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Attorney General William Barr accompanied by former FBI director and the CIA director William Webster, and his wife Lynda Webster speaks during a news conference to address elder financial exploitation and law enforcement actions, at Department of Justice in Washington.

AP/PTI

Former CIA Director John Brennan is sworn-in on Capitol Hill in Washington, prior to testifying before the House Intelligence Committee Russia Investigation Task Force.

AP/ PTI

Vice President Mike Pence, left, watches as newly sworn in CIA Director Mike Pompeo, second from left, signs the affidavit of appointment in the Vice President's Ceremonial Office in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in the White House complex, in Washington. Also seen Pompeo's wife Susan, second from right, and son Nick.

AP/PTI

A cement bust of America's most-wanted whistleblower Edward Snowden, once famously confiscated by police, returned to public display in New York to kick off a street art festival.

Courtesy: Twitter

President George W Bush was fully aware of and an "integral part" of the CIA's torture of terror suspects, his vice-president Dick Cheney has said. Speaking to Fox News, Cheney denied Bush was kept out of the loop. He said the then-president "was in fact an integral part of the program and he had to approve it."

AP/ Manuel Balce Ceneta

Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. is pursued by reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington as she arrives to release a report on the CIA's harsh interrogation techniques at secret overseas facilities after the 9/11 terror attacks.

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

In this image provided by Human Rights Watch, NSA leaker Edward Snowden, center, attends a news conference at Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport with Sarah Harrison of WikiLeaks. Snowden seeks asylum in Russia, according to a Parliament member who was among about a dozen activists and officials to meet with him in the Moscow airport where he's been marooned for weeks. Duma member Vyacheslav Nikonov told reporters of Snowden's intentions after the meeting behind closed doors in the transit zone of Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport.

Human Rights Watch, Tanya Lokshina/ AP Photo

Activists of Ukraine's Internet party, one of them acting as a CIA agent making telephone taps, demand the American authorities stop the pursuit of National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden at an action of protest near the US Embassy in Kiev, Ukraine.

AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky

CIA chief and ex-commander in Afghanistan, Iraq, GEN DAVID PETRAEUS, after affair with his biographer. US Afghan commander Gen John Allen also hit by the scandal.

Paula Broadwell holds a drink in the kitchen of her brother's house in Washington. Broadwell is CIA Director David Petraeus' biographer, with whom he had an affair that led to his abrupt resignation last Friday. It was Broadwell's threatening emails to Jill Kelley, a Florida woman who is a Petraeus family friend, that led to the FBI's discovery of communications between Broadwell and Petraeus indicating they were having an affair.

AP Photo/Cliff Owen

FBI agents carry boxes and a computer from the home of Paula Broadwell, the woman whose affair with retired Gen. David Petraeus led to his resignation as CIA director, in the Dilworth neighborhood of Charlotte, N.C.

AP Photo/Chuck Burton

This July 13, 2011, photo made available on the International Security Assistance Force's Flickr website shows the former Commander of International Security Assistance Force and U.S. Forces-Afghanistan Gen. Davis Petraeus, left, shaking hands with Paula Broadwell, co-author of "All In: The Education of General David Petraeus."As details emerge about Petraeus' extramarital affair with his biographer, Broadwell, including a second woman who allegedly received threatening emails from the author, members of Congress say they want to know exactly when the now ex-CIA director and retired general popped up in the FBI inquiry, whether national security was compromised and why they weren't told sooner

AP Photo/ ISAF

The CIA’s $20,000-a-year man? Kanti Desai

CIA Director Leon Panetta, right, leaves after briefing members of Congress on Capitol Hill Tuesday, May 3, 2011 in Washington.

AP/PTI

This undated aerial handout image provided by the CIA shows the Abbottabad compound in Pakistan where American forces in Pakistan killed Osama bin Laden.

AP Photo/CIA

Pakistani police officer block protesters from reaching the U. S. embassy during a protest to condemn American CIA contractor Raymond Allen Davis, in Islamabad, Pakistan. Davis was held on charges relating to the shooting deaths of two Pakistani men, but was released from prison and left Pakistan after more than $2 million in "blood money" is thought to have been paid to his victims' families and the families pardoned him in accordance with Pakistani law.

AP Photo/ B.K.Bangash

Pakistani students rally to condemn the release of an American CIA contractor Raymond Allen Davis, in Peshawar, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Mohammad Sajjad

Pakistani students burn a representation of a U. S. flag during a protest rally to condemn the release of an American CIA contractor Raymond Allen Davis, in Peshawar, Pakistan. Davis was being held on charges relating to the shooting deaths of two Pakistani men, but was released from prison and left Pakistan after more than $2 million in "blood money" is thought to have been paid to his victims' families and the families pardoned him in accordance with Pakistani law.

AP Photo/ Mohammad Sajjad

Supporters of the Pakistani religious party Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam rally against American embassy worker Raymond Davis who shot dead two Pakistanis, in the Pakistani border town of Chaman along the Afghanistan border. The U.S. says Davis, was acting in self-defense against robbers and qualifies for diplomatic immunity. But Pakistani authorities have refused to release Davis since the Jan. 27 shooting. Banner and placard in native language read "Raymond Davis should be hanged publicly".

AP/PTI

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