip to Karachi, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Musharraf says he will follow through with his plans to return to his homeland despite risks of arrest and other threats.

AP Photo/ Kamran Jebreili

Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, center, cuts a cake during a ceremony to celebrate Pakistan National Day ahead of his trip to Karachi, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Musharraf says he will follow through with his plans to return to his homeland despite risks of arrest and other threats.

AP/PTI

Kargil ahoy! Sharif, Musharraf at Keil, near LoC, Feb ’99

AFP (From Outlook 18 February 2013)

Civvy Outlook Former Pakistani military ruler Pervez Musharraf’s penchant for grandstanding is well known. At the recent HT conclave in Delhi, he was just finishing off a grand speech on neighbourly relations, including some wise views on the future of a stable Afghanistan, when young Afghan diplomat, Zalmai Waffamal, weighed in. Himself a Pashtoon, Zalmai reminded the former dictator of Pakistan’s folly in pursuing policies to divide Afghanistan in an attempt to look for “strategic depth”. Musharraf was so taken aback that he sheepishly acknowledged that Pakistan had made past mistakes in Afghanistan, including creating the Taliban.

Illustration by Sorit

Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, center, cuts a ribbon aided by supporters during the inauguration of his party's new UK offices in London.

AP Photo/ Lefteris Pitarakis)

Woman supporters of former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf hold his poster as they take part in a rally in Karachi, Pakistan. Musharraf says he will return to Pakistan later this month and re-enter politics. Musharraf's return could add to political turbulence in an already feverish atmosphere in the country.

AP Photo/ Fareed Khan

Former Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf speaks during a meeting to raise funds for his new political party 'All Pakistan Muslim League' at Woodbine Convention Centre in Toronto, Canada.

PTI Photo

July 2001
Courting Love President Pervez Musharraf of Pakistan and his wife at the Taj during a visit that saw the general go one up on India with spunk.

T.Narayan

Protesters demonstrate by putting shoes over the face of a poster of former Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf outside a hall where he was holding a rally, in Birmingham.

AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth

Pervez Musharraf, the former President of Pakistan, stands in attention during his country's national anthem as he arrives for the announcement of the launch of his new political party, the 'All Pakistan Muslim League' in central London.

AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis

Pervez Musharraf, the former President of Pakistan, acknowledges the applaud of his supporters as he arrives for the announcement of the launch of his new political party, the 'All Pakistan Muslim League' in central London.

AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis

Saturday 16 AprilActress Rani Mukherjee greet President Musharraf and Prime Minister Manmohan Singh during an official dinner hosted by the PM at Delhi's Ashoka Hotel. Mukherjee - said to be Begum Musharraf's favourite actress, and after all she acted as the Pakistani human rights activist in Veer Zarra - was the only Bollywood star among the 250 guests invited for the banquet.

AP Photo/PTI¤ Subhash Chander Malhotra

Peace with Pakistan? The new year began with unexpected good news out of SAARC with a joint statement, something they had failed to agree on at Agra, in 2001. Whether it was mediation from Clinton or Bush that clinched the deal, or just the realities of the post 911 world, the two sides agreed to give peace a chance. And then followed the historical Cricket series in Pakistan. It was something the BJP would go on to make one of their poll planks, and lose. Since then, of course, there has been much bon homie over garbled Urdu poetry at New York between Manmohan Singh and Musharraf, with proposals and counter proposals and of course expected roadblocks for bus diplomacy, and intermittent complaints about

Monday August 18, 2008
Finally, after months, if not years, of speculation, Pakistan President General Pervez Musharraf stepped down: "After viewing the situation and consulting legal advisers and political allies, with their advice I have decided to resign...I don’t want anything from anybody. I have no interest. I leave my future in the hands of the nation and people....Finally, goodbye to Pakistan...." While speculation mounts about his -- and his country's future -- there is international concern about who is -- and will be -- in control of Pakistan's nuclear arsenal. Also See: The Morning After

AP Photo/Khalid Tanveer

Pakistan seems all set to impeach Pervez Musharaf, charging him with abrogating the constitution and damaging the country's democratic processes. But Musharraf, as is his wont, has dug his heels in, refusing to resign. Two simultaneous actions have been initiated. The first is to get all the four provincial assemblies to adopt resolutions asking President Musharraf to seek a fresh vote of confidence from the parliamentary electoral college - which comprises the provincial assemblies and the two houses of the national parliament. The North West Frontier Province and Punjab have already passed such a resolution and the assemblies of Sindh and Balochistan are expected to approve similar resolutions in coming days.  Simultaneously, the government has called the national parliament into session on August 18 to "start the impeachment proceedings". Given the composition of the present electoral college, there is no way that Musharraf can win a vote of confidence, but then he has the Indian example of "horse trading" before him. Or, of course, the honourable option of resigning, which seems to have been ruled out... Also See: Pakistan

