Motorsport

British F1 Grand Prix: 'Fed Up' Lando Norris Tired Of Making Excuses After Error

A combination of poor tyre strategy and a slow pit stop proved to be Lando Norris' downfall, as he fell further behind Max Verstappen in the F1 driver's championship

Lando Norris was frustrated following the British Grand Prix.
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Lando Norris said he is "fed up" of making excuses despite claiming a seventh podium finish of the season at the British Grand Prix on Sunday. (More Motorsport News)

Norris started and finished the race in third place as Lewis Hamilton claimed a record-extending ninth win at Silverstone ahead of Max Verstappen in second. 

But a combination of poor tyre strategy and a slow pit stop proved to be Norris' downfall, as he fell further behind Verstappen in the driver's championship. 

Having had the fastest car in recent weeks, the McLaren driver once again failed to make that advantage count and was disappointed with his performance. 

"I'm fed up with just saying I should have done better and I should have done this and I could have done that, or whatever," Norris said. "So I don't care if it takes time.

"I don't want it to take time. I should be doing it now. We should be winning now. I should be making better decisions than what I'm making.

"So, I'm just disappointed. When it's a win in Formula One, I'm not going to settle for something less when we should have achieved it."

Despite his obvious frustration, Norris remained gracious in defeat as he praised Hamilton on his first victory since the Saudi Arabia Grand Prix in 2021. 

Norris admitted the seven-time world champion's know-how on when to pit won the veteran the race and gave him the edge.

"That's just driver feel and driver knowledge of when to box, and Lewis did a better job than me on that side," Norris conceded.

Hamilton's victory saw him become the first driver in history to win in 16 different years in the competition. 

The Brit is now the 12th oldest driver to win in Formula 1 at 39 years and six months old, and set the record for the longest interval between first and last victory, both in terms of time (17 years and 27 days) and Grand Prix's (338) since Canada in 2007.

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