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Indian-Americans Condemn Hate Speech Against Hindus In Canada, Demand Action

The controversy intensified after Prime Minister Trudeau's insinuations about the potential involvement of Indian agents in the killing of Khalistani extremist Hardeep Singh Nijjar on Canadian soil.

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Khalistan supporters protest in US
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A coalition of influential Indian-Americans has denounced the surge in hostile rhetoric against Hindus in Canada, urging the Canadian government to address the issue promptly. The call for action follows the circulation of an inflammatory video from a pro-Khalistan group, threatening Hindu Canadians with expulsion from the country.

Expressing concern over the recurring threats and acts of Hinduphobia on Canadian soil, Professor Indu Vishwanathan, co-founder of Understanding Hinduphobia at the Hindu University of America, emphasized that remaining silent in the face of such actions is tantamount to endorsing hate crimes. Meanwhile, Khanderao Kand from the Foundation for India and Indian Diaspora Studies (FIIDS) urged Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to distinguish between freedom of expression and the promotion of terror, emphasizing the need to combat radicalization and criminal activities PTI reported. 

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The controversy intensified after Prime Minister Trudeau's insinuations about the potential involvement of Indian agents in the killing of Khalistani extremist Hardeep Singh Nijjar on Canadian soil. India swiftly rejected these allegations as baseless. Despite the Canadian government's assertion that acts of aggression and hate have no place in the country, no concrete action has been taken in response to the circulated video.

Dr. Sampath Shivangi, Chair of Government Affairs for the American Association of Physicians of Indian Origin, called upon US President Joe Biden and Congress to intervene, urging Canada to safeguard its Indian population, Hindus, and numerous Indian students from the threats. Addressing concerns about the potential spill-over of tensions to the US, Bharat Barai, a prominent Indian American leader based in Chicago, remained cautiously optimistic, characterizing Khalistanis as a small, misguided minority involved in various criminal activities.

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Prominent Sikh figures, such as Sukhi Chahal of Khalsa Today and Gurpatwant Singh Pannun, the chief of the banned outfit Sikhs for Justice, disassociated themselves from radical elements, emphasizing the unity of humanity in Sikhism. Pannun's threats were specifically disapproved, with calls for solidarity and respect among all communities. Sri Iyer, editor of the US-based PGurus portal, warned against the thin line between freedom of speech and hate speech, asserting that Pannun had crossed it with his threats against Hindu Canadians.

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