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Gyanvapi Mosque: ASI To Continue Survey For The Fourth Day Amid Tight Security

A 55-member ASI team continued the survey work of the Gyanvapi Mosque in Varansai on Sunday to determine if the 17th-century mosque was built on a pre-existing temple.

ASI team at Gyanvapi mosque
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The Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) will continue its survey of the Gyanvapi Mosque complex in Varanasi for the fourth consecutive day on Monday. A 55-member ASI team continued the survey work on Sunday to determine if the 17-century mosque was built on a pre-existing temple amid tight security.

Speaking to ANI, Sudhir Tripathi, advocate representing the Hindu side said, "Survey work is under progress. Anjuman Intezamia Committee is also cooperating with the survey. There can be a little delay to start the survey as today is the fifth Monday of 'Sawan' month."

On submission of the report of the findings of the survey, Subhash Nandan Chaturvedi, Advocate representing the Hindu side, said, "ASI is conducting the survey in a systematic and scientific manner. Measurements are being done, it will take some time. They will submit the report in the court after the survey is completed."

Earlier, a counsel on the Hindu part claimed that during the 3D imaging, framing, and scanning inside the Gyanvapi basement, a few pieces of idols and remains of the ancient temple were found, with the Muslim side rubbishing the claims.

In a recent order, the Supreme Court upheld the order of the Allahabad High Court that an ASI survey must be done on the premises which will benefit both sides. The survey team conducted an assessment of the basement and all three tombs doing measurement, mapping and photography work during the third day of the exercise.

The district judge had ordered an ASI survey of the Gyanvapi mosque on July 21, instructing the agency to submit its report by August 4. Later the court on Saturday granted the ASI four weeks’ time to submit the report when the government counsel sought time for the agency to conduct the survey, arguing that after the July 21 order, the exercise was halted due to a directive from the apex court.
 

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