Poshan

photos

Dukhtaran-e-Millat

A Kashmiri baker family looks on from the door of their home as supporters of a Kashmiri women separatist group Dukhtaran-e-Milat, or Daughters of the Nation, shout freedom slogans during a protest in Srinagar.

AP Photo/Dar Yasin

Activists and supporters of Kashmiri women's separatist group Dukhtaran-e-Milat, or Daughters of the Nation, shout freedom slogans along with supporters during a protest in Srinagar

AP Photo/Dar Yasin

Asiya Andrabi, second left, chief of Kashmiri women’s separatist group Dukhtaran-e-Milat, or Daughters of the Nation, shout freedom slogans along with supporters during a protest in Srinagar.

AP Photo/Dar Yasin

Asiya Andrabi, third left, chief of Kashmiri women’s separatist group Dukhtaran-e-Milat, or Daughters of the Nation, shout freedom slogans along with supporters during a protest in Srinagar. Authorities imposed an indefinite curfew in parts of Srinagar and key towns on Wednesday as street protests and clashes surged in the region leaving at least 11 dead over the past three weeks in firing blamed on police and paramilitary soldiers. Banner reads "Our struggle will continue till we achieve our right to self determination."

AP Photo/Dar Yasin

Dukhtaran-e-Millat activists leading a procession in protest against the last month's suspicious death of two women, in Srinagar.

PTI Photo/S Irfan

Aasiya Andrabi, center, chief of Dukhtaran-e-Milat (Daughters of Nation), a Muslim women pro-Pakistan organization, speaks to media persons at a hideout in Srinagar. Andrabi condemned U.S. -led air strikes on Afganistan and criticised Pakistan for providing support.

Rafiq Maqbool/ AP

Asiya Andrabi, left, chief of the radical Islamic women group Dukhtaran-e-Milat, addresses the press at an undisclosed location in Srinagar. Asiya appealed to the people of Kashmir to boycott the forthcoming State Assembly elections.

Mukhtar Khan/ AP

SaturdayA veiled Kashmiri Muslim girl stands near a banner during a demonstration held by members of Dukhtaran-e-Millat in Srinagar. The demonstration was held by Kashmiri Muslim women protesters veiled in black scarves to protest against the French government's intention to ban Islamic head scarves in schools.

AP Photo / Mukhtar Khan

Tuesday 30 AugustMembers of Dukhtaran-e-Milat, a Kashmiri women separatist group, come out of a hotel after a raid in Srinagar. Asiya Andrabi, chief of the group, said that they have formed the "Marayam Squad" that will raid brothels and hotels to stop "adultery and immoral practices" in the Kashmir region. The move follows raids by police in Srinagar and other parts of the Kashmir Valley over the past few weeks on suspected brothels, resulting in several arrests. The group has earlier smeared black paint on racy Bollywood film posters portraying revealingly clad women and has also been campaigning for women to veil themselves fully.

AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool

Saturday 17 SeptemberVeiled Kashmiri college girls participate in a protest demonstration demanding the release of Kashmiri separatist leader Aasiya Andrabi in Srinagar. Andrabi, the head of the only female separatist group in Kashmir, Dukhtaran-e-Millat, was arrested on 1st September after raiding hotels and restaurants during a morality campaign to root out snuggling couples and alleged sex workers.

AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool

Friday 9 March
A police officer stands near a burning vehicle in Srinagar after hundreds of protesters led by Dukhtaran-e-Milat activists ransacked a hotel at the Lal Chowk area, claiming it was a being used for prostitution. The Dukhtaran activists were joined by nearly 500 worshippers, who left Friday prayers at a nearby mosque, and stormed the hotel and took out four girls, accused of being prostitutes. Once the girls were brought out, a large group of people gathered around the place and started ransacking the place and set two vehicles ablaze and damaged at least three others. Police swung into action soon after, which resulted in clashes and left atleast three people injured.

AP Photo/Mukhtar Khan

Wednesday 14 February
Supporters of the Dukhtaran-e-Millat, or Daughters of the Community, burn Valentine's Day cards during a protest in Srinagar. Kashmir's separatist women's group joined Hindu hardliners in other parts of the country to protest against Valentine's Day celebrations. Veiled Muslim women activists of the organisation along with men raided hotels and restaurants in Srinagar and burnt Valentine's Day cards to protest against what they said was blasphemous celebration and against the Islamic culture. Students Federation of India- the students wing of the CPI (M) also joined the anti- Valentine's Day protets this year saying "unsocial elements" will not be allowed to "distort" Indian values.

AP Photo/ Mukhtar Khan

Supporters of the Dukhtaran-e-Millat, or Daughters of the Community, burn Valentine's Day cards during a protest in Srinagar. Kashmir's separatist women's group joined Hindu hardliners to protest against Valentine's Day celebrations. Veiled Muslim women activists of the organisation along with men raided hotels and restaurants in Srinagar and burnt Valentine's Day cards to protest against what they said was blasphemous celebration and against the Islamic culture.

