Wednesday, May 25, 2022
Outlook.com

Kritika Kamra Believes More Women Than Men On A Film Set Is Good Progress

The actor claims that, despite a lack of female-driven series, the situation is improving; and also claims to have had no issues with auditioning in the past 15 years.

Kritika Kamra Believes More Women Than Men On A Film Set Is Good Progress
Kritika Kamra on women in Bollywood. Instagram/@kkamra

Actress Kritika Kamra, who made her acting debut in 2007 with the television serial 'Yahaan Ke Hum Sikander,' believes that one of the most significant improvements in the entertainment business has been the increased representation of women.

According to the Hindustan Times, Kamra, who has worked with producer Ekta Kapoor on her upcoming project and is helmed by director Tanuja Chandra, remarked, “There’s a dearth of shows made by women, even in the West. It’s skewed but it’s getting better. We know so many women filmmakers today. In fact, there are more women than men on a set." 

When asked if she is aware of a difference in how female filmmakers approach their subjects, the actress said, “I don’t think understanding sensibilities is based on gender. There are some stories that are required to be told from the lens of a woman. If there’s a story about a certain gender or community and we’ve someone who has lived through that experience, that’s always a plus,” elaborates Kamra, who was recently seen in web series Kaun Banegi Shikharwati.

The Tandav actress has no "complaints" about auditioning if that's what it takes to exhibit her abilities for a particular job, having proven her mettle across mediums like TV, cinema, and now the web. It's an intriguing method for her to break through prejudices about TV performers. She's open about it, and says “I’m happy to go out there and prove that not all TV actors have one particular style. I’m very happy to audition. I get calls from directors and casting directors who already know who I’m and about the work I do. But if they want to try me for a part, it’s great. Unless I audition, I wouldn’t know if I’ll be good enough.”

The 33-year-old adds, “Auditions are a nice and clean process of you trying your best to understand what makers are looking for in you. And even if I don’t get the part, it feels fair to me.”

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