Canada

Canada wildfire: Northwestern Territory city Yellowknife compels 20,000 people to evacuate

Yellowknife, Canada’s Northwest Territories’ capital city, is under serious threat from a raging wildfire this fire season. Evacuation orders have forced all 20,000 residents to flee as firefighters battle to protect the city from the spreading flames.

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Wildfires (Representational Image)
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Canadian firefighters battled early on Thursday morning to prevent wildfires from reaching the northern city of Yellowknife, where all 20,000 residents are leaving after an evacuation order.

Water planes flew low over Yellowknife as thick smoke covered the capital of the huge and meagerly populated Northwest Domains.

The city of Yellowknife in the Northwest Territories is no stranger to the threat of forest fires. However, the current fire has proven particularly threatening, prompting local authorities to issue evacuation orders to tens of thousands of residents. As families quickly gathered their loved ones' belongings and pets, shelters and relief efforts were quickly organized to provide aid and support to those displaced.

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The wildfires are still being fought, and firefighters, emergency services, and volunteers are working tirelessly to contain the fire and prevent further damage. A coordinated response with local, regional, and national agencies is essential to mitigate the extent of a disaster and ensure the safety of affected communities.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau plans to hold a gathering of the Incident Response Group to examine the flames later on Thursday, his office said. The gathering contains senior authorities and pastors and meets in instances of emergency.

It's Canada's worst fire season, with more than 1,000 fires burning across the country, including 265 alone in the Northwest Territories. According to experts, climate change has exacerbated the wildfire problem.

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Yellowknife Mayor Rebecca Alty said special crews were clearing trees near the city to prevent the flames from spreading. They also planned to use fire retardant and make sure the city's sprinklers were working,  she told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

In the wake of this devastating natural disaster, there is a need to strengthen collective efforts not only to extinguish the current inferno but also to strengthen strategies to prevent and manage such crises in the future. The events in Yellowknife highlight the importance of prioritising sustainable practises, climate resilience, and a willingness to protect communities and their way of life.
 

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