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'Use And Throw' Part Of Nitish Kumar's Work Culture: Chirag Paswan

Paswan also criticised the law and order situation in Bihar, alleging the state has gradually receded into anarchy. Kumar's silence has only emboldened criminals, he said, reiterating his demand for the President's rule there.

Chirag Paswan
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Lok Janshakti Party (Ram Vilas) leader Chirag Paswan on Tuesday mocked Bihar Chief Minister Nitish Kumar for his claim that he will rather die than realign with the BJP again, saying "use and throw" is part of his work culture and the JD(U) leader had made similar remarks in the past.

Speaking to reporters in Parliament complex, Paswan said Kumar can't be trusted as he has repeatedly "used" parties and people in pursuit of power and had dumped the RJD, his current ally, and the BJP earlier too by making similar assertion of never tying up with them again. "Use and throw is part of his culture. This is the way he also treated leaders like George Fernandes and Sharad Yadav. He is also treating Upendra Kushwaha in a similar manner," he said.

Kushwaha had joined the JD(U) last year after it broke ties with the BJP but has now rebelled against him. Kumar had on Monday asserted that he will "rather die" than realign with the BJP after the saffron party said there will be no alliance with the "unpopular" Janata Dal (United) leader.

Paswan also criticised the law and order situation in Bihar, alleging the state has gradually receded into anarchy. Kumar's silence has only emboldened criminals, he said, reiterating his demand for the President's rule there. The LJP leader also targeted Kumar for often claiming in public following some incidents that he was not aware of them. If that is the case, then why is he in power, Paswan asked and said that the chief minister should quit.

Paswan also praised President Droupadi Murmu's address to the joint sitting of Parliament. She had eloquently highlighted as to how the central government is developing the country in different aspects while harmonising the ancient India with modernity.

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