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Earth Hour 2023: 'The Biggest Hour For Earth' To Be Held Today, Here Is All You Need To Know

It has been described as one of the world's largest grassroots movements for the environment, which sees an engagement of people in more than 180 countries and territories, switching off their lights to show support for our ‘blue’ planet

The “Earth Hour” was first held in Sydney on March 31, 2007
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At 8:30 pm today, millions of people across the globe will observe “Earth Hour” by switching off their lights and electric appliances at their homes and offices for an hour, in an annual effort to raise awareness about climate change challenges and energy conservation. 

W​orld Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) which started the tradition, points out that the next seven years are crucial for halting irreversible nature loss and climate change. This year’s Earth Hour, it says, is needed more than ever, to inspire millions more to act, and make millions more take notice. 

The global efforts come hot on the heels of the historic Kunming-Montreal Agreement at COP15, which in December last year committed the world to halting and reversing biodiversity loss by 2030, the WWF said. 

What is “Earth Hour”?

Earth Hour will be observed between 8.30 pm to 9:30 pm as per the local time zones with people across the globe switching off non-essential lights for an hour to raise awareness about energy conservation. Earth Hour is observed on the last Saturday in March. 

It has been described as one of the world's largest grassroots movements for the environment, which sees an engagement of people in more than 180 countries and territories, switching off their lights to show support for our ‘blue’ planet.

The history of "Earth Hour" 

The tradition was started by the WWF to encourage people across the globe to raise awareness about energy conservation.

The “Earth Hour” was first held in Sydney on March 31, 2007, when the WWF encouraged 2.2 million people to turn off the lights for one hour to support action on climate change. 

The symbolic event has been held every year since then between the second-to-last and last weekend of March, “...which is around the time of the Spring and Autumn equinoxes in the northern and southern hemispheres respectively, which allows for near coincidental sunset times in both hemispheres, thereby ensuring the greatest visual impact for a global ‘lights out’ event,” the WWF points out.

Famous landmarks switch off lights

During this year's ‘Earth Hour’, the lights-out moment is also expected to be observed by major tourist spots and landmarks across countries. The Empire State Building, the Eiffel Tower and Sydney Opera House were among those who switched off their lights during the past few years and are expected to be participating this year as well, according to the WWF. 

Face of the campaign in India 

Three-time Grammy award winning composer and environmentalist Ricky Kej has been named as the ‘Face of Earth Hour India 2023,’ who with support from WWF India, will spread awareness about the campaign so that more people can join the 60 minutes of global unity.  With him, renowned sand artist Sudarsan Pattnaik, celebrity chef Ranveer Brar and musician Nakash Aziz have been named as goodwill ambassadors for the campaign. 
 

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