photos

Hawaii

This photo released by the U.S. Geological Survey shows continuing eruption of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano.

Photo by AP/PTI

In this photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, plumes rise from active fissures in the crater of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano.

U.S. Geological Survey via AP

In this photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, a lava lake continues its rise in the crater of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano. Lava is rising more than 3 feet per hour in the deep crater of a Hawaii volcano that began erupting over the weekend.

H. Dietterich/U.S. Geological Survey via AP

In this photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, an active fissure is seen in the crater of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano. Lava is rising more than 3 feet per hour in the deep crater of a Hawaii volcano that began erupting over the weekend. The U.S. Geological Survey says Kilauea volcano within Hawaii Volcanoes National Park on the Big Island was gushing molten rock from at least two vents inside its summit crater.

U.S. Geological Survey via AP

In this photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, lava flows within the Halema’uma’u crater of the Kilauea volcano. The Kilauea volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island has erupted, the U.S. Geological Survey said.

U.S. Geological Survey via AP

In this photo provided by the National Park Service, people watch an eruption from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano on the Big Island. The volcano shot steam and an ash cloud into the atmosphere which lasted about an hour, an official with the National Weather Service said.

Janice Wei/National Park Service via AP

A plume rises near active fissures in the crater of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano. People are lining up to try to get a look at the volcano on the Big Island, which erupted last night and spewed ash and steam into the atmosphere.

M. Patrick/U.S. Geological Survey via AP

A plume rises near active fissures in the crater of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano. People are lining up to try to get a look at the volcano on the Big Island, which erupted last night and spewed ash and steam into the atmosphere. A spokeswoman for Hawaii Volcanoes National Park says the volcanic activity is a risk to people in the park and that caution is needed.

Photo by AP/PTI

In this photo provided by the National Park Service, people watch an eruption from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano on the Big Island. The volcano shot steam and an ash cloud into the atmosphere which lasted about an hour, an official with the National Weather Service said.

AP/PTI

In this image provided by the U.S. Navy, sailors man the rails as the guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112) prepares to pass the Battleship Missouri Memorial and USS Arizona Memorial during the official ceremony for the 75th anniversary of the Japanese surrender that ended World War II, in Honolulu, Hawaii.

AP/PTI

A medical worker talks to a person in their car outside an Urgent Care Hawaii medical clinic in Pearl City, Hawaii. Urgent Care Hawaii is offering drive through testing for the coronavirus. Signs posted outside the clinic state do not enter if you are coming in to get tested for COVID-19.

AP Photo/Marco Garcia

NSW Rural Fire Service crews fight the Gospers Mountain Fire as it impacts a structure at Bilpin. Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison apologized for taking a family vacation in Hawaii as deadly bushfires raged across several states, destroying homes and claiming the lives of two volunteer firefighters.

Photo by AP/PTI

In this photo, musician Paul Simon, left, joins in a prayer lead by Aimee Sato, second from right, prior to the planting of a lama tree at Auwahi Forest Reserve on Maui, Hawaii. The tree planting is a part of a growing forest restoration effort on Hawaii's second largest island.

AP/PTI

Actor Jason Momoa holds the hands of his children, Nakoa-Wolf Momoa, left, and Lola Momoa, right, as he is welcomed with a hula while visiting elders and Native Hawaiian protesters blocking the construction of a giant telescope on Hawaii's tallest mountain, at Mauna Kea Access Road in Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

Hollyn Johnson/Hawaii Tribune-Herald via AP

Actor Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson watches a kahiko performance during a visit to the protest site blocking the construction of the TMT telescope at the base of Mauna Kea on Hawaii Island.

Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser via AP

Actor Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson walks on Mauna Kea Access Road during a visit to the protest site against the TMT telescope at the base of Mauna Kea on Hawaii Island.

Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser via AP

This photo provided by the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) shows people who are against the construction of a Hawaii telescope continuing to block the roadway to the top of Mauna Kea, a mountain considered sacred by some Native Hawaiians, as the protest entered its fourth day. The action Thursday comes a day after 33 people were arrested, many of them elderly. Activists have fought the $1.4 billion Thirty Meter Telescope in courts and on the streets for years, but the latest protest could be their final stand as they run out of legal options.

Hawaii DLNR via AP

Activist Walter Ritte, left, and others lay chained to a cattle grate blocking a road at the base of Hawaii's tallest mountain in Mauna Kea, Hawaii, protesting the construction of a giant telescope on land that some Native Hawaiians consider sacred.

