United States

Bald Eagles Are Back In US, New Jersey To Delist The Species From Endangered List

New Jersey proposed to remove the bald eagle from its endangered species list after four decades of efforts in wildlife conservation.

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Bald eagle Photo: Pinterest
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New Jersey has proposed to remove the bald eagle from its endangered species list on Monday. This decision comes after efforts of four decades made by the state in wildlife conservation.

 In the early 1980s, New Jersey had just one nesting pair of bald eagles clinging to survival in a remote county. Use of pesticide DDT is said to the reason is said to be the reason of decline as it impacted the birds' reproduction through eggshell thinning. However, a combination of factors led to this great comeback.

New Jersey has proposed to remove the bald eagle from its endangered species list on Monday. This decision comes after efforts of four decades made by the state in wildlife conservation.

In the early 1980s, New Jersey had just one nesting pair of bald eagles clinging to survival in a remote county. Use of pesticide DDT is said to the reason is said to be the reason of decline as it impacted the birds' reproduction through eggshell thinning. However, a combination of factors led to this great comeback.

New Jersey also brought in eagles from Canada and implemented programs like artificial incubation and fostering. These efforts have paid off in a big way. By 2023, the state boasted a thriving bald eagle population with 267 nesting pairs found in every county.

Osprey
Osprey Photo: Pinterest
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Along with bald eagle, the state has also decided to remove the name of osprey from the list of threatened species. Often called ‘fish hawks’, osprey are found along shoreline. They were also affected by DDT and their number of nests fell to about 50 five decades ago. In 2023, the state documented a record 800 occupied osprey nests.

The proposed delisting reflects the successful recovery of both bald eagles and ospreys. These birds are no longer in danger of disappearing from New Jersey.

The public can comment on the proposal until August 2.

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