photos

Muammar Gaddafi

A man walks next to a graffiti drawing depicting Libyan dictator Muammar Gddhafi in Benghazi, Libya.

AP Photo/ Rodrigo Abd

Street vendors wait for customers in front of a graffiti depicting Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi in Benghazi, Libya.

AP Photo/ Rodrigo Abd

A graffiti depicting Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi is seen downtown in Benghazi, Libya.

AP Photo/ Rodrigo Abd

A graffiti depicting Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi is seen in Benghazi, Libya.

AP Photo/ Rodrigo Abd

In this photo taken Wednesday, May 11, 2011, a graffiti depicting Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi is seen downtown in Benghazi, Libya. After more than 40 years under Gaddafi, Libyans in the rebel stronghold of Benghazi have taken to mocking the Libyan dictator with colorful caricatures. Before residents in the rebel-held east ripped themselves free from Gaddafi's rule, drawing such satirical pictures of the leader in public was unthinkable, and the regime would have severely punished anyone caught doing so. Text in the left reads: "Frighten Killer", and in the right: "Shame on you, dictator"

AP Photo/ Rodrigo Abd

A man practices with an RPG rocket launcher during a rebel military training session in Misrata, Libya. According to rebel military authorities, after six days of military training, new recruits are ready to go to fight on the front line against Muammar Gaddafi forces.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Gaddafi supporters rally on the main square in Tripoli, Libya. Muammar Gaddafi's forces rocketed rebel fighters in the formidable strongholds and training camps they have built up in the strategic mountain heights southwest of the Libyan capital.

AP Photo/ Darko Bandic

A rebel fighter carries away a carpet with the portrait of Muammar Gaddafi downtown in Benghazi, Libya.

AP Photo/ Rodrigo Abd

Graffiti depicts Muammar Gaddafi as a beast is seen in downtown in Benghazi, Libya. Libyans, some deep in mourning others invigorated by the spirit of the new free Libya, contemplate their past and hopes for the future in the hiatus between the Feb. 17 uprising that helped liberate Benghazi and uncertainty surrounding prolonged fighting for the rest of the country.

AP Photo/ Rodrigo Abd

A woman poses for a picture during an anti Muammar Gaddafi demonstration, who is depicted in graffiti behind, in Benghazi, Libya.

AP Photo/ Rodrigo Abd

Libyan walk past graffiti caricatures related to Muammar Gaddafi after attending Muslims weekly Friday prayers in Benghazi, Libya. The Arabic text reads "The green book. Oh mother it's a black book. Libya is too cold for you.".

AP Photo/ Bernat Armangue

Street vendors wait for customers in front of a graffiti depicting Muammar Gaddafi being punched, in downtown Benghazi, Libya.

AP Photo/ Rodrigo Abd

Supporters carrying poster of the Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi's react following an airstrike in Tripoli, Libya.

AP Photo/ Darko Bandic

A rebel walks next to a cartoon depicting Muammar Gaddafi as Adolf Hitler, holding a book titled 'My green book' in the rebel Media Center in Benghazi, Libya. Luis Moreno-Ocampo, prosecutor of the International Criminal Court in The Hague, announced that he would seek arrest warrants against the leader of Libya, Muammar Gaddafi, his son Seif al-Islam and the country's intelligence chief on charges of crimes against humanity.

AP Photo/ Rodrigo Abd

A TV grab shows Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi holds a meeting with tribal leaders from eastern Libya, in Tripoli, Libya.

AP Photo/ Libyan TV via APTN

Migrants gather under a tree at a makeshift camp near the port while waiting to be evacuated from the battered city of Misrata, Libya. Muammar Gaddafi's forces used tanks to shell the besieged western town of Misrata, as rumors fueled fears that the Libyan leader was preparing to use chemical weapons.

AP Photo/Bernat Armangue

Moammar Gadhafi's son Seif al-Arab, who was killed in a NATO missile strike, is seen in this undated photo, in Tripoli, Libya. Muammar Gaddafi escaped the missile strike but his son Seif and his three young grandchildren were killed.

