Art & Entertainment

‘Prey’ On Disney+ Hotstar Movie Review: Amber Midthunder’s Survival Thriller Is A Befitting Addition To The Predator Saga

After a theatrical release, ‘Prey’ has finally been released on Disney+ Hotstar. Is the movie starring Amber Midthunder in the lead, worth your time? Or can you simply skip it? Read the full movie review to find out.

A Still From 'Prey'
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‘Prey’: Cast & Crew

Director: Dan Trachtenberg

Cast: Amber Midthunder, Dakota Beavers, Dane DiLiegro, Michelle Thrush, Stormee Kipp, Julian Black Antelope, Bennett Taylor

Available On: Disney+ Hotstar

Duration: 1 Hour 39 Minutes

‘Prey’: Story

Set in the 1700s, a young Comanche girl (Amber Midthunder)wants to be a warrior like her brother and the other men in the tribe. A feminist at heart, she has trained herself in warfare so as to be as good as any other warriors in the tribe. Sadly, she is still not taken seriously on the basis of her sex. However, when an alien predator descends on the planet and starts killing everyone in his path, the young girl takes it upon herself to kill this predator and prove to her tribe that she is an equally worthy warrior. This predator is a highly evolved alien that hunts humans for sport. Will the girl be able to fight against the wilderness, dangerous colonisers and this mysterious creature to keep her people safe? Will she be able to prove herself worthy of being called a warrior? Well, you’ll have to watch the movie to find out.

‘Prey’: Performances

Amber Midthunder carries the film on her shoulders. She is the one who takes away the lion’s share of the screen space, and rightfully so, she delivers at every juncture. Whether it’s the combat sequences or the chase sequences, she has managed to get into the skin of the character perfectly. She manages to showcase an array of emotions that young teenage girls back in the 1700s may have been dealing with. Her subtle stance on feminism is sure to make you want to watch her in further predator films.

‘Prey’: Direction, Script & Technical Aspects

Dan Trachtenberg’s direction is the classiest thing about ‘Prey’. He has managed to film some of the scenes in wildness so perfectly that it would pass a chill down your spine. There is an entire bear chase sequence, which is so aptly executed that you’ll be just simply on the edge of your seats. You’re jumping from one action sequence to the other and you’ll not get tired. While the entire animal chases have been captured through VFX, you’ll not find a single shot where it doesn’t look real.

The story by Patrick Aison and Dan Trachtenberg along with the screenplay by Patrick Aison makes sure that you’re always on the hooks. They’ve managed to show the predator in a much more deadly manner. The characteristics they have shown in this predator, show that it is pretty much invincible. That’s what makes the task of killing the predator even more challenging for the lead actress. To add to this the subtlety of feminism shown throughout is brilliant.

Jeff Cutter’s cinematography is the best part of this movie. The way he has not only recreated the feel of the 1700s in the locales, but he has also managed to ensure that the animals and birds are shown in ‘Prey’ also have a feel of that era. The tinge of sepia filter used in some of the scenes is a masterstroke.

Angela M. Catanzaro and Claudia Castello's editing is crisp and keeps the story to the point. There is not an instance where you feel that the story is dragging. They’ve managed to keep the runtime well below 2 hours, which is fantastic for such a survival thriller.

Sarah Schachner’s music is the only weak point of the film. The background score is patchy at best. It doesn’t transport the viewer into the story.

‘Prey’: Can Kids Watch it?

Yes

Outlook’s Verdict

‘Prey’ is a worthy addition to the predator sagas. It definitely has the chills running down your spine at the opportune moments and keeps the thrill intact till the very end. It’s indeed a Must Watch. I am going with 4 stars.

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