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India, Pak Maintain Tradition Of Exchanging Nuclear Installations List; Here Is All About Agreement

India and Pakistan maintained a tradition dating back to 1992 despite relations between the two neighbours being at an all-time low.

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India Pakistan relations.(File photo-Representational image)
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India and Pakistan on Monday exchanged lists of nuclear installations that cannot be attacked in the event of hostilities.

Both the nations maintained a tradition dating back to 1992 despite relations between the two neighbours being at an all-time low.

The lists of nuclear facilities were simultaneously exchanged through diplomatic channels in New Delhi and Islamabad in line with the provisions of the Agreement on the Prohibition of Attack against Nuclear Installations and Facilities, the external affairs ministry said in a brief statement.

Both sides do not disclose details of the nuclear installations.

What is the agreement on nuclear installations between India and Pakistan?

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The agreement was signed on December 31, 1988 and entered into force on January 27, 1991. It stipulates that India and Pakistan should inform each other about the nuclear installations and facilities to be covered under the pact on the first of January of every calendar year.

This was the 33rd consecutive exchange of such lists between the two countries, the first one having taken place on January 1, 1992.

India, Pakistan relations:

India and Pakistan have not had any formal or sustained talks since they ended the so-called composite dialogue in the aftermath of the 2008 Mumbai attacks carried out by a 10-member team of the Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT), a terror group based in Pakistan. The attacks killed 166 people and injured scores.

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The political leadership of both sides made attempts to resume contact, though these efforts were derailed by a string of terror attacks based on Pakistan-based groups. India and Pakistan came close to hostilities following the 2019 Pulwama suicide attack that was blamed on the Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM).

A series of back-channel contacts, primarily involving intelligence and security officials meeting in third countries, led to the revival of the ceasefire on the Line of Control (LoC) in February 2021.
 

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