Art & Entertainment

Children’s Day Special: Karan Veer Mehra - Sonali Kulkarni Look Back At The Time When They Discovered Their Passion For Acting

Zee Theatre stars Karan Veer Mehra and Sonali Kulkarni share the memories of their first stage performance on this Children's Day. The entire national is celebration the occasion today.

Karan Veer Mehra, Sonali Kulkarni
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Childhood is the time when the seeds of the future are planted and on Children's Day, two Zee Theater stars look back and recall the moments that shaped them into the artists they have grown to become today.

Karan Veer Mehra, who stars in Zee Theater's teleplay, 'Lights Out' and Sonali Kulkarni who headlines 'White Lilly & Night Rider' speak up about when the spark of becoming an actor was lit inside them. They also shared photographs from their first-ever dramatic performances.

Overcome by nostalgia, Mehra says, "I think I was 4 or 5 years old, when I wore Amitabh Bachchan's 'Shahenshah' costume on my birthday and that I think was when the acting bug bit me."

Mehra also believes in keeping his inner child alive by staying connected to sports like football, cricket and badminton but misses spending time with his childhood friends when mornings would turn into evenings and time would just fly magically. He says, "That carefree manner in which we experienced life has just been taken over by technology. My nephew, who is not even three years old, already knows how to use the phone and switch on the TV. We must consciously encourage children to explore the world the way they are supposed to and limit their exposure to too much screen time."

Sonali Kulkarni recalls her childhood and says, "When I look back, what immediately comes to mind is the memory of my two elder brothers, mom, dad and my ajji at the dining table, enjoying delicious food, listening and laughing as I narrate something. And there is another memory of all my relatives, coming together during festivals and all of us performing something. I guess that is how I discovered at some level that I wanted to be a performer."

Kulkarni says she tries to keep her inner child alive by being uncomplicated and appreciative and says, "I compliment people generously and I like being happy with the open-hearted innocence of a young girl. I am happy that I'm getting work, that there's food in my house, that I have a house, and a lovely family. Happiness comes naturally to children, they are happy for no reason and have a sense of assurance that they have all that they need and deserve the gifts coming their way. I want to protect that quality within me."

At a time, when organic connections have been replaced by virtual ones, Kulkarni misses family get-togethers that defined her childhood. She says, “Things have become too formal now, and we have to inform each other before dropping in. Children too have become deeply dependent on electronic devices as the opportunities to meet and connect shrink. Just venturing out even for a movie in a city is cumbersome and most families prefer to stay at home so yes, digital connections are increasing while human connections are diminishing. I think all of us need to bring back the art of leisurely conversations and rediscover the joy of sharing our lives with real people rather than with gadgets."

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