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Wikileaks

Julian Assange's father John Shipton speaks with a microphone on stage as supporters of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange take part in a protest outside the Central Criminal Court, the Old Bailey in London. Lawyers for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and the U.S. government were squaring off in a London court on Monday at a high-stakes extradition case delayed by the coronavirus pandemic. American prosecutors have indicted the 49-year-old Australian on 18 espionage and computer misuse charges over the WikiLeaks publication of secret U.S. military documents a decade ago. The charges carry a maximum sentence of 175 years in prison.

Photo by AP/PTI

Wikileaks founder Julian Assange leaves in a prison van after appearing at Westminster Magistrates Court, for an administrative hearing in London. Assange made a brief court appearance in his bid to prevent extradition to the United States to face serious espionage charges.

AP/PTI

Protesters hold banners outside Westminster Magistrates Court in London, where Julian Assange is due to appear. Protesters will be insisting that Assange should not be extradited to the US for his reporting of the Iraq and Afghanistan war. They insist he will not face a fair trial in the United States where the charges against him could result in imprisonment for 175 years. Assange will be transported from Belmarsh high-security prison.

AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth

People wear paper masks to protest against a possible extradition of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to the USA in front of the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, Germany.

Wolfgang Kumm/dpa via AP

British activist Lauri Love protests at the entrance of Westminster Magistrates Court in London. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is facing a court hearing over a U.S. request to extradite him for allegedly conspiring to hack a Pentagon computer. Assange is expected to appear by video link from prison for the hearing at London's Westminster Magistrates' Court.

AP Photo/Frank Augstein

Julian Assange greets supporters outside the Ecuadorian embassy in London. Sweden's top prosecutor says she is dropping an investigation into a rape claim against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange after almost seven years. Assange took refuge in Ecuador's embassy in London in 2012 to escape extradition to Sweden to answer questions about sex-crime allegations from two women.

AP Photo/Frank Augstein

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange gestures on the balcony of the Ecuadorian embassy prior to speaking, in London. Assange has won his battle against extradition to Sweden, which wanted to question him about a rape allegation. He has spent nearly five years inside the Embassy of Ecuador in London to avoid being sent to Sweden, which announced that the investigation has been discontinued.

AP Photo/Matt Dunham

This is an undated handout photo issued by Sunshine Press made available on May 10, 2016 of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange with a kitten in Ecuador's embassy in London . It may not be so lonely for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in the embassy quarters he's called home for nearly four years. Now he has a kitten to keep him company.The kitten had not been named yet.

AP/PTI

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is seen on a screen as he addresses the media from the London embassy of Ecuador, where he has been holed up for some 3½ years to avoid extradition to Sweden for questioning about alleged sexual offenses. A U.N. human rights panel says Assange has been "arbitrarily detained" by Britain and Sweden since December 2010. The U.N. Working Group on Arbitrary Detention said his detention should end and he should be entitled to compensation.

AP Photo/Frank Augstein

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange holds a U.N. report as he speaks on the balcony of the Ecuadorean Embassy in London. A U.N. human rights panel says WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who has been squirreled away inside the Ecuadorean Embassy in London to avoid questioning by Swedish authorities about sexual misconduct allegations, has been "arbitrarily detained" by Britain and Sweden since December 2010. The U.N. Working Group on Arbitrary Detention said his detention should end and he should be entitled to compensation.

AP/PTI Photo

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is seen on a screen as he addresses the media from the London embassy of Ecuador where he has been holed up for some 3½ years to avoid extradition to Sweden for questioning about alleged sexual offenses. A U.N. human rights panel says Assange has been "arbitrarily detained" by Britain and Sweden since December 2010. The U.N. Working Group on Arbitrary Detention said his detention should end and he should be entitled to compensation.

AP/PTI Photo

In this Aug. 18, 2014, file photo, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange speaks during a news conference with Ecuador's Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino, inside the Ecuadorian Embassy in London.

AP/PTI

A cement bust of America's most-wanted whistleblower Edward Snowden, once famously confiscated by police, returned to public display in New York to kick off a street art festival.

Courtesy: Twitter

A figure depicts Julian Assange on a cross on top of a supporter of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange during a vigil outside the Ecuadorian Embassy in London to mark his two years in refuge at the embassy. Julian Assange entered the embassy in June 2012 to gain political asylum to prevent him from being extradited to Sweden, where he faces allegations of sex crimes, which he denies.