AP Photo/Caleb Jones

Officials remove bodies from the wreckage of a helicopter in Kailua, Hawaii. Fire and helicopter parts rained from the sky Monday in a suburban Honolulu community as a tour helicopter crashed and killed all three people aboard, officials and witnesses said.

AP/PTI

There’s a thing called adrenaline rush and it will take a huge dose of hermetic self-restraint to stop its flow. It’s in our DNA; and also in this golfer’s…playing a shot while an ash plume rises in the background from the Kilauea ­volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island in May.

Photograph by Getty Images

Tony Reis, a resident of Lawai, Kauai, reacts while watching a Kauai Police Department officer assess safety conditions on Waha Road and its narrow bridge during the heavy rains that pelted the island.

Dennis Fujimoto/The Garden Island via AP

Motorists brave the flooded intersection at Weliweli and Koloa roads, following heavy rains in Koloa, Kauai.

Dennis Fujimoto/The Garden Island via AP

A Kauai Police Department officer checks for safety concerns at the narrow bridge on Waha Road in Lawai, Kauai during the heavy rains that blanketed the island. The National Weather Service says leftover moisture from Tropical Depression Lane is bringing rain to Kauai.

Dennis Fujimoto/The Garden Island via AP

This provided by the County of Kauai shows flooding at Ala Eke near the town of Hanalei on the island of Kauai in Hawaii. Officials are urging some residents on Kauai to evacuate because heavy rains are causing streams to rise.

County of Kauai via AP

Austin Seawright, right, stacks sandbags in front of a closed store in preparation for Hurricane Lane in Honolulu. Forecasters say Hurricane Lane has shifted course and is now moving closer to Hawaii.

AP Photo/John Locher

Workers board up an ABC Store near the beach in preparation for Hurricane Lane, in Honolulu, Hawaii.

AP Photo/John Locher

A man fills up his truck as other vehicles line up behind for gasoline at a Costco in preparation for Hurricane Lane, in Kapolei, Hawaii.

AP Photo/John Locher

People surf off Waikiki Beach ahead of Hurricane Lane, in Honolulu.

AP/PTI

This photo provided by Jessica Henricks shows flooding Wailuku River near Hilo, Hawaii. Hurricane Lane brought torrential rains to Hawaii's Big Island and Maui before the storm was expected to hit Oahu. A powerful hurricane unleashed torrents of rain and landslides that blocked roads on the rural Big Island but didn't scare tourists away from surfing and swimming at popular Honolulu beaches still preparing get pummeled by the erratic storm.

Jessica Henricks via AP

This NASA satellite natural-color image made shows Hurricane Lane as a powerful category 4 storm with maximum sustained winds of 250 kilometers (155 miles) per hour. The Big Island of Hawaii is at upper left. Hurricane Lane has weakened as it approaches Hawaii but was still expected to pack a wallop, forecasters said as people hurried to buy water and other supplies and the Navy moved its ships to safety.

NASA via AP

Contractor David Meyer, bottom, pushes a plywood board to Alecia Cone, left, and Craig Maromoto as they cover a window in preparation of the approaching strong winds expected from Hurricane Lane in Honolulu. Hurricane Lane has weakened as it approaches Hawaii but was still expected to pack a wallop, forecasters said. Hawaii residents prepared for the hurricane by buying water, flashlights, propane and other emergency supplies.

AP Photo/Marco Garcia

In this aerial photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, lava from the last active eruption site on Hawaii's Kilauea volcano is shown near Pahoa, Hawaii. The volcano changed dramatically over the weekend as lava from the site slowed and fewer earthquakes were recorded across the region. The pause in volcanic activity comes as Hurricane Hector moves closer to Hawaii, a storm that is expected to pass south of the Big Island Tuesday night and Wednesday as it moves westward.

U.S. Geological Survey via AP

In this satellite image provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the eye of Hurricane Hector can be seen as the storm moves toward Hawaii. A tropical storm watch was in effect Monday, Aug. 6 for waters south of the Big Island as Hector was expected to pass Tuesday night and Wednesday as it moved westward.

NOAA via AP

Military members carry transfer cases from a C-17 at a ceremony marking the arrival of the remains believed to be of American service members who fell in the Korean War at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in Hawaii. North Korea handed over the remains last week.

