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President Donald Trump meets with Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan at the Inter Continental Barclay hotel during the United Nations General Assembly in New York.

Photograph by AP/PTI

Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan, right, meets with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., on Capitol Hill in Washington.

AP/PTI

Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan speaks during a meeting with US President Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House, in Washington.

AP/PTI Photo

US President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan in the Oval Office of the White House, in Washington.

AP/PTI Photo

Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan speaks during a meeting with President Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House, in Washington.

AP/PTI Photo

US President Donald Trump gestures as he greets Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan as he arrives at the White House, in Washington.

AP/PTI

In this photo released by Press Information Department, Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan, left, meets visiting U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, front, in Islamabad, Pakistan. Khan met with Pompeo, saying he was "optimistic" he could reset the relationship with Washington after the U.S. suspended aid over the country's alleged failure to combat militants.

AP/PTI

In this photo released by Press Information Department, visiting U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, left, shakes hand with Pakistan's foreign minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi, prior to their meeting in Islamabad, Pakistan. Pompeo arrived in Pakistan at a time when relations between the two countries have sunk to a new low.

AP/PTI

Raymond Davis in Pakistani custody in 2011

Photograph by AP

Gen Ayub Khan gives US president Lyndon Johnson a fond ‘Pathan style slap’ on a visit stateside

John Kerry gets a slice of home for breakfast at a Dunkin Donuts outlet in Pakistan.

Courtesy - John Kerry on Twitter

Pakistani Prime Minister's adviser on foreign affairs Sartaj Aziz, right, shakes hand with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, as U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan Richard Olson, center, watches him after their joint press conference in Islamabad, Pakistan. Kerry praised the Pakistani military's operation against militants in the country's northwest, saying the results are "significant."

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

File: Veteran American diplomat Robin Raphel, known for her strong pro-Pakistan leanings, has been placed under federal counter intelligence investigation.

File AP Photo/ Dennis Cook

U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, left, meets with Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif of Pakistan during the 69th session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters

AP Photo/Jason DeCrow

Pakistan's cricketer-turned politician Imran Khan, leader of Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf marches towards the Parliament with his supporters to protest against U.S. drone attacks in Pakistani tribal areas targeting militant hideouts, in Islamabad, Pakistan. Khan said that his party will not allow NATO supplies to bordering Afghanistan until drone attacks will not be stopped.

AP Photo/ B.K. Bangash

Supporter of the Pakistani religious party Jamaat-u-Dawa burn a representation of a U.S. flag during a rally to condemn U.S. drone attacks in Pakistan, in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Shakil Adil

A Pakistani boy holds a banner standing next to Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawwa and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba militant group, while heading a protest to condemn U.S. drone attacks in Pakistan, in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ K.M. Chaudary

Obama met with Pakistan Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais/ AP Photo

Secretary of State John Kerry breaks the Ramadan fast as he shares an Iftar meal with alumni at the Fatimah Jinnah Women's University in Rawalpindi Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Jason Reed, Pool

Pakistan's ex-cricket star-turned-politician Imran Khan, center, addresses his supporters during a peace march in Tank, Pakistan. The Pakistani military blocked a convoy carrying thousands of Pakistanis and a small contingent of U.S. anti-war activists protesting American drone strikes from entering a lawless tribal region along the border with Afghanistan

AP/PTI

Pakistan's ex-cricket star-turned-politician Imran Khan, top left, addresses supporters during a peace march in Mianwali, Pakistan. Thousands of Pakistanis joined by a group of U.S. anti-war activists headed toward Pakistan's militant-riddled tribal belt to protest U.S. drone strikes - even as a Pakistani Taliban faction warned that suicide bombers would stop the demonstration.

AP Photo/Jabbar Ahmed

American citizens rally in Islamabad, Pakistan against drone attacks in Pakistani tribal belt. A group of American anti-war activists are in Pakistan with plans to join a “march” into the country’s tribal belt to protest U.S. drone strikes in the rugged northwest territory. Their presence has energized some Pakistanis, but it also has added to concerns that Islamist militants will target the weekend event.

AP Photo/B.K. Bangash

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Pakistani Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar prior to a meeting in Washington.

PTI Photo

Oil tankers, which were used to transport NATO fuel supplies to Afghanistan, are parked Karachi, Pakistan. Trucks carrying NATO troop supplies are set to resume shipments to Afghanistan following a deal between the U.S. and Pakistan that ended Islamabad's seven-month blockade.

AP Photo/ Fareed Khan

A Pakistani mechanic works on an oil tanker, which was used to transport NATO fuel supplies to Afghanistan, while parked with other tankers in Karachi, Pakistan. The Obama administration said that Pakistan was reopening its supply lines into Afghanistan, after the U.S. belatedly issued an apology for the November killing of 24 Pakistani troops in a NATO airstrike.