AP Photo/K.M.Chaudary

In a day of flip-flops, Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf decided to go ahead with his visit to China to attend the opening ceremony of the Olympics Games, hours after abruptly cancelling his scheduled departure to Beijing, on Wednesday August 6, 2008, amid political efforts to impeach him. The Foreign Office initially announced that Musharraf had cancelled his scheduled visit this morning due to "developments at home". Later in the day, its spokesman Mohammad Sadiq said the President has decided to attend the opening ceremony of the Beijing Olympics "in view of our special relations with China".

AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti

Tuesday March 25, 2008
Pakistan has a new Prime Minister: Yousuf Raza Gillani was sworn in by President Pervez Musharraf as the country's 25th Prime Minister. He is the first non-Bhutto premier from the Pakistan People's Party. The first batch of ministers is likely to be administered the oath by Musharraf later in the week after Gillani obtains a vote of confidence from the National Assembly. It has widely been believed that Gilani's premiership may only be interim in nature and that it will just be a matter of time before Asif Ali Zardari contest elections.

AP Photo/B.K.Bangash

Afghanistan's President Hamid Karzai, left, and Pakistan's President Pervez Musharraf shake hands during a panel session on the second day of the Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum, WEF, in Davos, Switzerland. Top business leaders, heads of state from around the world as well as representatives of NGOs will gather here until Sunday, Jan. 27.

AP Photo/Keystone¤ Peter Klaunzer

And now that he is not a General... Pakistan's President Pervez Musharraf, center, reviews guard of honour after he was sworn in as the country's civilian president at President House in Islamabad, a day after ceding the powerful post of army chief - the basis of his rule for the past eight years.

AP Photo/B.K.Bangash¤ POOL

Pakistan's President Gen. Pervez Musharraf, left, salutes to his successor Gen. Ashfaq Kiyani during the change of command ceremony in Rawalpindi, Pakistan on Wednesday, November 28, 2007. Musharraf stepped down from his powerful post as Pakistan's military commander, a day before he was to be sworn in as a civilian president as part of his long-delayed pledge not to hold both jobs. Ending a 46-year career in the army, Musharraf formally handed over the charge to Kiyani, the 52-year-old former chief of the Inter-Services Intelligence agency who was hand-picked by him last month to head the 500,000-strong force. Musharraf is expected to end the emergency he imposed earlier this month within the next 48 hours.

AP Photo/Anjum Naveed

Well, he can use all the help he can get. During his brief official visit to Saudi Arabia, Pakistan President Musharraf also performed 'umrah' or a minor Haj pilgrimage and prayed, apparently, "for peace, security and prosperity of Pakistan". We are not sure what else he prayed for. In this picture released by Pakistan's Press Information Department, he is shown kissing Hajr-e-Aswad, the sacred stone in Mecca. Musharraf's wife Sehba Musharraf is seen on left.

AP Photo/Press Information Department/ho

A portrait of Pakistan's President Gen. Pervez Musharraf is removed from the front of the parliament building in Islamabad, Pakistan. Pakistan's Supreme Court has said it will not be intimidated by threats of martial law when it rules on whether to validate Musharraf's recent election victory.

AP Photo/Wally Santana

A man walks past a billboard showing the Pakistani President Gen. Pervez Musharraf near the Supreme Court in Islamabad. In a major step towards a possible power-sharing deal, Musharraf and former Premier Benazir Bhutto have reached an agreement on the President giving up his Army position. In a press conference, Railways Minister Sheikh Rashid Ahmed -- considered close to the General -- has said that "both sides have agreed on the issue of uniform" but added that there were still some outstanding issues to be resolved between the two sides. In a separate statement, Benazir has also confirmed that they 'are close to an agreement on sharing of power and Musharraf has agreed to resign as Army Chief.' Benazir's Pakistan People's Party (PPP) and Musharraf's representatives have been holding talks in an attempt to reach a political understanding and the self-exiled former Premier and Musharraf had met in Abu Dhabi recently and reportedly discussed the possibility of a power-sharing deal.