AP Photo/Susan Walsh

In this photo from the U.S. Geological Survey, fissure 8 below Kilauea Volcano continues to erupt vigorously with lava streaming through a channel that reaches the ocean at Kapoho Bay on the island of Hawaii. The width of the active part of the lava channel varies along its length, but ranges from about 100 to 300 meters (yards) wide. A clear view of the cinder-and-spatter cone that's building around the vent from ongoing lava fountains can be seen here.

U.S. Geological Survey via AP

Most of the Kapoho area including the tide pools is now covered in fresh lava with few properties still intact as the Kilauea Volcano lower east rift zone eruption continues in Pahoa, Hawaii.

AP Photo/LE Baskow

This photo from the U.S. Geological Survey shows a laze (lava haze) plume rising from the northern side of the fissure 8 lava flow margins in the former Kapoho Bay at the town of Kapoho on the island of Hawaii.

AP/PTI

This photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, taken from a search aircraft, shows an outbreak of Pahoehoe lava that was very rapidly moving north down Luana Street into a portion of Leilani Estates as searchers attempted to evacuate a resident who was about to be stranded by the fast-moving flow, near Pahoa on the island of Hawaii. By monitoring the flow they were able to advise those on the ground of its progress.

U.S. Geological Survey via AP

In this photo, area residents, the media and national guard flock to what is now the end of Leilani Avenue to take in the fiery show at fissures 2, 7 and 8 of the Kilauea volcano near Pahoa.

AP/PTI

United States Geological Survey personnel monitor and record active lava fissures near what is now the end of Kahukai Street as they continue to spew forth lava several stories into the air at Leilani Estates near Pahoa, Hawaii.

George F. Lee /Honolulu Star-Advertiser via AP

Lava sends up clouds of steam and toxic gases as it enters the Pacific Ocean as Kilauea Volcano continues its eruption cycle near Pahoa on the island of Hawaii. As hot lava boils cool seawater, a series of chemical and physical reactions create a mixture of condensed acidic steam, hydrochloric acid gas, and tiny shards of volcanic glass. Blown by wind, this plume creates a noticeable downwind haze, known as "laze," short for lava haze, which irritates lungs, eyes and skin.

U.S. Geological Survey via AP

This photo shows a helicopter overflight of Kilauea volcano's lower East Rift Zone near Pahoa, Hawaii. The volcano produces methane when hot lava buries and burns plants and trees. Scientists say the methane can seep through cracks several feet away from the lava.

AP/PTI Photo

Jack Jones, visiting from Madison, Wis., takes pictures at a country club in Volcano, Hawaii as a huge ash plume rises from the summit of Kiluaea volcano. Kilauea has burned some 40 structures, including two dozen homes, since it began erupting in people's backyards in the Leilani Estates neighborhood on May 3. About 2,000 people have evacuated their homes, including 300 who were staying in shelters.

AP/PTI Photo

Doug Ralston plays golf in Volcano, Hawaii, as a huge ash plume rises from the summit of Kiluaea volcano. Lava from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano is pouring into the sea and setting off a chemical reaction that creates giant clouds of acid and fine glass.

AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

Joe Kekedi watches as lava enters the ocean, generating plumes of steam near Pahoa, Hawaii.

AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

Steam rises as lava flows into the ocean near Pahoa, Hawaii. Kilauea volcano that is oozing, spewing and exploding on Hawaii's Big Island has gotten more hazardous in recent days, with rivers of molten rock pouring into the ocean and flying lava causing the first major injury.

AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

Lava explodes above a tree on Kilauea volcano near Pahoa, Hawaii. Officials say a small eruption has occurred at the Kilauea volcano summit, producing an ash plume that reached about 7,000 feet. The County of Hawaii issued a civil defense message early Monday about the eruption and warning that the ash plume could affect surrounding areas.

AP/ PTI

Peter Vance, 24, photographs lava erupting in the Leilani Estates subdivision near Pahoa, Hawaii. Hawaii residents covered their faces with masks after a volcano menacing the Big Island for weeks exploded, sending a mixture of pulverized rock, glass and crystal into the air in its strongest eruption of sandlike ash in days.

AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

Brittany Kimball watches as lava erupts from a fissure near Pahoa, Hawaii. Two fissures that opened up in a rural Hawaii community have merged to produce faster and more fluid lava. Scientists say the characteristics of lava oozing from fissures in the ground has changed significantly as new magma mixes with decades-old stored lava.

AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

Members of the media record a wall of lava entering the ocean near Pahoa, Hawaii. Kilauea volcano, oozing, spewing and exploding on Hawaii's Big Island, has gotten more hazardous in recent days, with rivers of molten rock pouring into the ocean and flying lava causing the first major injury.

AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

In this photo released by the U.S. Geological Survey, lava flows from fissures near Pahoa, Hawaii. Kilauea volcano began erupting more than two weeks ago and has burned dozens of homes, forced people to flee and shot up plumes of steam from its summit that led officials to distribute face masks to protect against ash particles.

U.S. Geological Survey via AP

Lindsey Magnani and her son Kahele Rodrigues, 2, listen as an official shows them how to use a respirator that was given to them to help protect against ash from Kilauea volcano, in Volcano, Hawaii. Free respirators were being handed out to communities around the volcano after it erupted, sending a plume of ash about 30,000 feet into the air.

AP Photo/Caleb Jones

A slow camera shutter speed catches the lights of cars passing spectators sitting in a car off the side of Hwy 137 to watch the volcanic activity from the Malama Ki and Lelani Estates neighborhoods, near Pahoa, Hawaii.

AP Photo/Marco Garcia

Volcanic activity from the Malama Ki and Leilani Estates neighborhoods glows in the distance from Hwy 137, near Pahoa, Hawaii.

AP Photo/Marco Garcia

Cones and signs warn of cracks in the road caused by earthquakes near the entrance to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, near Volcano, Hawaii.

AP Photo/Caleb Jones

Clouds, ash and volcanic gases hang over Hawaii's Big Island, after Kilauea volcano erupted from the summit crater earlier in the day.

AP Photo/Caleb Jones

This aerial image released by the U.S. Geological Survey, shows Fissure 17 at about 07:00 a.m. HST., in Pahoa, Hawaii. The HVO field crew reported that the spattering height and intensity at Fissure 17 seemed to have intensified slightly but the length of active spattering in the fissure is shorter.

U.S. Geological Survey via AP

This image provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows a view of the ash plume resulting from an early morning explosion at Kilauea Volcano, in Hawaii.

AP/PTI

People watch as ash rises from the summit crater of Kilauea volcano, in Volcano, Hawaii.

AP Photo/Caleb Jones

Lava shoots into the night sky from active fissures on the lower east rift of the Kilauea volcano, near Pahoa, Hawaii.

AP Photo/Caleb Jones

This image provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows sulfur dioxide plumes rising from fissures along the rift and accumulating in the cloud deck, viewed from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory overflight in the morning at 8:25 a.m., HST near Pahoa, Hawaii.

U.S. Geological Survey via AP

This image provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows lava spattering from an area between active Fissures 16 and 20 photographed at 8:20 a.m. HST, on the lower east rift of the Kilauea volcano, near Pahoa, Hawaii. Plumes range from 1 to 2 kilometers (3,000 to 6,000 feet) above the ground. Officials say some vents formed by Kilauea volcano are releasing such high levels of sulfur dioxide that the gas poses an immediate danger to anyone nearby.

AP/PTI

Hannique Ruder, a 65-year-old resident living in the Leilani Estates subdivision, stands on the mound of hardened lava near Pahoa, Hawaii. Kilauea has destroyed more than 35 structures since it began releasing lava from vents about 25 miles east of the summit crater.

AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

Visitors take pictures as Kilauea's summit crater glows red in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii.

AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

This photo shows an aerial view of the East Rift Zone, along which the Leilani Estates neighborhood sits, from the ongoing Kilauea eruption, as seen from a helicopter flying around Pahoa, Hawaii.

Cindy Ellen Russell/Honolulu Star-Advertiser via AP

In this photo shows an aerial view of the East Rift Zone, along which the Leilani Estates neighborhood sits, from the ongoing Kilauea eruption, as seen from a helicopter flying in Pahoa, Hawaii.

Cindy Ellen Russell/Honolulu Star-Advertiser via AP

Visitors watch as steam and gas rise from Kilauea's summit crater in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii.

AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

This photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows a Hawaii Volcano Observatory geologist recording a temperature of 103 degrees C (218 degrees F) at a crack along Nohea Street in Leilani Estates near the town of Pahoa, Hawaii. Geologists warned that Hawaii's Kilauea volcano could erupt explosively and send boulders, rocks and ash into the air around its summit in the coming weeks.

