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Libya

This photo provided by the International Organization for Migration shows migrants from four boats being returned to the shore in Tripoli, Libya.

AP/PTI Photo

Migrants and refugees from different African nationalities react on an overcrowded rubber boat, as aid workers of the Spanish NGO Open Arms approach them in the Mediterranean Sea, international waters, off the Libyan coast.

Photo by AP/PTI

People attend a funeral of military cadets in Tripoli, Libya. Health officials said the death toll from the airstrike climbed to at least 30 people, most of them students and over 30 others were wounded. The airstrike took place in the city's south late Saturday, an area which has seen heavy clashes in recent months. Forces based in eastern Libya and led by Gen. Khalifa Hifter have been fighting to seize the capital from the weak but U.N.-supported government.

AP/PTI

Debris covers the ground and an emergency vehicle after an airstrike at a detention center in Tajoura, east of Tripoli in Libya. An airstrike hit the detention center for migrants early Wednesday, killing several.

AP Photo/Hazem Ahmed

Smoke rises shortly after an attack on the foreign ministry building, in Tripoli, Libya. Security officials said that a suicide bomber targeted the entrance of Libya's Foreign Ministry in Tripoli, killing several people, including a prominent militia leader. They said a second attacker was shot dead by guards before he could detonate his explosive vest.

AP/PTI

A sick migrant from Egypt is given medical treatment on the deck of the Nuestra Madre de Loreto Spanish fishing vessel carrying 12 migrants rescued off the coast of Libya. Meanwhile, Spanish officials say they have rescued about 650 migrants from 16 boats crossing the Mediterranean from North Africa to Europe finding one dead woman among them.

AP Photo/Javier Fergo

Eritrean people shout slogans during a protest in Brussels. Protesters demanded international aid for Eritrean migrants stranded in Libya.

AP Photo/Francisco Seco

Fighters under the UN backed government shooting on the front lines during clashes in southern Tripoli. Authorities say the death toll from fighting between rival groups in the capital of Tripoli has climbed to about 100 including civilians.

AP/PTI

Migrants wait to be rescued off the coast of Libya, as rescuers throw life jackets at them and urge them to stay calm. Rescuers from the Spanish non -profit Open Arms saved 87 migrants off the coast of Libya in a dramatic nighttime operation. The group included eight minors.

AP Photo/Valerio Nicolosi

Rescue workers from the Proactiva Open Arms Spanish NGO retrieve the bodies of an adult and a child amid the drifting remains of a destroyed migrant boat off the Libyan coast. A migrant rescue aid group accused Libya's coast guard of abandoning three people in the Mediterranean Sea, including an adult woman and a toddler who died, after intercepting some 160 Europe-bound migrants near the shores of the northern African country.

AP/PTI

In this photo, released by the Libyan coast guard, African migrants who were on boats in distress in the Mediterranean on their way to Europe, and rescued by the Libyan coast guard arrive to shore, east of the capital, Tripoli, Libya. Four boats, boarding 490 African migrants including 75 women and 21 children, were intercepted on Sunday off the town of Gohneima.

Libyan Coast Guard via AP

Refugees and migrants wait to be rescued by members of the Spanish NGO Proactiva Open Arms, after leaving Libya trying to reach European soil aboard an overcrowded rubber boat, north of Libyan coast.

AP Photo/Felipe Dana

Refugees and migrants wait to be rescued by aid workers of the Spanish NGO Proactiva Open Arms, after leaving Libya trying to reach European soil aboard an overcrowded rubber boat, 60 miles north of Al-Khums, Libya.

AP Photo/Olmo Calvo

329 refugees and migrants, mostly from Eritrea and Bangladesh, wait to be rescued by aid workers after leaving Libya trying to reach European soil aboard an overcrowded wooden boat, 45 miles north of Al-Khums, Libya.

AP Photo/Santi Palacios

A rubber boat carrying migrants from different nationalities trying to leave the Libyan coast and reach European soil is spotted by a team of aid workers from the Spanish NGO Proactiva Open Arms, 28 miles north of Al Khums, Libya.