AP Photo/Sang Tan

A supporter of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange holds a vigil outside the Ecuadorian Embassy in London to mark his two years of refuge at the embassy. Julian Assange entered the embassy in June 2012 to gain political asylum to prevent him from being extradited to Sweden, where he faces allegations of sex crimes, which he denies.

AP Photo/Sang Tan

FILE - In this Monday, July 29, 2013, file photo, Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted to a security vehicle outside of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md. U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning was acquitted of aiding the enemy for giving classified secrets to WikiLeaks.

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File

File: The late PM Rajiv Gandhi from a PIB handout picture of the 1980s. Congress trashed reports based on WikiLeaks claiming that late Rajiv Gandhi, much before becoming Prime Minister, may have been a middleman for a Swedish company trying to sell fighter aircraft to India.

Julian Assange, founder of WikiLeaks speaks to the media and members of the public from a balcony at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London. Assange who faces extradition to Sweden over sexual assault, claims which he denies, took refuge in the embassy in June.

AP Photo/ Kirsty Wigglesworth

In this Sept. 26, 2012 image taken from Russia Today, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange speaks inside Ecuador's embassy in London, Britain. Assange accused President Barack Obama of seeking to exploit the Arab uprisings for personal political gain, as he addressed a sideline meeting of the U.N. General Assembly via videolink from his hideout at the London embassy.

AP Photo/ Russia Today via AP video

WikiLeaks chief JULIAN ASSANGE, now in the UK and fighting extradition to Sweden, is offered asylum in Ecuador by President Rafael Correa. London is incensed, threatens an embassy raid.

Julian Assange, founder of WikiLeaks makes a statement from a balcony of the Equador Embassy in London. Assange called on United States President Barack Obama to end a "witch hunt" against the secret-spilling WikiLeaks organization.

AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth

Police stand guard outside the Ecuadorian Embassy, London. WikiLeaks chief Julian Assange has made a run for the Ecuadorean Embassy in London, seeking asylum in a long shot move that, if successful, would place him in a small, friendly South American country rather than in Sweden facing questioning about alleged sex crimes. June 19 unexpected caper has added a new and bizarre twist to Assange's increasingly desperate bid to avoid extradition to Scandinavia.

AP Photo/Tim Hales

A supporter of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who did not appear at court, holds placards bearing images of him after the verdict was given in his extradition case at the Supreme Court in London. Britain's Supreme Court has endorsed the extradition of WikiLeaks chief Julian Assange to Sweden, bringing the secret-spilling Internet activist a big step closer to prosecution in a Scandinavian court. Assange, 40, has spent the better part of two years fighting attempts to send him to the Sweden, where he is wanted for questioning in sex crime allegations. He has not been charged there.

AP Photo/ Matt Dunham

Julian Assange WikiLeaks founder arrives at the Supreme Court in London. Julian Assange took his extradition battle to Britain's Supreme Court, arguing that sending him to Sweden would violate a fundamental legal principle. The two-day hearing will be Assange's last chance to persuade British judges to quash efforts to send him to Scandinavia, where he is wanted on sex crime allegations.

AP Photo/ Lefteris Pitarakis

Julian Assange, the 40-year-old WikiLeaks founder, arrives at the Supreme Court in London. Assange's legal team is making a final effort at Britain's Supreme Court to avoid his extradition to Sweden. Assange is wanted by Swedish authorities over sex crimes allegations stemming from a visit to the country in 2010. He denies any wrongdoing.

AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth

Cold Starts
SHOW CAUSE Wikileaks man Julian Assange spent the better part of 2011 fighting extradition to Sweden on sex assault charges. The US squeeze begins to tell; operations are on hold.

REUTERS

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange makes a statement to media gathered outside the High Court in London. A British court Monday gave WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange permission to continue his legal battle to avoid extradition to Sweden over sex crimes allegations.

AP/PTI

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange gestures as he talks during a news conference in central London. The whistle-blowing website has released details of companies it says are selling information obtained by monitoring people's mobile phones and computers. According to Assange, more than 150 organizations around the world have the ability to use phones as tracking devices as well as intercept messages and listen to calls.

AP Photo/ Lefteris Pitarakis

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange gestures as he talks during a news conference in central London. The whistle-blowing website has released details of companies it says are selling information obtained by monitoring people's mobile phones and computers. According to Assange, more than 150 organisations around the world have the ability to use phones as tracking devices as well as intercept messages and listen to calls.

