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India, Bangladesh put off joint inspection of Ganga for river water sharing

India, Bangladesh put off joint inspection of Ganga for river water sharing
outlookindia.com
1970-01-01T05:30:00+0530
New Delhi, Mar 29 (PTI) In view of the lockdown, India and Bangladesh have extended stay of their teams that measure crucial hydrological data of Ganga in each other''s countries, and also postponed the next month''s high-level joint inspection under the Joint River Commission, sources said on Sunday.

The sources said Bangladesh has even agreed to take reading of the gauge post at the Farakka Barrage and Ganga Feeder Canalsources added.

Earlier, the teams would go in boats to take measurements, but due to the lockdown imposed in the wake of coronavirus pandemic that has been suspended, they added.

"Everything has been done after taking the Bangladeshi side into confidence and even they have agreed to it,” a senior official told PTI.

An Indo-Bangladesh Joint Rivers Commission (JRC) is functioning since 1972. It was established with a view to maintain liaison in order to ensure the most effective joint effort in maximising the benefits from common river systems.

Under the ‘Sharing of Ganga Waters at Farakka’ signed in 1996, “The Joint Committee shall set up suitable teams at Farakka and Hardinge Bridge to observe and record at Farakka the daily flows below Farakka Barrage, in the Feeder Canal, and at the Navigation Lock, as well as at the Hardinge Bridge.”

The treaty also states that if the Farakka Bridge has 70,000 cusecs or less water then both the countries have to share 50 per cent of water equally.

Accordingly, from January 1 to May 31, three Indian teams take turn to go Bangladesh at Hardinge Bridge located in western part of the country.

Roughly, each team comprising two engineers stay and monitor water levels at Hardinge Bridge for 50 days.

From the Bangladesh side, two teams consisting of two members in each group are stationed at Farrakah Barrage and the Ganga Feeder Canal.

The Bangladesh teams rotate after every 75 days.

The two sides have also agreed to postpone India’s visit to Hardinge Bridge under the Joint River Commission scheduled next month, the sources added.

The Bangladeshi team had visited India earlier this year. PTI PR RT

RT


Disclaimer :- This story has not been edited by Outlook staff and is auto-generated from news agency feeds. Source: PTI

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