AP Photo/Santi Palacios

Migrants from a sinking inflatable boat try to get on a Libyan coast guard boat, left, during a rescue operation at sea.

AP/PTI

Migrants from a sinking inflatable boat try to get on a Libyan coast guard boat during a rescue operation at sea.

Lisa Hoffmann/Sea-Watch via AP

Migrants from a sinking inflatable dinghy try to get on a Libyan coast guard boat during a rescue operation at sea. Five migrants have died as a German nonprofit organization, Sea-Watch, and the Libyan coast guard tried to rescue them from their foundering boat in the Mediterranean, with each side blaming the other for botching the operation.

Lisa Hoffmann/Sea-Watch via AP

Ghanaian refugees Simon, left, and Peace hold their newborn baby girl onboard a Spanish rescue vessel on the Mediterranean Sea. The Ghanaian woman gave birth right after being rescued by members of the Spanish NGO ProActiva Open Arms while trying to cross the Mediterranean Sea from Libya to Italy.

AP Photo/Bram Janssen

Members of the Spanish NGO ProActiva Open Arms distribute life jackets to migrants as they rescue them from a rubber dinghy on the Mediterranean Sea. ProActiva Open Arms rescued more than 200 migrants from foundering rubber dinghies about 25 miles north of the Libyan coastal town of al-Khums.

AP Photo/Bram Janssen

Backdropped by an oil rig, an abandoned wooden boat floats in the Mediterranean Sea north of the Libyan coast. Rescuers from the Aquarius vessel of SOS Mediterranee and MSF (Doctors Without Borders) NGOs rescued seven persons from the boat which departed Libya the previous night.

AP Photo/Darko Bandic

Rescuers put a life jacked on a child during a search and rescue operation conducted by SOS Mediterranee and MSF (Doctors Without Borders) NGOs, in the Mediterranean Sea, north of Libyan coast.

AP Photo/Darko Bandic

NGO Open Arms conduct a rescue operation in the waters some 25 Nautical miles (29 miles, 46 kilometers) north of the Libyan coast. Some 120 migrants were rescued during the operation.

AP/PTI

Migrants wait to be rescued by aid workers of Spanish NGO Proactiva Open Arms in the Mediterranean Sea, about 15 miles north of Sabratha, Libya.

AP Photo/Santi Palacios

Libya's Prime Minister Fayez al-Sarraj of the U.N.-backed government, left, and General Khalifa Hifter of the Egyptian-backed commander of Libya's self-styled national army shake hands as France's President Emmanuel Macron stands between after a declaration at the Chateau of the La Celle-Saint-Cloud, west of Paris, France. President Emmanuel Macron is hosting a meeting of the two main rival leaders of chaotic Libya, trying to play peacemaker in a country where the stakes are high for both Europe and Africa.

AP Photo/Michel Euler

African migrants try to reach a rescue boat from the Spanish NGO Proactiva Open Arms, after falling from the punctured rubber boat in the Mediterranean Sea, about 12 miles north of Sabratha, Libya.

AP Photo/Santi Palacios

An African migrant tries to reach a rescue boat from the Spanish NGO Proactiva Open Arms, after being located sailing out of control on a punctured rubber boat in the Mediterranean Sea, about 12 miles north of Sabratha, Libya.

AP Photo/Santi Palacios

Men sit on the deck of the rescue vessel Golfo Azzurro after being rescued by Spanish NGO Proactiva Open Arms workers on the Mediterranean Sea. A Spanish aid organization Thursday rescued more than 600 migrants who were attempting the perilous crossing of the Mediterranean Sea to Europe in packed boats from Libya.

AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti

Migrants and refugees call out to Spanish NGO Proactiva Open Arms workers, after being located out of control sailing on a rubber boat in the Mediterranean Sea, about 18 miles north of Sabratha, Libya.