AP Photo/ Lefteris Pitarakis

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange talks to members of the media during a news conference in London. Assange said that financial problems may lead to the closure of the notorious secret-spilling site at the end of this year.

AP/PTI

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange talks to members of the media during a news conference in London. Assange said that financial problems may lead to the closure of the notorious secret-spilling site at the end of this year.

AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis

UP Chief Minister Mayawati addresses a press conference in Lucknow regarding the WikiLeaks report about her. Slamming the report, Mayawati alleged that its owner was either playing in the hands of her political opponents or had gone "mad". According to the WikiLeaks report on Mayawati, the chief minister was obsessed with security and that she had once dispatched a plane to get her favourite sandals from Mumbai.

PTI Photo/ Nand Kumar

WikiLeaks founder, Julian Assange, center, arrives at the High Court in London for his extradition appeal hearing. Assange is back in court for the latest installment in his fight against extradition to Sweden, where the 40-year-old Australian is accused of rape and molestation.

AP Photo/Sang Tan

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange listens during a public debate chaired by Jason Cowley, editor of the New Statesman, and hosted by the New Statesman and the Frontline Club at Kensington Town Hall in London.

AP/ PTI

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh (Second From Right), Lok Sabha Speaker Meira Kumar (L), senior BJP leader L K Advani (R) and Opposition leader Sushma Swaraj (Second From Left) after paying tribute to Ram Manohar Lohia on his birth anniversary, in the Central Hall of Parliament House in New Delhi. A united opposition mounted attack on Prime Minister Manmohan Singh over the cash-for-votes scam wondering as to how he could wash his hands of the matter as he had headed the government in 2008 and was the "biggest beneficiary" of the trust vote. Leader of the Opposition Sushma Swaraj made a stinging attack on Singh in the Lok Sabha telling him that as head of the government he should take responsibility instead of making others scapegoat for the omissions and commissions of his regime.

PTI Photo/ Kamal Singh

A TV Grab shows Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, Finance Minister Pranab Mukherjee and Parliamentary Affairs Minister Pawan K Bansal in the Lok Sabha in New Delhi. A united opposition mounted attack on Prime Minister Manmohan Singh over the cash-for- votes scam wondering as to how he could wash his hands of the matter as he had headed the government in 2008 and was the "biggest beneficiary" of the trust vote.

PTI Photo

TV Grab: Opposition leader Sushma Swaraj speaks in the Lok Sabha in New Delhi. A united opposition mounted attack on Prime Minister Manmohan Singh over the cash-for- votes scam wondering as to how he could wash his hands of the matter as he had headed the government in 2008 and was the "biggest beneficiary" of the trust vote.

PTI Photo

A TV Grab shows BJP members stage walk out in Lok Sabha in New Delhi. The WikiLeaks' expose on the cash-for-votes issue paralysed proceedings in Parliament with Opposition demanding immediate discussion on Prime Minister Manmohan Singh's statement on the matter.

PTI Photo

TV grab: Opposition leader Sushma Swaraj speaks in the Lok Sabha. Swaraj said that she has given privilege notice in Lok Sabha against Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on his statement on the Wikileaks revelation on the 2008 trust motion.

PTI Photo

A TV Grab shows BJP members create uproar over the WikiLeaks revelation on 'cash-for-vote' scam in Lok Sabha in New Delhi.

PTI Photo

File photo: A TV Grab shows BJP MPs Ashok Argal (R), Faggan Singh Kulaste (C) and Mahavir Bhagora (L), along with others, show the packets of money they have been allegedly bribed to switch sides in the Lok Sabha in New Delhi on July 2008. Strongly rejecting allegations of bribery during the 2008 Trust Vote, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh said nobody from the Congress or the government engaged in any "unlawful act" and the charges were "unverified and speculative".

PTI Photo

The founder of WikiLeaks Julian Assange arrives for his extradition hearing at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court in London. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is to appear in court to hear if he'll be extradited to Sweden to face sex-crimes allegations. Swedish prosecutors want to question Assange about accusations of sexual abuse from two women relating to a brief visit there last summer. He has denied any wrongdoing and has not been charged.

AP Photo/ Matt Dunham

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange leaves Belmarsh Magistrates' Court in London. Lawyers fighting over the extradition of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange returned to court to make their final arguments in a high-profile case that has threatened to overshadow the group's secret-spilling work.

AP Photo/Matt Dunham

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, right, arrives with his lawyer Jennifer Robinson, left, at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court in London. Assange is accused of sexual misconduct by two women he met during a visit to Stockholm last year and Swedish authorities want him extradited to face the allegations. A two-day hearing that begins will decide Assange's legal fate.

