Monday, Aug 08, 2022
Outlook.com

5 Of Our Favourite Foods That May Disappear Due To Climate Change

We just heard that cult favorite hot sauce sriracha is going to be in short supply. This week, makers Huy Fong Foods announced that they are facing a shortage of chili peppers as a mega-drought in Mexico has disrupted the supply. Sriracha is not the only food that is facing a slow fade out due to climate change.

Changing weather conditions have affected chili production, forcing Huy Fong Foods to stop the produ
Changing weather conditions have affected chili production, forcing Huy Fong Foods to stop the produ Shutterstock

Changing weather and temperatures are impacting everything on this planet, including the food on our plates. Here are five regional foods from across the world that we may lose soon due to the damage we are causing to this planet.

California's Sriracha Sauce

If you love pouring this hot sauce over everything, you may want to stock up on your bottles - the world is facing a sriracha shortage. California-based Huy Fong Foods who make the green-capped sriracha hot sauce have announced that chili peppers supply has been impacted by changing climate and extreme weather. A drought in Mexico has disrupted the supply. What is even more alarming is that it is actually a decades-long 'megadrought'. Incidentally, the sauce has Thai origins, it comes from the seaside city of Si Racha in Thailand. But the one made by Huy Fong Foods is world famous. It was created a Chinese immigrant from Vietnam, David Tran.

Bengal's Nolen Gur

The smoky nolen gur is a prized delicacy from Bengal
The smoky nolen gur is a prized delicacy from Bengal Shutterstock

Those who have had it wax lyrical about the fragrance and smokiness of nolen gur. This liquid jaggery is a unique delicacy made from the sap of the date palm, and available only for a short period in winters in Bengal. However, nolen gur production has been slowly reducing over the past few years. The legendary taste too has been changing, all due to warming weather and incressing cyclones in the Bay of Bengal.

Colombia's Coffee

Farmers in Colombia have observed a change in coffee bean quality
Farmers in Colombia have observed a change in coffee bean quality Shutterstock

Colombia is known to produce some of the best coffee in the world, known for its mild yet rich aroma. In recent years, scientists and farmers in Colombia have reported that higher temperatures and shifting weather patterns has affected coffee production. Ethiopia - another country known for coffee - is also seeing climate change redefining coffee quality. These countries are witnessing 'coffee rust' fungus on plantations. 

Vermont's Maple Syrup

Various grades of maple syrup lined up on a window sill in Vermont
Various grades of maple syrup lined up on a window sill in Vermont Shutterstock

Did you know that Vermont produces one of the best maple syrups? The golden and pure syrup is sourced from wild grown maple trees which grow in the northeast landscape of the US (and parts of eastern Canada). It is made by collecting sap from the trees. And the quality of sap production is dependent on the weather conditions. According to Vermont’s Department of Health, “Vermont has been getting warmer and wetter” which has affected the productoion of maple syrup.

Napa Valley's Wine

The Napa Valley Wine Train transports people to various wineries throughout the valley.
The Napa Valley Wine Train transports people to various wineries throughout the valley. David A Litman / Shutterstock

Napa Valley has long been the heartland of high-end wine. But warming temperatures have led to vineyard grapes to ripen prematurely, thus reducing grape quality. Studies say that fluctuations in temperature and moisture levels in Europe, Australia, North American, and South Africa will affect wine. 

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