International

Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu Acknowledges ‘Tragic Mistake’ After Rafah Camp Strike

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has acknowledged that a “tragic mistake” had been made after an Israeli strike in the southern Gaza city of Rafah.

AP
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu | Photo: AP
info_icon

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday acknowledged that a “tragic mistake” had been made after an Israeli strike in the southern Gaza city of Rafah.

Yesterday late night, Israeli military carried out airstrikes on a camp for displaced people in Rafah in southern Gaza Strip late Sunday, reportedly killing at least 45 Palestinians hours after militant group Hamas fired a “large rocket barrage” at Tel Aviv, after maintaining months of lull.

“Despite our utmost efforts not to harm innocent civilians, last night, there was a tragic mistake,” Netanyahu said as per AP report.

He added, “We are investigating the incident and will obtain a conclusion because this is our policy.”

Gaza Health Ministry had said the dead included at least 12 women, eight children and three older adults, with another three bodies burned beyond recognition.

There has been widespread criticism to Israel over its war with Hamas, with even some of its closest allies, particularly the US, expressing outrage at civilian deaths. Israel insists it adheres to international law even as it faces scrutiny in the world’s top courts.

Earlier, Israel's military had said that it launched an investigation into civilian deaths after it struck a Hamas installation and killed two senior militants.

Rafah, the southernmost Gaza city on the border with Egypt, had housed more than a million people — about half of Gaza's population — displaced from other parts of the territory.

The strike on Rafah brought a new wave of condemnation, even from some of Israel's close allies.

Israel has denied allegations of genocide brought against it by South Africa at the International Court of Justice. Last week, the court ordered Israel to halt its offensive in Rafah, a ruling that it has no power to enforce.

Hamas triggered the war with its Oct. 7 attack into Israel, in which Palestinian militants killed some 1,200 people, mostly civilians, and seized some 250 hostages reportedly. Hamas still holds about 100 hostages and the remains of around 30 others after most of the rest were released during a cease-fire last year.

Around 80% of Gaza’s 2.3 million people have fled their homes, severe hunger is widespread and UN officials say parts of the territory are experiencing famine.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement