United States

Baggage Handler's Tip: Why You Should Rethink Ribbons On Your Suitcase

A baggage handler at Dublin Airport has raised concerns about travellers attaching ribbons to their suitcases. While these ribbons may help identify luggage, they can cause issues with the scanning process in the baggage hall, potentially leading to delays or missed flights. 

Pexels
Representative image Photo: Pexels
info_icon

For frequent flyers, the hassle of delayed baggage arrival is a common concern. Many avid travellers prefer to forgo checked bags altogether, fearing the inconvenience of picking them out from a sea of look-alike luggage or the anxiety of their bags failing to reach their intended destination.

However, for those who cannot avoid checking bags, a simple solution has long been employed: attaching a personal marker to their suitcase for easier identification upon arrival.

While this age-old luggage hack aims to streamline the baggage pick-up process, recent revelations suggest it may actually contribute to delays in retrieving luggage from the carousel. According to Dublin Airport baggage handler John, attachments such as colourful ribbons or distinctive luggage tags, though helpful for travellers in spotting their bags, can impede the scanning process in the baggage hall.

"Ribbons that people tie onto their suitcases to help identify them can cause issues with the bag being scanned," John informed RSVP Live. He explained that when bags cannot be scanned automatically due to attached accessories, they are often subjected to manual processing, potentially leading to delays or even missed flights for passengers.

To avoid such setbacks, John advises travellers to send their suitcases off without any additional identifiers, including ribbons or old travel stickers. "Take old stickers off the bag; it can cause confusion with the scanning process," he suggested.

Furthermore, certain unexpected items packed inside luggage can also trigger alarm bells at airport security checkpoints. John cautioned against packing Marzipan, a type of almond candy dough, as its density resembles that of some explosives, leading to mandatory bag removal and thorough searches.

In addition to mindful packing, John offered a simple yet effective tip to prevent baggage damage: positioning suitcases with wheels up before drop-off. While airlines are responsible for repairing or compensating passengers for damaged baggage, waiting for resolution can significantly disrupt travel plans.

By adhering to these preventative measures, travellers can mitigate the stress and inconvenience associated with baggage delays, ensuring a smoother journey from check-in to touchdown. John's insights from Dublin Airport shed light on common pitfalls and offer practical solutions to alleviate travel woes for passengers worldwide.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement