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Former Delhi LG Baijal Expresses Worry Over Water Pollution

Former Delhi Lieutenant Governor Anil Baijal on Tuesday expressed concern over the rising levels of pollution, including that of water, in Delhi and pitched for the reuse of water for non-potable purposes.

Air and water pollution
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Former Delhi Lieutenant Governor Anil Baijal on Tuesday expressed concern over the rising levels of pollution, including that of water, in Delhi and pitched for the reuse of water for non-potable purposes.

"The water level is going down. We have not taken any effort to ensure that we can at least recycle water.

"There would be a major scarcity of water. Nobody will give us (Delhi) water. We should at least ensure water reusability," Baijal said at an event here.

He also said electronic waste "would be terrible for human beings".

The former Delhi L-G was speaking at an event for the launch of a book called 'The Garden of Pride: Project Vasant Udyaan'. During the event, a film titled 'A Seed that took Root: Vasant Udyaan' was screened.

There was also a panel discussion on the role of citizen engagement and WASH services in restoring the ecosystem.

Talking about Project Udyyan, Partho Mukhopadhyay of the Centre for Policy Research deemed the resurrection of an abandoned sewage pumping station as the most wonderful aspect of the project.

"The fact that government agencies trusted the communities, and that DDA was able to transfer resources to other government agencies to manage the funds, was an innovative and creative design," Mukhopadhyay said.

Sujoy Majumdar, WASH Specialist, at UNICEF, said, " We need to understand what creates an enabling environment to make such partnerships between communities, government, and private players a reality".

Avinash Kumar, the Director of Citizen Action for Water Sustainability, concluded the discussion by saying, "It is clear that issues like water sustainability, sanitation, health, heritage conservation, governance, and community development cannot be viewed in isolation and must be addressed in their entirety through citizen participation."

The book encapsulates the journey of a citizens' movement where a group of residents representing their Residents' Welfare Associations transformed the area into a landscaped park that recalls a Tughlaq-era garden using treated sewage water. 

(Inputs from PTI)

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