International

Russian Economy To Contract 3 Percent This Year: Central Bank

A wide array of foreign companies pulled out of Russia or scaled down their activities in the country after Russia sent troops into Ukraine in late February.

Central Bank building in Moscow, Russia
info_icon

The head of Russia's Central Bank said on Friday that the country's economy will contract by about 3 per cent this year, a sharp turnaround from its growth in 2021, the year before sanctions and company pullouts in the wake of the conflict in Ukraine. 

High inflation, worsening trade conditions during Ukraine war

Central Bank governor Elvira Nabiullina said following a bank board meeting that inflationary pressure remains elevated, citing “worsening trade conditions” as one factor. She said annualised inflation as of December was 12.7 per cent.

Russia's gross domestic product rose by about 4.8 per cent last year. 

A wide array of foreign companies pulled out of Russia or scaled down their activities in the country after Russia sent troops into Ukraine in late February. 

The European Union imposed a price cap this month on Russian oil, one of the country's key exports. Nabiullina said the effect of the price cap would be analyzed more thoroughly at the bank's February meeting.

Fear of Winter Escalations 

This comes after the Ukrainian authorities on Friday reported explosions in at least 3 cities, alleging "massive missile attacks" by the Russian side. 

Following the deadly missile attacks, Alexander Dugin, described by some as President Vladimir Putin's “brain," said that the ongoing war with Ukraine will end by either Moscow winning it or destroying the whole world. Ukraine has accused Russia of planning a wide-ranging ground offensive early in the New Year, despite recent Russian military setbacks.

This has raised fears of a fresh conflict in the now 10-month long conflict that started with the Kremlin's "special military operation" in Kyiv. 

(With inputs from AP)

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement