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US Sounds Alarm Over 'Democratic Backsliding' As Thousands Protest Georgia's 'Putin-like' Foreign Agent Bill

Protests continue to rock Georgia after around 50,000 people marched against the introduction of the foreign agent bill. The protests in Georgia also come after the United States sounded the alarm for "democratic backsliding" in the European country.

AP
Around 50,000 Georgians protest Kremlin style foreign influence bill Photo: AP
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Protests continue to rock Georgia after around 50,000 people marched against the introduction of the foreign agent bill. The protests in Georgia also come after the United States sounded the alarm for "democratic backsliding" in the eastern European country.

Taking to X, White House National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan stated that the United States was concerned about the introduction of this "Kremlin style" law.

"We are deeply alarmed about democratic backsliding in Georgia. Georgian parliamentarians face a critical choice – whether to support the Georgian people’s Euro-Atlantic aspirations or pass a Kremlin-style foreign agents’ law that runs counter to democratic values. We stand with the Georgian people," stated Sullivan on X.

The White House official added that the citizens of Georgia have made their views know and are demanding the Georgian Dream Party to withdraw the foreign agent bill.

Massive rallies have gripped the transcontinental country since the bill received second approval from the Georgian Parliament. The bill, which is considered similar to Russia's foreign agent bill, has also been considered as a deterrent to Georgia's membership to the European Union.

What Is The Foreign Influence Bill?

The bill - called the Foreign Influence bill - would require all media, non-governmental and non profit organisations o register as "pursuing the interests of a foreign power" if 20 percent of their funding is from a foreign sources.

As per the ruling Georgian Dream party, this bill will work towards "boosting transparency" of foreign funding in the country. However, the Georgian people are against this bill as it threatens free press, dissent and will harm Georgia's membership to the regional bloc.

The final vote for the bill is expected to be held later in May. Georgia's President Salome Zurabishvilli has owed to veto this bill. However, despite the president's veto, the ruling party has enough majority in the parliament to overrule her and ask the speaker of the house to make the final call.

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