U.S. Geological Survey via AP

First Lt. Aaron Hew Len, of the U.S. National Guard, tests air quality near cracks that are emitting toxic gasses from a lava flow in the Leilani Estates subdivision near Pahoa, Hawaii. Scientists confirm that volcanic activity has paused at all 12 fissures that opened up in a Hawaii community and oozed lava that burned 35 structures.

AP Photo/Caleb Jones

A fissure erupts near the intersection of Kahukai Street and Leilani Avenue in Leilani Estates, in Pahoa, Hawaii. Hawaii County officials issued mandatory evacuation orders for two neighborhoods — Leilani Estates and Lanipuna Gardens — when the lava first emerged. There are 14 lava-producing fissures in Leilani Estates, after two new ones formed Tuesday.

Hollyn Johnson/Hawaii Tribune-Herald via AP

Steam and sulfur rises from cracks in Moku Street at the head of a driveway in Leilani Estates, in Pahoa, Hawaii. Police have gone door-to-door to evacuate residents near two new vents emitting dangerous volcanic gases in Hawaii. The vents emerged near the spots where lava has been pouring into streets and backyards for the past week.

Hollyn Johnson/Hawaii Tribune-Herald via AP

In this photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows the lava lake at the summit of Kilauea near Pahoa, Hawaii. Hawaii's erupting Kilauea volcano has destroyed homes and forced the evacuations of more than a thousand people.

U.S. Geological Survey via AP

In this image from a research camera mounted in the observation tower at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, shows the summit of the Kilauea volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii. Lava shooting out of openings in the ground have already destroyed nearly half a dozen homes while some 1,700 people who evacuated the area face the possibility of not being able to return for a long time.

U.S. Geological Survey via AP

A line of traffic is seen going towards Pahoa town, near Pahoa, Hawaii. Scientists reported lava spewing more than 200 feet (61 meters) into the air in Hawaii's recent Kilauea volcanic eruption, and some of the more than 1,700 people who evacuated prepared for the possibility they may not return for quite some time.

AP Photo/Marco Garcia

A structure is seen atop the 1990 lava flow from Kilauea, one of the world's most active volcanoes in Kalapana, Hawaii. Kilauea has been erupting continuously since 1983. Kilauea hasn't been the kind of volcano that shoots lava from its summit into the sky, causing widespread destruction. It tends to ooze lava from fissures in its sides.

AP Photo/Marco Garcia

Lava burns across a road in the Leilani Estates subdivision near Pahoa, Hawaii.

AP Photo/Caleb Jones

Lava burns across a road as an offering to the volcano goddess lies in the foreground in the Leilani Estates subdivision near Pahoa, Hawaii. Glowing plumes of lava have shot hundreds of feet into the air at points, officials said, and black-and-orange ribbons of rock have curled into roadways.

AP Photo/Caleb Jones

This photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, shows Fissure 7 in Pahoa, Hawaii. At the peak of its activity, large bubble bursts occurred at one spot, lower left, in the fissure while spattering was present in other portions. The number of homes destroyed by lava shooting out of openings in the ground created by Hawaii's Kilauea volcano climbed to nine as some of the more than 1,700 people who evacuated prepared for the possibility they may not return for quite some time.

U.S. Geological Survey via AP

Volcanic gases pour out of a fissure in the Leilani Estates, in Pahoa, Hawaii. The powerful gases destroyed the nearby vegetation.

AP Photo/Marco Garcia

Lava approaches a city bus stop at the Leilani Estates, in Pahoa, Hawaii. The Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory said eight volcanic vents opened in the Big Island residential neighborhood of Leilani Estates since Thursday.

AP Photo/Marco Garcia

Leilani Estates resident Sam Knox watches the lava stretch across the road in Pahoa, Hawaii. Knox's home is less than a few hundred yards from the lava flow and he does not have any plans to evacuate. Knox is hopeful the lava will not take his home.

AP Photo/Marco Garcia

A man films the lava in the Leilani Estates subdivision in Pahoa, Hawaii. Hundreds of people on the Big Island of Hawaii are hunkering down for what could be weeks or months of upheaval as the dangers from an erupting Kilauea volcano grow.

AP Photo/Marco Garcia

Resident Sam Knox rides his bicycle to the edge of the road as lava burns across the road in the Leilani Estates in Pahoa, Hawaii.