AP Photo/Darko Bandic

Libyans inspect damage while standing next to an unexploded missile at the Gaddafi family compound in a residential area of Tripoli, Libya. Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi escaped a NATO missile strike in Tripoli that killed one of his sons and three young grandchildren.

AP Photo/ Darko Bandic

Ruins of a house are seen at the site of a NATO missile attack in Tripoli, Libya. Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi survived a NATO missile strike that killed his youngest son, Saif al-Arab Gadhafi and three grandchildren and wounded friends and relatives, Libya's spokesman said.

AP Photo/ Darko Bandic

Government officials and members of the media inspect ruins of a house at the site of a NATO missile attack in Tripoli, Libya. Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi survived a NATO missile strike that killed his youngest son, Saif al-Arab Gaddafi and three grandchildren and wounded friends and relatives.

AP Photo/ Darko Bandic

A portrait of Muammar Gaddafi is seen inside damaged official building following an airstrike in Tripoli, Libya.

AP Photo/ Darko Bandic

A man passes by graffiti caricatures of Muammar Gaddafi, during a funeral in Benghazi. The writing on the wall reads "the greatest rat of all," in Arabic. Europe is ready to send an armed force to Libya to ensure delivery of humanitarian aid and Britain said it will dispatch senior military officers to advise the opposition- signs that Western nations are inching closer to having troops on Libyan soil.

AP Photo

A TV Grab shows Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi waving at his supporters while being driven around Tripoli standing up through the sunroof of a car. Forces loyal to Muammar Gaddafi shelled a besieged western city, killing at least 13 people, and new explosions rocked Tripoli as the U.S. told a NATO meeting the alliance must intensify its mission to isolate the Libyan leader and "bring about his departure."

AP Photo / Libyan TV

From left: South African President Jacob Zuma, Congo's President Denis Sassou-Nguesso, Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, Mauritania President Mohamed Ould Abdel Aziz and African-Union Commissioner John Bing stand outside a tent in Tripoli, Libya. Envoys from the African Union, including South African president Jacob Zuma, are to hold talks with Gaddafi and rebels during a two-day visit, as the African Union made a new call for a ceasefire between Colonel Gaddafi's forces and Libyan rebels.

AP/PTI

Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi looks on during a meeting with African leaders to find a road map to a cease fire in Tripoli, Libya. Envoys from the African Union, including South African president Jacob Zuma, are to hold talks with Gaddafi and rebels during a two-day visit, as the African Union made a new call for a ceasefire between Colonel Gadhafi's forces and Libyan rebels.

AP Photo/ Pier Paolo Cito

Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi waves at people during a meeting with African leaders to find a road map to a cease fire in Tripoli, Libya.

AP Photo/ Abdel Magid Al Fergany

Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi waves at his supporters people in Tripoli, Libya. Envoys from the African Union, including South African president Jacob Zuma , are to hold talks with Gaddafi and rebels during a two-day visit beginning Sunday, as the African Union made a new call for a ceasefire between Colonel Gaddafi's forces and Libyan rebels.

AP Photo/ Pier Paolo Cito

A Libyan soldier carrying a portrait of Muammar Gaddafi is seen on a street under government control in Misrata, 200 kms east of Tripoli, Libya.

AP Photo/ Albert Facelly,Sipa Press

A Communist demonstrator holds a portrait of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi during a protest against the international air strikes on the North African nation at the U.S. Consulate in St. Petersburg, Russia.

AP Photo/ Dmitry Lovetsky

Supporters of Nicaragua's President Daniel Ortega hold portraits of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi at a demonstration in favor of Gaddafi outside the Libyan embassy in Managua, Nicaragua.

AP Photo/ Esteban Felix

Visitors watch TV screens broadcasting news of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi speak to his supporters, top left, during the China Content Broadcasting Network Expo held in Beijing . China called for an immediate cease-fire in Libya where the U.S. and European nations have launched punishing airstrikes to enforce a U.N. no-fly zone.