AP/PTI Photo

Refugees and migrants from different African countries wait to be assisted by an NGO aboard an overcrowded rubber boat, about 20 miles North of Sabratha, Libya. A rescue ship belonging to a Spanish NGO has saved 250 migrants in danger of capsizing near the Libyan coast. Proactiva Open Arms spokesperson Laura Lanuza says that the NGO's boat rescued the African migrants from two small rubber vessels that were at risk of being overwhelmed by the sea.

AP Photo/Santi Palacios

Sub-Saharan migrants sit on the deck of the Golfo Azzurro boat after been rescued from a rubber boat by members of Proactive Open Arms NGO, in the Mediterranean sea, about 24 miles north of Sabratha, Libya.

AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti

In this Jan. 13, 2017 photo, Idris 3, from Mali, center, sleeps next to his mother Aicha Keita, right, on the deck of the Golfo Azzurro vessel after being rescued from the Mediterranean sea, about 20 miles north of Ra's Tajura, Libya. Spain's maritime rescue service says the bodies of seven African migrants have been found dead along the Strait of Gibraltar since Friday.

AP Photo/Olmo Calvo

Migrants and refugees rest on the deck of a ship after being rescued, in the Mediterranean Sea off the coast of Libya.

AP Photo/Mstyslav Chernov

A fighter of the Libyan forces affiliated to the Tripoli government is helped by comrades after being shot by a sniper, in Sirte, Libya.

AP Photo/Manu Brabo

A fighter of the Libyan forces affiliated to the Tripoli government searches for sniper positions, from a building, on the front line in Sirte, Libya.

AP Photo/Manu Brabo

Migrants share a bowl of pasta during their lunch at the courtyard of a detention center for migrants, in the village of Karareem, around 50 km from Misrata, Libya.

AP Photo/Manu Brabo

Fighters of the Libyan forces affiliated to the Tripoli government rest and reload weapons during combats against Islamic State militant, in Sirte, Libya.

AP Photo/Manu Brabo

Migrants, most of them from Eritrea, jump into the water from a crowded wooden boat as they are helped by members of an NGO during a rescue operation at the Mediterranean sea, about 13 miles north of Sabratha, Libya. Thousands of migrants and refugees were rescued Monday morning from more than 20 boats by members of Proactiva Open Arms NGO before transferring them to the Italian cost guards and others NGO vessels operating at the zone.

AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti

A man holds himself on the side of a boat after jumping into the sea from a crowded wooden boat during a rescue operation at the Mediterranean sea, about 13 miles north of Sabratha, Libya. Thousands of migrants and refugees were rescued Monday morning from more than 20 boats by members of Proactiva Open Arms NGO before transferring them to the Italian cost guards and others NGO vessels operating at the zone.

AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti

In this photo, migrants from Nigeria and Ivory Coast rest on a vessel after being rescued by a Migrant Offshore Aid Station, MOAS team in the central Mediterranean Sea, close to the Libyan territorial waters.

AP Photo/Manu Brabo

In this file photo, refugees and migrants from Eritrea, Mali, Bangladesh and other countries wait on board a dinghy to be rescued in the Mediterranean Sea, 27 kilometers (17 miles) north of Sabratha, Libya.

AP Photo/Santi Palacios

In this Friday, May 27, 2016 photo, a Sea-Watch humanitarian organisation crew member holds a drowned migrant baby, during a rescue operation off the coasts of Libya. Survivor accounts have pushed to more than 700 the number of migrants feared dead in Mediterranean Sea shipwrecks over three days in the past week, even as rescue ships saved thousands of others in daring operations.

Christian Büttner/EIKON NORD GMBH GERMANY via AP

Sea-Watch humanitarian organization crew member holds a drowned refugee baby, during a rescue operation off the coasts of Libya. Survivor accounts have pushed to more than 700 the number of migrants feared dead in Mediterranean Sea shipwrecks over three days in the past week, even as rescue ships saved thousands of others in daring operations.

Christian Buttner/EIKON NORD GMBH GERMANY via AP

People jump out of a boat right before it overturns off the Libyan coast. The Italian navy says it has recovered 7 bodies from the overturned migrant ship off the coast of Libya. Another 500 migrants who on board were rescued safely.

Marina Militare via AP Photo

Men working for the Libyan Red Crescent recover bodies of drowned migrants from under the sand, on the beach in the Alqarbula area, east of the city of Tripoli, Libya. Workers for the Libyan Red Crescent collected nine bodies over two days after a boat sank off the east coast of the city of Tripoli.

AP Photo/Mohamed Ben Khalifa

In this photo, members of the Libyan Red Crescent carry a body bag as they retrieve bodies found washed up in the eastern shore of Tripoli, Libya. A spokesman for the Red Crescent said the bodies of at least 95 migrants have been found washed ashore over the past five days.

AP Photo/Mohamed Ben Khalifa

A policeman stands outside the residence of one of the four Indian nationals who was detained near the Libyan city of Sirte, in Hyderabad. Four Indian teachers, who were returning to India from Tripoli and Tunis, have been kidnapped in Libya, allegedly by the Islamic State terror group (IS).

AP Photo/ Mahesh Kumar A.

A migrants stretches his arm from the deck of the Belgian Navy Vessel Godetia after being rescued during a search and rescue mission in the Mediterranean Sea off the Libyan coasts. Hundreds of migrants were rescued by the Godetia, which is among a EU Navy vessels fleet taking part in the Triton migrants rescue operations.

AP Photo/ Gregorio Borgia

Migrants wait to disembark in the Sicilian harbor of Pozzallo, Italy. About 100 migrants, including 28 children, were rescued by a merchant vessel in the Sicilian Strait while they were trying to cross. Another smuggler's boat crammed with hundreds of people overturned off Libya's coast on Saturday as rescuers approached, causing what could be the Mediterranean's deadliest known migrant tragedy and intensifying pressure on the European Union to finally meet demands for decisive action.

AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino

An officer looks at a monitor showing the ships navigating the area where the boat believed to be crowded with perhaps as many as 700 migrants capsized in the waters north of Libya, in the operation room of the Coast Guard during the coordination of rescue efforts, in Rome.

Angelo Carconi/ANSA via AP

This undated image made from a video released by Islamic State militants, April 19, 2015, appears to show the killing of a group of captured Ethiopian Christians in Libya. The 29-minute video purportedly shows two groups of captives. It says one group is held by an IS affiliate in eastern Libya and the other by an affiliate in the south. A masked fighter delivers a long statement before the video switches between footage that purportedly shows the captives in the south being shot dead and the captives in the east being beheaded on a beach.

Militant video via AP

A man is comforted by others as he mourns over Egyptian Coptic Christians who were captured in Libya and killed by militants affiliated with the Islamic State group, outside of the Virgin Mary church in the village of el-Aour, near Minya, 220 kilometers south of Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian warplanes struck Islamic State targets in Libya in swift retribution for the extremists' beheading of a group of Egyptian Christian hostages on a beach, shown in a grisly online video released hours earlier.

AP Photo/ Hassan Ammar

This image made from a video released Sunday Feb. 15, 2015 by militants in Libya claiming loyalty to the Islamic State group purportedly shows Egyptian Coptic Christians in orange jumpsuits being led along a beach, each accompanied by a masked militant. Later in the video, the men are made to kneel and one militant addresses the camera in English before the men are simultaneously beheaded.

AP Photo

TV Grab: Fury in Egypt as IS 'beheads 21 Christians' in Libya.

TV Grab

Men whose relatives were abducted in Libya hold their photos in front of the foreign ministry in Cairo, Egypt.

AP Photo/Hassan Ammar

A Libyan honor guard stands at attention during the arrival of U.N. Special Envoy to Libya Bernardino Leon in Tripoli.

AP Photo/ Mohammed Ben Khalifa

Liberian soldiers keep order at a food distribution centre at the West Point area, one of the places where the Ebola virus has claimed lives, in Monrovia, Liberia.

AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh

Indians evacuated from Libya, on their arrival at IGI Airport, in New Delhi.

