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Mexico Unearths 1,500 Years Old Mayan City Through A Giant Stone

The site is known as Xiol which translates to ‘the spirit of a man’ in Mexico

The site features the Mayan Puuc style of architecture, common in the southern Yucatan Peninsula
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A centuries-old Mayan city was rediscovered by the archaeologists working in the Yucatan region of Mexico. It is known as the city of Xiol which translates to the spirit of man in Mexico. According to reports, the site features the Mayan Puuc style of architecture which is common in the southern Yucatan Peninsula but it is rare to find near Merida.

Carlos Peraza, one of the archaeologists who headed the excavation of the city in an interview said that it was home to some 4,000 people who lived between 600 and 900 CE during the late classic period. “There were people from different social classes…priests, scribes, who lived in these great palaces, and there were also the common people who lived in small buildings,” Carlos said. Researchers also found burial grounds of adults and children - originating from modern day Guatemala – along with other belongings. Not just this, remains of marine life were also discovered. This highly suggests the existence of agriculture-based diets.

In 2018, the area was first discovered on the construction site of an industrial park. They have also rediscovered a series of palaces, pyramids and plazas. According to a report, Arturo Chab Cardenas, a delegate from the National Institute for Anthropology and History (INAH),” The discovery of this Mayan city is important for its monumental architecture and because it has been restored despite being located on private land.”

It all started with a stone. Mauricio Montalvo, one of the owners of land in Xiol said in an interview,” At first we saw a giant stone and as we excavated enormous buildings began to appear. It was incredible, so we informed INAH and then we realized the need to change our original plans because for our company, it's more important to preserve the Mayan heritage.”

Peraza continued,” With time, urban sprawl (in the area) has grown and many of the archaeological remains have been destroyed... but even we as archaeologists are surprised, because we did not expect to find a site so well preserved.”

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