AP Photo/ Andy Wong

In this image taken from Libyan State TV, showing Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi as he talks to a large crowd in Bab El Azizia, Libya. Making his first public appearance since the launch of coalition air strikes on his forces, a defiant Muammar Gaddafi pledged victory and said he was ready to die as a "martyr" in Libya.

AP Photo/ Libyan State TV

Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamiat Uema-i-Pakistan shout slogans during a pro-Gaddafi rally in Karachi, Pakistan. They condemned the bombings against Libya by the United States, Europe and other countries. Placards read "holy war."

AP Photo/Shakil Adil

Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamiat Uema-i-Pakistan pray for Muammar Gaddafi during a rally in Karachi, Pakistan. They condemned the bombings against Libya by the United States, Europe and other countries. Placards read "Tyrant Americans do not consider Libyans as an easy prey."

AP Photo/Shakil Adil

Aisha Gadhafi, right, daughter of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, is surrounded by supporters at the Bab Al Azizia compound in Tripoli, Libya. President Barack Obama authorized limited military action against Libya, saying Muammar Gaddafi's continued assault on his own people left the U.S. and its international partners with no other choice. The Pentagon said 112 cruise missiles were launched from US and UK ships and subs, hitting 20 targets.

AP Photo/ Jerome Delay

A Libyan soldier loyal to Muammar Gaddafi displays his tatoo on the western entrance of the city of Ajdabiya, Libya.

AP Photo/ Jerome Delay

Seif al-Islam Gaddafi, son of Libyan Leader Muammar Gaddafi, speaks during a TV interview in Tripoli.

AP Photo/ Euronews, via APTN

Seif al-Islam Gaddafi, son of Libyan Leader Muammar Gaddafi, smiles during a TV interview in Tripoli.

AP Photo/ Euronews. via APTN

A man makes a phone call next to a portrait of Libyan Leader Muammar Gaddafi, seen partially reflected, in the lobby of a hotel in which a press conference by tribal leaders was taking place in Tripoli, Libya. Muammar Gaddafi's warplanes, artillery and mortar shells can control huge swaths of territory by day, including oil ports, rebel supply routes and even hostile towns but rebels say anti-government forces can still return in darkness to take advantage of Gaddafi's own thin supply lines and overstretched ground troops.

AP Photo/ Ben Curtis

Seif al-Islam Gaddafi, son of Libyan Leader Muammar Gaddafi, gestures as he speaks to supporters and the media in Tripoli, Libya. Seif al-Islam vowed to retake the eastern half of the country, which has been in the opposition's hands since early on in the 3-week-old uprising.

AP Photo/ Ben Curtis

WHO
From left above, Hannibal, Saadi and Saif, sons of Libyan despot Muammar Gaddafi
WHY
What do a plagiarised PhD thesis, a nightclub dancer and domestic violence have in common? The Brothers Gaddafi. The Libyan leader’s profligate sons have been making headlines at home and in Europe with a speed that matches the unravelling fortunes of their father.
WHAT
While Saif got his LSE thesis ghostwritten, playboy Saadi befriended a nightclub hottie (who allegedly spotted suitcases stuffed with money through faux smoke and disco lights), and Hannibal left his wife with a broken nose. Nice.

Libyan Leader Muammar Gaddafi arrives at a hotel to give television interviews in Tripoli, Libya.

AP Photo/ Ben Curtis

A carnival float, depicting Libyan Leader Muammar Gaddafi with a barrel of oil is kissed by a man symbolizing Europe with a sack of money is part of the traditional carnival Rosemonday Parade in Duesseldorf, Germany. The foolish street spectacles in the carnival centers of Duesseldorf, Mainz and Cologne, watched by hundreds of thousands of people, are the highlights in Germany's carnival season on Rosemonday.

AP Photo/Frank Augstein

Gaddafi in his golf-cart after completing a speech in Tripoli, March 2

Reuters (From Outlook, March 14, 2011)

Libyan Leader Moammar Gadhafi smells flowers given to him by a supporter as he drives away in an electric golf cart after speaking in Tripoli, Libya.

AP Photo/ Ben Curtis

A political book showing Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi burns in a fire during a demonstration against him in Benghazi, eastern Libya.

AP Photo/ Kevin Frayer

A Libyan protester holds a poster depicting Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi with devil horns and legend "The King of the Devil's Kings", next to a pyre as protesters burn copies of the "Green Book" written by Gaddafi, during a demonstration against him in Benghazi, eastern Libya.

AP Photo/ Kevin Frayer

Libyan Leader Muammar Gaddafi adjusts his gown as he leaves after speaking in Tripoli, Libya. Gadhafi vowed "We will fight until the last man and woman" and lashed out against Europe and the United States for their pressure on him to step down, warning that thousands of Libyans will die if U.S. and NATO forces intervene in the conflict.

AP Photo/ Ben Curtis

Libyan Leader Muammar Gaddafi waves to supporters as he arrives to speak in Tripoli, Libya. Gadhafi vowed "We will fight until the last man and woman" and lashed out against Europe and the United States for their pressure on him to step down, warning that thousands of Libyans will die if U.S. and NATO forces intervene in the conflict.

AP Photo/Ben Curtis

A billboard, featuring a picture of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, is seen partially burned by anti-government protesters, in the southwestern town of Nalut, Libya. The town is currently in control of the Libyan anti-government forces.

AP Photo/ Lefteris Pitarakis

In this image made from video provided by ABC News, Christiane Amanpour greets Libyan President Muammar Gaddafi in Tripoli, Libya before an interview.

AP Photo/ ABC News

A Pro-Gadhafi supporter simulates the salute portrayed in a photograph of the Libyan Leader Muammar Gaddafi, as he and others stage a small rally, standing on the stage of the Roman amphitheatre at the Sabratha archaeological site, after following foreign journalists there who visited on a government-provided tour, in Sabratha, Libya. Gaddafi supporters said that they were in control of the city of Sabratha, west of Tripoli, which has seemed to vacillate between the two camps over the past week, with some anti-Gaddafi graffiti scrawled on walls being painted over by residents.

AP Photo/ Ben Curtis

Women protest while holding banners reading "the true Libya", "free Libya" and "freedom for Libya" during a demonstration against Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi in the centre of Madrid, Spain.

AP Photo/ Andres Kudacki

Libyans living in South Korea trample pictures of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi at a mosque in a rally near the Libya embassy in Seoul, South Korea.

AP Photo/ Lee Jin-man

Residents gather near the courthouse, as a flag of Libya's monarchy prior to Muammar Gaddafi's reign flies above, in Benghazi, Libya. Militiamen loyal to Muammar Gaddafi clamped down in Tripoli, but cracks in his regime spread elsewhere across the nation, as the protest-fueled rebellion controlling much of eastern Libya claimed new gains closer to the capital.

AP Photo/ Alaguri

Libyan protesters rally against Libyan Leader Moammar Gadhafi, in Tobruk, Libya. Heavy gunfire broke out in Tripoli as forces loyal to Muammar Gaddafi tightened their grip on the Libyan capital while anti-government protesters claimed control of many cities elsewhere.

AP Photo/Hussein Malla

This image broadcast on Libyan state television shows Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi as he addresses the nation in Tripoli, Libya. Libya's Gadhafi vowed to fight on against protesters demanding his ouster and die as martyr.

AP Photo/Libya State Television via APTN

This image broadcast on Libyan state television shows Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi as he addresses the nation in Tripoli, Libya. Libya's Gadhafi vowed to fight on against protesters demanding his ouster and die as martyr.

AP Photo/Libya State Television via APTN

A Libyan protester burns a poster of Libyan Leader Muammar Gaddafi, during a protest in front of the Libyan embassy in Cairo, Egypt.

AP Photo/Hussein Malla

Egyptian army soldiers stand in front of the Libyan embassy entrance, during a demonstration calling for the ouster of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, in Cairo, Egypt.

AP Photo/Hussein Malla

Supporters of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi with posters stand behind the fence of the Libyan embassy and shout slogans against protesters outside the embassy in Berlin.