PTI Photo/ Kamal Kishore

Indians evacuated from Libya, on their arrival at Delhi airport.

PTI Photo/ Kamal Kishore

One of the 44 Kerala nurses, evacuated from Libya, on her arrival at the airport in Kochi.

PTI Photo

Kerala nurses, evacuated from Libya, being received by relatives on their arrival at the airport in Kochi. Relief writ large on their faces, 44 Indian nurses working in strife-torn Libya arrived this morning from Dubai even as four others are bound for different destinations in the country.

PTI Photo

Chinese nationals evacuated from Libya carry their baggage after arriving at a port of Piraeus, near Athens, Greece. A Greek navy frigate carrying embassy staff and nearly 200 people from Greece, China and other countries evacuated from the conflict in Libya returned to the port near Athens. The Greek Defense Ministry the ship transported 77 people from Greece, 78 from China, 10 from Britain, seven from Belgium, one each from Russia and Albania.

AP Photo/ Petros Giannakouris

Libyan women cross into Tunisia at the Ras Ajdir border post between Libya and Tunisia, southern Tunisia, after fleeing from Libya. Up to 6,000 people a day are fleeing Libya for neighboring Tunisia, the Tunisian foreign minister said, the biggest influx since Libya's 2011 civil war in a sign of the spiraling turmoil as rival militias battle over control of the airport in the capital Tripoli.

AP Photo/Ali Manssour

In this frame grab from video obtained from a freelance journalist traveling with the Misarata brigade, fighters from the Islamist Misarata brigade fire towards Tripoli airport in an attempt to wrest control from a powerful rival militia, in Tripoli, Libya. The battle for control of Tripoli's international airport began two weeks ago when Islamist-led militias - mostly from the western city of Misrata - launched a surprise assault on the airport, under control of rival militias from the western mountain town of Zintan. Heavy clashes in the country’s restive east between Libyan soldiers loyal to a renegade general and Islamist-led militias killed dozens of people including civilians, health officials said Sunday. On Saturday, the U.S. evacuated its diplomats in Tripoli to neighboring Tunisia and shut its embassy.

AP Photo/AP video

In this frame grab from video obtained from a freelance journalist traveling with the Misarata brigade, fighters from the Islamist Misarata brigade fire towards Tripoli airport in an attempt to wrest control from a powerful rival militia, in Tripoli, Libya. The battle for control of Tripoli's international airport began two weeks ago when Islamist-led militias - mostly from the western city of Misrata - launched a surprise assault on the airport, under control of rival militias from the western mountain town of Zintan. Heavy clashes in the country’s restive east between Libyan soldiers loyal to a renegade general and Islamist-led militias killed dozens of people including civilians, health officials said Sunday. On Saturday, the U.S. evacuated its diplomats in Tripoli to neighboring Tunisia and shut its embassy.

AP Photo/AP video

In this image made from video by The Associated Press, smoke rises from the direction of the Tripoli airport in Tripoli, Libya. Rival militias battled for the control of the international airport, as gunfire and explosions echoed through the city and airlines cancelled some international flights.

AP Photo

A woman votes at a polling center during voting in the parliamentary elections in Tripoli, Libya. Libyans voted to elect a new Parliament, hoping to bring some degree of stability to the North African nation, where for three years since the toppling of longtime dictator Muammar al-Gaddafi there has hardly been any central government and violent militias have run out of control.

AP Photo/Mohammed Ben Khalifa

In this image made from video provided by the Libyan National Army via AP Television, vehicles with heavy artillery of the Tripoli joint security forces move closer to the parliament after troops of Gen. Khalifa Hifter targeted Islamist lawmakers and officials at the parliament in Tripoli, Libya. Forces loyal to a rogue Libyan general attacked the country's parliament, expanding his eastern offensive against Islamists into the heart of the country's capital.

AP/ PTI

Fawaz al-Etan, the Jordanian ambassador in Libya, second row center, poses for a photograph with his family, upon his arrival at the Marka Military Airport, in Amman, Jordan. Al-Etan who was abducted last month at gunpoint in the Libyan capital, Tripoli, returned home after being freed by his captors.

AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon

Libyan's Prime Minister Ali Zeidan, who has been reportedly kidnapped from the capital Tripoli this morning.

File- AP Photo/Abdeljalil Bounhar

A security officer and his sniffer dog at the site where a car bomb that targeted the French embassy went off in Tripoli, Libya.

AP Photo/Abdul Majeed Forjani

Security officers and officials at the site of a car bomb explosion that targeted the French embassy in Tripoli, Libya.

AP Photo/Abdul Majeed Forjani

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton pounds her fist as she testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on the deadly September attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans.

AP Photo/ Pablo Martinez Monsivais

President Mohammed el-Megarif, center, visits the U.S. Consulate to express sympathy for the death of the American ambassador, Chris Stevens and his colleagues in the deadly attack on the Consulate last Tuesday September 11, in Benghazi, Libya. The American ambassador to Libya and three other Americans were killed when a mob of protesters and gunmen overwhelmed the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi. Ambassador Chris Stevens, 52, died as he and a group of embassy employees went to the consulate to try to evacuate staff as a crowd of hundreds attacked the consulate, many of them firing machine-guns and rocket-propelled grenades.

AP photo/ Mohammad Hannon

US ambassador to Libya CHRISTOPHER STEVENS at the Benghazi consulate after Islamist gunmen storm it in protest against a US film which showed the Prophet Mohammed in a bad light.

A SH-60 Sea Hawk helicopter hovers over the guided-missile destroyer USS McFaul in the Arabian Sea May 3, 2012. The US has dispatched two warships loaded with missiles and a Marine team to beef up security at its missions in Libya after the killing of American ambassador in a violent attack on its Consulate in Benghazi.

AP Photo/US Navy, Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Gina K. Wollman

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, accompanied by President Barack Obama, meets with State Department personnel in the courtyard of the State Department in Washington, after the president spoke at the White House concerning the recent deaths of Americans in Libya.

AP Photo/ Alex Brandon

This undated photo released by the U.S. State Department shows U.S. Ambassador to Libya J. Christopher Stevens in an official portrait. Libyan officials say the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans have been killed in an attack on the U.S. consulate in the eastern city of Benghazi by protesters angry over a film that ridiculed Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo/ U.S. State Department

Libyans walk on the grounds of the gutted U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens.

AP Photo/ Ibrahim Alaguri

A man looks at documents at the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens. The graffiti reads, "no God but God," " God is great," and "Muhammad is the Prophet." The American ambassador to Libya and three other Americans were killed when a mob of protesters and gunmen overwhelmed the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, setting fire to it in outrage over a film that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Ambassador Chris Stevens, 52, died as he and a group of embassy employees went to the consulate to try to evacuate staff as a crowd of hundreds attacked the consulate, many of them firing machine-guns and rocket-propelled grenades.

AP Photo/ Ibrahim Alaguri

A burnt car is seen after an attack on the U.S. Consulate by protesters angry over a film that ridiculed Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Benghazi, Libya. The U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other Americans were killed.

AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri

In LIBYA’S first free polls in six decades, war-time PM Mahmoud Jibril’s National Forces Alliance leads over the Islamists. Fight for 80 seats in 200-member assembly, national elections on in 2013.

Libyans hold up their ink-marked fingers that shows they have voted as they celebrate in Martyrs' Square in Tripoli, Libya. Jubilant Libyan voters marked a major step toward democracy after decades of erratic one-man rule, casting their ballots Saturday in the first parliamentary election after last year's overthrow and killing of longtime leader Moammar Gadhafi. But the joy was tempered by boycott calls, the burning of ballots and other violence in the country's restive east.

AP Photo/Abdel Magid Al Fergany

Yuri Kozyrev, of Russia, won first prize in the Spot News Singles category, which shows rebels in Ras Lanuf, Libya.

Yuri Kozyrev / AP

Libya Long live the Nation With the tyrant dead, and the ultimate defeat of forces loyal to him, Mustafa Abdel-Jalil, chairman of Libya’s Transitional National Council, declared the beginning of the changeover to a democratically elected government on October 23. To people in Benghazi (right), the main rebel-held city for months and the nerve-centre of the Libyan revolt, the news would have symbolically meant a new dawn for their nation.

Joao Pina

The protests in Egypt were peaceful, the revolution in Libya wasn’t. Sponsored by Europe, the rebels took up arms and executed Muammar Gaddafi . Billions given by Germany and France notwithstanding, Libya has a tough road of rebuilding ahead.

AP

AP

This image from video broadcast on Al-Arabiya television is said to show Muammar Gaddafi in Sirte, Libya. Libya's information minister said Muammar Gaddafi was killed when revolutionary forces overwhelmed his hometown, Sirte, the last major bastion of resistance two months after the regime fell. Amid the fighting, a NATO airstrike blasted a fleeing convoy that fighters said was carrying Gaddafi.

AFP

U-TURNED The bloody end that Gaddafi came to after his stand at Sirte couldn’t have been more different to the manner of his ascendancy to “Brother leader”.

AFP

Arab Revolts, Squared
SPRING CLOUD Sirte, Colonel Gaddafi’s hometown, held out for long. It fell to nationalist fighters (left) in October. The bells had finally tolled for the Libyan dictator.

PTI

Libyan Transitional National Council chairman Mustafa Abdul-Jalil, left, shakes hands with Italian Premier Mario Monti prior to talks in Rome's Palazzo Chigi government's headquarters.

AP Photo/ Andrew Medichini

In this image taken from video made available, Muammar Gaddafi's son Seif al-Islam examines his injured hand shortly after his capture on Saturday, Nov. 19, 2011, at a safe house in the town of Zintan, Libya. The video shows Seif al-Islam arguing with his captors and admonishing them saying that Libya's regions that were united in revolution will turn against each other in the near future and rip the country apart. Seif al-Islam says his hand was injured during a recent allied bombing.

AP Photo/ APTN

In this image taken from video made available, Muammar Gaddafi's son Seif al-Islam, below right, is surrounded by Libyan revolutionary captors shortly after his capture on Saturday, Nov. 19, 2011, at a safe house in the town of Zintan, Libya. The video shows Seif al-Islam arguing with his captors and admonishing them, saying that Libya's regions that were united in revolution will turn against each other in the near future and rip the country apart.

AP Photo/ APTN

In this image taken from a video, Muammar Gaddafi's son Seif al-Islam, below right, is surrounded by Libyan revolutionary captors shortly after his capture, at a safe house in the town of Zintan, Libya. The video shows Seif al-Islam arguing with his captors and admonishing them, saying that Libya's regions that were united in revolution will turn against each other in the near future and rip the country apart.

AP Photo/APTN

In this Oct. 31, 2011 photo, Libya's new U.S. educated electrical engineer prime minister Abdurrahim el-Keib speaks in Tripoli, Libya. El-Keib, an NTC member from Tripoli with a doctorate from North Carolina State University, said he would appoint the government within two weeks.

AP/PTI

Wounded Libyan man Salem al-Hatiba, flashes victory sign, during his medical treatment in Chamran hospital in Tehran, Iran. Hospital officials said, 76 wounded Libyans arrived, and a group of them are under treatment in Tehran's Chamran Hospital owned by the Iranian Defense Ministry.

AP Photo/ Vahid Salemi

Sandeep Adhwaryu

Ground forces Libyan rebels celebrate the capture of Sirte on October 20, 2011

PTI

Libyan Transitional National Council chairman Mustafa Abdul-Jalil, center, receives a Libyan flag amid Libyan veterans after a press conference in Benghazi, Libya. Libya's transitional leader has ordered an investigation into the death of Muammar Gaddafi after the U.S. and other international powers pressed for the probe.

AP Photo/Francois Mori

Graffiti depicting Muammar Gaddafi reading "The Dictator, You Can't Get Us" is seen on a wall in Benghazi, Libya.

AP Photo/ Francois Mori