AP Photo/Anjum Naveed

Saturday 21 October
Sales person Mohammad Tahir displays the Urdu language version of Pakistani President Gen. Pervez Musharrafs' book In the Line of Fire at a local store in Islamabad. In the Urdu version of his autobiography , titled Sub Sey Pehlay Pakistan, the General has corrected an "error" he made in the English version that the "we have earned bounties totaling millions of dollars. Those who habitually accuse us of 'not doing enough' in the war on terror should simply ask the CIA how much prize money it has paid to the Government of Pakistan." The references of "bounties" and "prize money" for catching the Al Qaeda militants have been dropped in the Urdu version, that came after the English version sold 70,000 copies across the world.

AP Photo/Anjum Naveed

Thursday 28 September
Afghan President Hamid Karzai adjusts his cap as President Bush makes a statement with Pakistani President Gen. Pervez Musharraf in the Rose Garden at the White House. In an attempt end a disagreement on how to fight the Taliban in their border region, the US President appealed to his" personal friends" — the two Presidents made a public appearance after a dinner hosted by President Bush on Wednesday night, but did not speak or shake hands with each other. Later, upon his arrival in Britain, President Musharraf described his meeting with Bush and Karzai as "excellent" and said, "it has been decided that we have to forge a common strategy to defeat terrorism, jointly." The General has come under heavy attack for the role of Pakistan's Inter Services Intelligence for helping the Taliban and Al-Qaeda , but has defended ISI's and Pakistan's role in the 'war against terror', saying "you'll be brought down to your knees if Pakistan doesn't co-operate with you" and "if ISI is not with you, you will fail."

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

Afghan President Hamid Karzai adjusts his cap as President Bush makes a statement with Pakistani President Gen. Pervez Musharraf in the Rose Garden at the White House. The US President has appealed to the Presidents of Pakistan and Afghanistan to put aside their differences and fight terrorism. The two leaders are in a disagreement on how to fight the Taleban in their border region, with Gen Musharraf angrily rejecting the allegations that his ISI intelligence service is aiding the al-Qaeda and the Taleban. After a dinner hosted by President Bush on Wednesday night for his "personal friends", the two Presidents made a public appearance with him but did not speak or shake hands. Later, upon his arrival in Britain, President Musharraf described his meeting with Bush and Karzai as "excellent" and saying "it has been decided that we have to forge a common strategy to defeat terrorism, jointly."

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

Monday 25 September
Copies of Gen. Pervez Musharraf's memoir In the Line of Fire are kept on display at a book store in Islamabad, Pakistan. A week after his meeting with Prime Minister Manmohan Singh in Havana and declaring 'mohabbat zindabad' with India, the Pakistani President was in Washington where the US President clarified that Kashmir issue has to be resolved bilaterally and the ‘US can only help create conditions for peace and not "force" nations to reach agreements’. Earlier, the General had stated in a TV interview that the 'United States had threatened to bomb Pakistan "back to the stone age" if it did not cooperate in the war against terror after the September 11, 2001 attacks on America'. But when he was asked questions about his comments during a joint press conference with George Bush, the General refused to answer them citing a contract agreement with a book publisher as the reason while the US President asked the media person’s to "buy the book" instead.

AP Photo/Anjum Naveed

Saturday 16 September
The Havana Handshake. Suddenly, it is 'mohabbat zindabad' as President Musharraf gushed after his much-awaited hour-long meeting with Prime Minister Manmohan Singh which would be remembered for the decision to set up a joint anti-terrorism institutional mechanism.

AP Photo/Roberto Candia

European Union foreign policy chief Javier Solana reaches out to Pakistan's President Gen Pervez Musharraf during a meeting at the EU Council headquarters in Brussels. Ahead of his meeting with Prime Minister Manmohan Singh later this week, Musharraf said his country will not move from its stance on the Kashmir issue unless New Delhi moves from its stated position. He said an opportunity existed to resolve the Kashmir dispute, and that India's efforts to find a compromise would determine a firm agreement by Pakistan to dispense with a plebiscite in the state, a decades-old demand of Islamabad which it has virtually given up of late. Addressing a conference on Kashmir at the European Parliament in Brussels, Musharraf insisted on greater involvement of Kashmiris in resolving the dispute, saying "any settlement must be acceptable first" to the people of the state.

AP Photo/Virginia Mayo

Pakistan President Gen. Pervez Musharraf walks infront of a portrait of Qaid-e-Azam Mohammad Ali Jinnah during a rally in Lahore. Addressing a rally of some 80,000 people to mark the centenary of the ruling Pakistan Muslim League, Musharraf ordered all foreign militants to leave Pakistan or be killed.

AP Photo/K.M.Chaudary