International

Baltimore Bridge Collapse: Bodies Of 2 Workers Recovered From Pickup Truck

A ship rammed into the Francis Scott Key Bridge of Baltimore early Tuesday, causing it to collapse in a matter of seconds and creating a terrifying scene as several vehicles plunged into the chilly river below.

Matt Rourke
A container ship rests against wreckage of the Francis Scott Key Bridge on Wednesday, March 27, 2024, in Baltimore. Photo: Matt Rourke
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Bodies of two people have been recovered from the site of the Francis Scott Key Bridge in United States' Baltimore that collapsed into a river early Tuesday when a ship crashed into it, police said. The two bodies recovered of the six construction workers who were missing and presumed dead after the bridge collapsed.

Col Roland L Butler Jr, superintendent for Maryland State Police, said on Wednesday that bodies of a 35-year-old and a 26-year-old were recovered from a red pickup truck in the Patapsco River near the mid-span of the collapsed Francis Scott Key Bridge.

All six construction workers were from Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, Butler said.

A ship manned by a 22-member Indian crew rammed into the major bridge early Tuesday, causing it to collapse in a matter of seconds and creating a terrifying scene as several vehicles plunged into the chilly river below.

Ship's Black Box Recovered

A team of US investigators boarded the container ship, a Singapore-flagged Dali, that collided with the bridge and recovered its black box or data recorded, a top official said on Wednesday.

One of the 22 Indian crew members received minor injuries and was treated and discharged from the hospital, officials said.

National Transportation Safety Board Chair Jennifer Homendy told CNN that investigators were able to board the Dali ship overnight.

"Some investigators boarded late last night to look at the engine room, the bridge and gather any sort of electronics or documentation," news agency Associated Press quoted National Transportation Safety Board Chair Jennifer Homendy as saying.

“We’ve sent that back to our lab to evaluate and begin to develop a timeline of events that led up to the strike on the bridge,” she added.

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