AP Photo/ Matt Dunham

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, left, accompanied by former Swiss banker Rudolf Elmer, right, are seen after Elmer handed Assange two CDs full of files, including names of 2,000 secret Swiss account holders, including individuals and corporates from Asia, US and Britain following a news conference at the Frontline Club in London. Elmer blew the whistle on the conduct of Julius Baer Bank in the Cayman Islands for which he is set to stand trial in Zurich, Switzerland, on Jan. 19 for breaching Swiss bank secrecy laws. The focus in India of course is already on whether or not there are any Indians in this list. A recent report by Global Financial Transparency said that India''s Rs 20.85 lakh crore have been deposited with Swiss Banks. There have also been media reports that some 250 Indian names were found in the Lichtenstein Bank list, and a list of 26 of the account holders has already been submitted by the government in Supreme Court, though it refuses to make it public, citing a double taxation treaty with Germany.

AP/PTI

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange arrives at Belmarsh Magistrate's court in London for his extradition hearing.

AP/PTI

Julian Assange Anarchist or liberator, web terrorist or www messiah? As 2010 turned into 2011, the debate raged around the WikiLeaks founder, even as the prospect of an unending stream of revelations gave world leaders the jitters.

Sandeep Adhwaryu

Congress party General Secretary Rahul Gandhi talks to party leader R.K. Dhawan at a party meeting in New Delhi. A leaked U.S. diplomatic cable has kicked up a political storm by quoting Gandhi as saying that Hindu radical groups may be a bigger threat to India than Muslim militant groups.

AP Photo/ Gurinder Osan

Julian Assange head of WikiLeaks takes a drink during a press conference at the home of Frontline Club founding member Vaughan Smith, at Bungay, England. Assange said he feared that the United States is getting ready to indict him, saying that he believed that a grand jury was meeting to consider charges against him. He has repeatedly voiced concerns that American authorities were getting ready to press charges over WikiLeaks' release of some 250,000 secret State Department cables, which have angered and embarrassed officials in Washington.

AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth

A cyclist rides past the main premises of Biocon, a biotech company in Bangalore. U.S. officials fear lax security at laboratories in India could make the facilities targets for terrorists seeking biological weapons to launch attacks across the globe, according to comments in a leaked U.S. diplomatic cable.

AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi

In this Nov. 29, 2008 file photo, a soldier takes cover as the Taj Mahal hotel burns during a gun battle between the military and militants inside the hotel in Mumbai. Pakistani officials are "hypnotically obsessed" with India's military, Foreign Secretary Nirupama Rao told U.S. officials in comments made public in a leaked U.S. diplomatic cable.

AP Photo/David Guttenfelder, File

Julian Assange head of WikiLeaks gestures as he gets back into a car at Beccles Police Station in Suffolk, England where he was complying with bail conditions.. Assange said he feared that the United States is getting ready to indict him, saying that he believed that a grand jury was meeting to consider charges against him. He has repeatedly voiced concerns that American authorities were getting ready to press charges over WikiLeaks' release of some 250,000 secret State Department cables, which have angered and embarrassed officials in Washington.

AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange holds up a court document for the media after he was released on bail, outside the High Court, London. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has been released on bail following a week of legal drama over his extradition.

AP Photo/ Kirsty Wigglesworth

Posters placed by supporters of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange are seen outside the High Court in London.

AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth

The founder of WikiLeaks Julian Assange arrives at the High Court in London for his bail hearing.

AP Photo/Matt Dunham

Christine Assange, mother of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (third from left) and his lawyer Mark Stephens face the media outside the High Court, London. Julian Assange will be freed on bail and sent to stay at a British country mansion, a judge ruled in favour of Assange, rejecting prosecutors' attempts to keep the WikiLeaks founder in prison as he fights extradition to Sweden.

AP Photo/Peter Macdiarmid, pool

Shot through tinted window, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange reacts from inside a prison van as he arrives at the High Court in London for his bail appeal hearing. Assange was granted conditional bail and is expected to be freed soon.

AP Photo/Sang Tan

A supporter of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, participates at a demonstration outside the Swedish Embassy In central London ahead of the hearing of Assange's extradition case to Sweden.

AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis

Left wing party activists hold placards during a protest against the detention of Julian Assange, the founder of secret-spilling website WikiLeaks, in Bhubaneswar. Assange remains in a British jail awaiting a hearing Dec. 14 at which he plans to fight Sweden's request to extradite him to face sex crimes allegations there.