AP Photo/Marco Garcia

Fumes come out of cracks on the asphalt road near the Leilani Estates in Pahoa, Hawaii. Lava spurted from volcanic vents, toxic gas filled the air and strong earthquakes, including a magnitude 6.9 temblor on Friday, rocked an already jittery population.

AP Photo/Marco Garcia

This photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows a crack in Pohoiki Road just east of Leilani Street in the Leilani Estates subdivision in Pahoa, Hawaii. Hundreds of people on the Big Island of Hawaii are hunkering down for what could be weeks or months of upheaval as the dangers from an erupting Kilauea volcano grow.

U.S. Geological Survey via AP

In this photo provided by U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, who is on active duty Hawaii National Guard deployment, ash from the Puu Oo vent on Kilauea volcano rises into the air, near Pahoa, Hawaii. Hawaii's erupting Kilauea volcano has destroyed homes and forced the evacuations of more than a thousand people.

U.S. Rep. Tusli Gabbard/National Guard via AP

Lava glows from a vent on a lava bed at the Leilani Estates in Pahoa, Hawaii. The Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory said eight volcanic vents opened in the Big Island residential neighborhood of Leilani Estates since Thursday.

AP Photo/Marco Garcia

A new fissure erupts in Leilani Estates in Pahoa, Hawaii. Hawaii's erupting Kilauea volcano has destroyed homes and forced the evacuations of more than a thousand people.

U.S. Geological Survey via AP

In this photo released by U.S. Geological Survey, lava is shown burning in Leilani Estates subdivision near the town of Pahoa on Hawaii's Big Island in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

U.S. Geological Survey via AP

In this photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, ash rises from the Puu Oo vent on Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano after a magnitude-5.0 earthquake struck the Big Island, in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

Kevan Kamibayashi/U.S. Geological Survey via AP

In this photo released by U.S. Geological Survey, a plume of ash rises from the Puu Oo vent on Hawaii's Kilaueaa Volcano after a magnitude 5.0 earthquake in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Hawaii's Kilauea volcano erupted sending lava shooting into the air in a residential neighborhood and prompting mandatory evacuation orders for nearby homes.

U.S. Geological Survey via AP

A U.S. Army Chinook departs as evacuees queue in line in Haena, Kauai. Hundreds of people have been airlifted out of dangerous floodwaters on the Hawaiian island of Kauai, but authorities said Tuesday that others are still stranded at evacuation centers.

Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser via AP

Gregg Fraser, owner of Opakapaka Bar and Grille, points to a spot where floodwater ravaged the pavement and lifeguard station at Ke'e Beach in Haena, Kauai. Hundreds of people have been airlifted out of dangerous floodwaters on the Hawaiian island of Kauai, but authorities said that others are still stranded at evacuation centers.

Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser via AP

In this image taken from video shows flooding along Kauai's Hanalei Bay, Hawaii. Hawaii Gov. David Ige issued an emergency proclamation for the island where heavy rainfall damaged or flooded dozens of homes in Hanalei, Wainiha, Haena and Anahola.

Petty Officer 3rd Class Brandon Verdura/U.S. Coast Guard via AP

This image taken from video provided by the U.S. Coast guard shows flooding in Kauai's Hanalei Bay, Hawaii. Hawaii Gov. David Ige issued an emergency proclamation for the island where heavy rainfall damaged or flooded dozens of homes in Hanalei, Wainiha, Haena and Anahola.

Petty Officer 3rd Class Brandon Verdura/U.S. Coast Guard via AP

U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump offer flowers at the USS Arizona Memorial at the Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam, Hawaii. Trump begins a five country trip through Asia traveling to Japan, South Korea, China, Vietnam and the Philippines.

AP/PTI

From front left to tight, Sarah Crowley, of Australia, Daniela Ryf, of Switzerland, and Lucy Charles, of England, wave to the gallery after finishing third, first, and second, respectively, at the Ironman World Championship Triathlon, in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii.

AP Photo/Marco Garcia

Athletes start in the swim race at the Ironman World Championship Triathlon, in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii.

AP/PTI

The USS Arizona Memorial is viewed in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, before a ceremony with Nippon Izokukai, the Bereaved Family Association of Japan.

AP Photo/Caleb Jones

The rusted hull of the USS Arizona is viewed in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. With the rusted hull of the USS Arizona beneath them, the group laid flowers and a wreath at the memorial after touring the Pacific Aviation Museum and the USS Missouri at Pearl Harbor.

AP Photo/Caleb Jones