AP Photo/Markus Schreiber

A video image broadcast on Libyan state television shows longtime Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi appearing in Tripoli in the evening. Women and children were seen among his supporters, many of whom chanted and held pictures in support of their leader. Libyan forces fired machine-guns at mourners marching in a funeral for anti-government protesters in the eastern city of Benghazi, a day after commandos and foreign mercenaries loyal to longtime leader Moammar Gadhafi pummeled demonstrators with assault rifles and other heavy weaponry.

AP Photo/ Libyan state television

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, left, grasps the hand of Libyan Leader Moammar Gadhafi at the Special Session of the African Union Assembly on the Consideration and Resolution of Conflicts in Africa, in Tripoli, Libya. The Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi blamed much of Africa's violence on what he described as intervention by unnamed "foreign powers," bent on plundering Africa's natural resources.

AP Photo/Ben Curtis

Ceremonial horsemen stand on their horses as a display of skill, at a lavish private dance spectacle thrown for African heads of state by Libyan Leader Moammar Gadhafi, and celebrating the 40th anniversary of the 1969 military coup that brought him to power, at a military airfield outside Tripoli, Libya.

AP Photo/Ben Curtis

Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi walks past the honour guard with Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi, not in the picture, after landing at Rome's Ciampino airport. Gadhafi is on a three-day official visit to Italy.The Libyan leader began his first visit to Italy with a warm embrace from Premier Silvio Berlusconi, evidence of better ties between the energy-rich desert nation and its former colonial ruler. On his jacket he wears a photo showing Omar Mukhtar (in chains) who organized and devised strategies for the Libyan resistance against the Italian colonization. He was arrested and subsequently executed by hanging in 1931 by the Italians.

AP Photo / Riccardo De Luca

Fireworks explode over a display in Tripoli's Green Square, bearing the image of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, in celebration of the 33rd anniversary of the Libyan Jamahirya (State of the masses). The anniversary commemorates the coup by which the Revolutionary Command Council lead by Colonel Gadhafi took power.

Domenico Stinellis/ AP

A Libyan worker cleans in front of a billboard of the country's leader Moammer Gadhafi at the convention center in Sirte, Libya, in preparation for the second extraordinary summit of the Assembly of the African Union to be held on February 27 and 28. The United States today lifted a ban on travel to Libya as a reward for its decision to scrap its nuclear weapons programme. The US move follows Tripoli's affirmation on Wednesday that it stood by its acceptance of responsibility for the Lockerbie bombing in 1988. Earlier Libya had affirmed that it paid $ 2.7 billion compensation to the victims' families for ' buying peace' with the West, rather than accepting guilt.

AP Photo/Amr Nabi

Thursday 25 MarchBritish Prime Minister Tony Blair and Libyan leader Col. Muammar Gaddafi take an hour long break during their talks in Tripoli. Blair's visit to Libya is first by a British Prime Minister after Winston Churchill visited the country during the second World War. Blair said Gaddafi was willing to make 'common cause' with Britain in the fight against terrorism and that there was real hope for a 'new relationship'. The meeting coincided with announcement that the Anglo-Dutch oil giant Shell had signed a deal worth up to £550m for gas exploration rights off the Libyan coast , marking the re-entry of Libya in international oil trade.

AP Photo/Stefan Rousseau/PA

Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi walks past a painting at the EU Commission headquarters in Brussels, Belgium. Gaddafi's visit to Brussels is his first trip to Europe in 15 years. The Libyan leader said that by renouncing weapons of mass destruction, Libya had secured more benefits for itself than it could by possessing such weapons and urged other countries to follow his example.

AP Photo/European Commission

A supporter holds up a poster of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi in Martyr's Square in Tripoli at an annual celebration to mark the 36th anniversary of the September 1, 1969 coup that brought him to power.

AP Photo/Yousef al-Ageli

Ramon Tikaram plays the role of the Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, with Sharon Duncan-Brewster, in the role of the chief bodyguard, Fatima, during the full dress rehearsal of the opera,'Gaddafi: A Living Myth', at London's English National Opera. The first performance of the opera is on September 7.

AP Photo/ Max Nash

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