AP Photo/ Mukhtar Khan

Wednesday 17 January
Tear gas shells explode near supporters of the hardline faction of the All Parties Hurriyat Conference (APHC) during a protest in Srinagar. Life in Kashmir Valley was crippled by a near total shutdown following the protest call given by Syed Ali Shah Geelani, chairman of the breakaway hardline group of the APHC, against moderate Hurriyat leader Mirwaiz Moulvi Umer Farooq's visit to Pakistan. Shops, business establishments and public transport remained closed in Srinagar as well as in all other major towns of the Valley during the shutdown that had been supported by the frontline militant group Hizbul Mujahideen, women's separatist group Dukhtaran-e-Milat and some other separatist organisations. Meanwhile, Mirwaiz Umer Farooq has called for an end to armed struggle to resolve the Kashmir issue as it has only created "more graveyards" and has said he would convene an all-party meet in Pakistan-occupied Kashmir (POK) in next few days to adopt a joint strategy for resolution of Kashmir issue.

AP Photo/Dar Yasin

Tear gas shells explode near supporters of the hardline faction of the All Parties Hurriyat Conference (APHC) during a protest in Srinagar. Life in the Kashmir Valley was crippled by a near total shutdown following the protest call given by Syed Ali Shah Geelani, chairman of the breakaway hardline group of the APHC, against moderate Hurriyat leader Mirwaiz Moulvi Umer Farooq's visit to Pakistan. The three-member team, headed by the Mirwaiz, began their Islamabad visit to meet the Pakistan leadership on Wednesday. Shops, business establishments and public transport remained closed in Srinagar as well as in all other major towns of the Valley during the shutdown that had been supported by the frontline militant group Hizbul Mujahideen, women's separatist group Dukhtaran-e-Milat and some other separatist organisations.

AP Photo/Dar Yasin

Friday 23 June
Activists of the women's separatist group Dukhtaran-e-Millat, or Daughters of the Community, block a road in Srinagar as they shout slogans during a demonstration against the sex scandal in J&K involving senior bureaucrats, police officials and politicians. Cracking its whip on the political establishment in Jammu and Kashmir, the CBI has arrested two former ministers which includes a Congress MLA Ghulam Ahmed Mir in connection with their alleged involvement in the sex scandal. The CBI arrested Mir, a Congress MLA from Dooru Anantnag, from J&K House in Chankyapuri in New Delhi while another independent MLA Raman Mattoo was arrested in Srinagar. The agency has also filed chargesheet in the court of Chief Judicial Magistrate against nine accused, including BSF Deputy Inspector General S K Padhi, former Additional Advocate General Anil Sethi, Deputy SP Mohammad Ashraf Mir and Sabeena, the alleged kingpin of the sex racket. The accused are charged under various sections of the Ranbir Penal Code including 376 for rape of the 15-year-old victim. As Chief Minister Ghulam Nabi Azad's remarked that "the sexual exploitation of girls in Kashmir are similar to sex scandals in Delhi and Mumbai" and "the arrest of the Congress MLA would have no bearing on his government", his deputy Muzaffar Hussain Beg has accused the organisations spearheading the protests against the sex scandal, particularly the Dukhtaran, of "defaming Kashmir and undermining the political stability in the state" and saying "there was a plan to undermine the political credibility of the parties like Congress, National Conference and the PDP and their leadership."

AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool

Friday 5 May
A Kashmiri youth throws utensils belonging to a woman, suspected of running a prostitution ring, into a bonfire in Srinagar. An angry mob attacked two houses of Sabeena, the alleged kingpin of a sex racket and clashed with the police as the Kashmir Valley observed a total shutdown to protest the failure of the authorities to act against those involved in the scandal. On April 28, the J&K Police had arrested two persons after finding CDs in which a 15-year old girl had been forcibly filmed nude. The girl and another minor later claimed at least 43 young girls were blackmailed and forced into prostitution and named two former ministers, some senior police officers, bureaucrats and businessmen for their involvement in the sex scandal. Though the state government has already transferred the investigations to the CBI and the J&K High Court has initiated proceedings into the matter, angry protests rocked the state capital throughout the week with university and school students joining the protests. Cashing in on the controversy, women’s organisation Dukhtaran-e-Millat has launched a fresh moral policing campaign while a little-known militant outfit, Al-Madina Regiment, has served a 10-day notice to cable TV operators to shut down. Pakistan-based militant group Harkat-ul-Mujahideen had set a seven-day deadline last week for hotels and restaurants to dismantle cabins meant for couples.

AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool

Tuesday 14 February
A member of the Hindu Jagrana Vedike shouts slogans and burns a poster at a protest against Valentine's Day celebrations in Bangalore. Hardline Hindu groups held loud protests against Valentine's Day celebrations across India saying it was a foreign festival that has corrupted traditional values. While Shiv Sena activists in Varanasi took to the streets along with priests to conduct marriages of whosoever seen indulging in indecent activities, in Nagpur police arrested rowdy activists of the Vishwa Hindu Parishad and Bajrang Dal who whisked away couples from parks. In Srinagar, about two dozen members of Dukhtaran-e-Milat went on rampage at the gift shops and burnt Valentine’s Day cards to protest against what they claim is "irreligious celebrations" in the wake of the cartoon row. Later, marking a first, perhaps because of the recent reverses his party has suffered, a much mellowed Bal Thackeray offered an unqualified apology to all women who had been harassed and humiliated by the Shiv Sainiks.

AP Photo/Gautam Singh

Advertisement