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World's Strangest Festivals: 7 Celebrations You Won't Believe Exist

From throwing tomatoes at each other to chasing a giant cheese down a hill, these festivals showcase the eccentricities that make the world a fascinating place.

Baby Jumping Festival is a unique Spanish celebration.
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Across the globe, diverse cultures express themselves through unique festivities that often leave the world in awe. While some celebrations are rooted in centuries-old traditions, others have sprouted from peculiar or unconventional ideas. In this article, we delve into the world's strangest festivals, showcasing 10 celebrations that will challenge your understanding of cultural expressions.

  • La Tomatina (Spain):

In the small town of Buñol, Spain, every August, thousands gather for the world's largest food fight known as La Tomatina.

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Participants engage in a colossal tomato battle, turning the streets into a sea of red pulp. This chaotic festival is a testament to the Spanish love for vibrant, unconventional celebrations.

  • Cooper's Hill Cheese Rolling (United Kingdom):

In Gloucestershire, England, adrenaline seekers gather each spring to participate in the Cooper's Hill Cheese Rolling Festival. 

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The premise is simple but bizarre – participants chase a wheel of cheese down a steep hill, risking injury for the glory of winning the race and the cheese.

  • El Colacho (Spain):

In the small village of Castrillo de Murcia, Spain, El Colacho takes place during the celebration of Corpus Christi. Participants dressed as the Devil jump over babies lying on mattresses in the street, symbolizing the cleansing of sin. 

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Despite its unconventional nature, locals believe the ritual brings good luck and health to the infants.

  • Monkey Buffet Festival (Thailand):

In the city of Lopburi, Thailand, the annual Monkey Buffet Festival is a feast for both humans and monkeys alike. Locals offer a lavish buffet of fruits, vegetables, and desserts to thousands of macaques that roam the area.

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This festival celebrates the harmonious coexistence between the city's inhabitants and its mischievous primate population.

  • Boryeong Mud Festival (South Korea):

South Korea hosts the Boryeong Mud Festival annually, attracting millions of visitors from around the world. Participants engage in mud wrestling, mudslides, and even a mud marathon.

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This peculiar festival not only promotes the skincare benefits of mud but also provides an unforgettable experience for those willing to get down and dirty.

  • The Night of the Radishes (Mexico):

In Oaxaca, Mexico, the Night of the Radishes is an annual festival where locals carve intricate sculptures from radishes. 

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This tradition began in the early 20th century and has since become a unique celebration that showcases the artistic talents of the community.

  • Songkran Water Festival (Thailand):

Songkran, the Thai New Year, is celebrated with the world's largest water fight.

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Locals and tourists alike take to the streets armed with water guns and buckets, dousing each other in a symbolic cleansing ritual that represents the washing away of sins and bad luck.

These celebrations challenge our preconceptions, showcasing the vibrant and unconventional ways people come together to commemorate their heritage and embrace the extraordinary.

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