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India Stops Water Flow To Pakistan As Shahpur Kandi Barrage Is Complete

The Shahpur Kandi Barrage, a project vital for irrigation and hydropower generation, faced numerous challenges over the past three decades.

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Water dam (representative image)
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India has successfully stopped the flow of water from the Ravi River to Pakistan following the completion of the Shahpur Kandi Barrage, situated on the border of Punjab and Jammu and Kashmir.

Media reports confirm that the completion of this crucial project marks a shift in water allocation, benifitting the Jammu and Kashmir region.

The Shahpur Kandi Barrage, a project vital for irrigation and hydropower generation, faced numerous challenges over the past three decades.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi prioritized this project, recognizing its potential to irrigate thousands of acres of agricultural land in Jammu and Kashmir, according to Union Minister Jitendra Singh.

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The agreement to resume work on the Shahpur-Kandi dam project was signed between Jammu and Kashmir and Punjab on September 8, 2018, after lingering in suspension for over 40 years.

This development is in line with the Indus Water Treaty signed between India and Pakistan in 1960, granting India exclusive rights over the waters of the Ravi, Sutlej, and Beas rivers.

The completion of the Shahpur Kandi Barrage allows India to utilize the Ravi River's water, redirecting the previously allocated share that flowed towards Pakistan.

This move will contribute to agricultural and economic growth in Jammu and Kashmir and Punjab.

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Former Prime Minister PV Narasimha Rao laid the foundation stone for the Shahpur Kandi Barrage Project in 1995. Disputes between the governments of Jammu and Kashmir and Punjab led to a suspension lasting over four and a half years.

With the Shahpur Kandi Barrage's completion, India can harness the water resources from the Ravi River, contributing to agricultural development in the Kathua and Samba districts, reported the Times Of India.

The region will now receive 1,150 cusecs of water, benefiting over 32,000 hectares of land.

Moreover, Jammu and Kashmir will obtain 20% of the hydel power generated from the dam, marking a significant step towards self-sufficiency.

The Shahpur Kandi Dam, standing at 55.5 meters high, is part of a multi-purpose river valley project, featuring two hydel power projects with a total installed capacity of 206 MW.

Positioned 11 km downstream of the Ranjit Sagar Dam Project, this development signifies a strategic shift in water management, contributing to regional prosperity.

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