AP Photo/Biswaranjan Rout

A supporters of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, wearing a mask depicting him and a US flag on his mouth, participates at demonstrate outside the Swedish Embassy In central London. Assange remains in a U.K. jail ahead of a Dec. 14 hearing where he plans to fight Sweden's request to extradite him to face sex crimes allegations there.

AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis

Protesters hold up images of WikiLeaks founder, Julian Assange, before a demonstration in Brisbane, Australia. WikiLeaks has been under intense pressure since it began publishing some 250,000 secret U.S. diplomatic cables, with attacks on its websites and threats against Assange, who is now in a British jail fighting extradition to Sweden on sex crime allegations.

AP Photo/Tertius Pickard

Hundreds of protesters march through Brisbane's city center to protest against the detention of WikiLeaks founder, Julian Assange, in Brisbane, Australia. WikiLeaks has been under intense pressure since it began publishing some 250,000 secret U.S. diplomatic cables, with attacks on its websites and threats against Assange, who is now in a British jail fighting extradition to Sweden on sex crime allegations.

AP Photo/Tertius Pickard

U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay gestures during a press conference at the United Headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland. The U.N.'s top human rights official, Pillay says she is concerned about reports of pressure on payment providers such as MasterCard to stop processing donations to WikiLeaks.

AP Photo/ Anja Niedringhaus

A man shows an inside page of Lebanon's daily Al-Akhbar carrying a report leaked by the website WikiLeaks, in Beirut's commercial Hamra street, Lebanon. Omar Nashabe, an editor of the Lebanese daily Al-Akhbar says the newspaper's website suffered severe technical problems after being attacked apparently over its publishing of leaked U.S. diplomatic cables.

AP Photo/Grace Kassab

Sandeep Adhwaryu

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, back to camera, is driven into Westminster Magistrates Court in London after being arrested on a European Arrest Warrant. Assange is appearing at the court for his extradition hearing for sexual assault allegations in Sweden.

AP Photo/ Stefan Rousseau/PA

Members of the media gather outside the rear entrance of Westminster Magistrates Court in London, where WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is scheduled appear on an extradition warrant. Assange surrendered to London police as part of a Swedish sex-crimes investigation, the latest blow to an organisation that faces legal, financial and technological challenges after releasing hundreds of secret U.S. diplomatic cables. If he challenges his extradition to Sweden, he will likely be remanded into custody or released on bail until another judge rules on whether to extradite him, a spokeswoman for the extradition department said on customary condition of anonymity.

AP Photo/ Kirsty Wigglesworth

File photo of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange as he speaks during a NGO conference, on Nov 5, 2010, in Geneva. Assange, who has been in hiding for nearly a week, was arrested on suspicion of rape after surrendering over a Swedish warrant, a move described as an attack on the freedom of press by his whistle-blower website that has leaked a cache of secret US cables.

AP Photo/Salvatore Di Nolfi, Keystone, File

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, right, speaks with Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi at the Russian Black sea resort of Sochi. Italy's prime minister is on an official visit to Russia against the background of a leaked U.S. diplomatic cable that alleges an uncomfortably close relationship between him Russian premier Vladimir Putin.

AP Photo/RIA Novosti, Vladimir Rodionov, Presidential Press Service

Whistle-Blower Julian Assange meets the press in Geneva

Reuters (From Outlook, December 13, 2010)

A man points towards the Wikileaks memos shown on a TV screen at an electronic shop in Karachi, Pakistan. Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari sought a pledge from the United Arab Emirates to allow his family long-term refuge, as they did for his late wife, if he died or was killed, according to a secret diplomatic cable released by WikiLeaks.

AP Photo/ Fareed Khan

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange speaks during a press conference in London. Assange said he believes there is evidence of war crimes in the thousands of pages of leaked U.S. military documents relating to the war in Afghanistan. The remarks came after WikiLeaks, a whistle-blowing group, posted some 91,000 classified U.S. military records over the past six years about the war online, including unreported incidents of Afghan civilian killings and covert operations against Taliban figures.

AP Photo/Lizzie Robinson, PA

Afghanistan's Ministry of Defence spokesman Gen. Mohammad Zahir Azimi, left, and NATO's International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) spokesman Gen. Josef Blotz brief journalists on recent media reports on leaked classified U.S. documents by the website Wikileaks, in Kabul, Afghanistan.

AP Photo/Sayed Wali, Pool