AP Photo/Shakil Adil

Supporters of Pakistan Defense Council, a coalition of Islamic parties, burn a representation of a US flag at rally to condemn the reopening of the NATO supply line to neighboring Afghanistan, in Quetta, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Arshad Butt

DR SHAKIL AFRIDI, the Pak surgeon who trailed Al Qaeda boss Osama bin Laden for the CIA, gets 33 years in jail for ‘high treason’ under the Khyber’s tribal justice system. US protests.

Hafiz Saeed, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawa and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, center, surrounded by guards, attends with his supporters a rally against a possible resumption of NATO supplies to neighboring Afghanistan, in Lahore, Pakistan. Pakistan's parliament has unanimously approved new guidelines for the country in its troubled relationship with the United States, a decision that could pave the way for the reopening of supply lines to NATO troops in neighboring Afghanistan.

AP/PTI

Oil tankers, which were used to transport NATO fuel supplies to Afghanistan, are parked in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Fareed Khan

Pakistani protesters burn representation of American flag during a rally to condemn to the reopening of the NATO supply line to neighboring Afghanistan, in Multan, Pakistan. Pakistan's president announced that he will attend the upcoming NATO summit in Chicago, accepting an invitation that was given after the country indicated it plans to end its six-month blockade of supplies meant for coalition troops in Afghanistan.

AP Photo / Khalid Tanveer

A man takes nap on one of oil tankers used to transport NATO fuel supplies to neighboring Afghanistan, in Karachi, Pakistan. Pakistan's president announced that he will attend the upcoming NATO summit in Chicago, accepting an invitation that was given after the country indicated it plans to end its six-month blockade of supplies meant for coalition troops in Afghanistan.

AP Photo/ Fareed Khan

A Pakistani Shiite Muslim protester falls over a fire, while pouring gasoline on representations of US and Israeli flags, during an anti-Israel rally and in solidarity with the Palestinian people in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Fareed Khan

Supporters of Pakistan's religious party Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam hold a a poster of al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden during pro-bin Laden rally in Quetta, Pakistan. Hundreds of Osama supporters from a pro-Taliban Islamic party have rallied to condemn the killing of bin Laden by US forces a year ago.

AP Photo/ Arshad Butt

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, center, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawwa and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba arrives to an anti U.S. and anti India rally organised by Pakistan Defense Council in Peshawar, Pakistan. The United States has offered a $10 million bounty for Hafiz who allegedly orchestrated the 2008 Mumbai attacks and has been directing an anti-American political movement in recent months.

AP Photo/ Mohammad Sajjad

Protests against the bounty for Saeed

AP

Visiting U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Thomas Nides, second left, shakes hand with Pakistani Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar, third right, prior to their meeting in Islamabad, Pakistan. U.S. diplomatic efforts to persuade Pakistan to reopen NATO supply lines to the Afghan war are proving no match for rampant anti-Americanism here, with Pakistani lawmakers increasingly unwilling to support a decision that risks them branded as friends of Washington.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawah and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba talks in Islamabad, Pakistan. The US has offered a $10 million bounty for a Pakistani militant leader who allegedly orchestrated the 2008 Mumbai attacks and has been directing an anti-American political movement in recent months.

AP Photo/ B.K. Bangash

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawah and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba in Islamabad, Pakistan. The United States has offered a $10 million bounty for a Pakistani militant leader who allegedly orchestrated the 2008 Mumbai attacks and has been directing an anti-American political movement in recent months.

AP Photo/ B.K. Bangash

People walk past the secretariat of Jamaat-ud-Dawah headed by Hafiz Mohammad Saeed in Lahore, Pakistan. The US has offered a $10 million bounty for Saeed, a decision welcomed by India, which hoped that this would prod Islamabad into taking action against the mastermind of 26/11 Mumbai terror attack that killed 166 people. Banner on the wall reads " How India, the killer of hundreds of thousands Muslims, could be a favorite nation.

AP Photo/ K.M.Chaudary

File photo of Pakistan-based Jamaat-ud-Dawa chief Hafiz Saeed, the mastermind of the 26/11 Mumbai attacks. The US has announced a USD 10 million bounty on Hafiz Saeed, a move welcomed by India, which said it sends a strong signal to LeT and its "patrons" that the international community remains united in combating terrorism.

Activists of Pakistan's banned religious group Hizb-ut-Tahrir hold an anti U.S rally in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo

Pakistani Prime Minister Syed Yusuf Raza Gilani, left, and U.S. President Barack Obama smile during their bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the Nuclear Security Summit in Seoul, South Korea.

AP Photo/ Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Pakistan's Interior Minister Rehman Malik, center, leaves after attending parliament's joint session in Islamabad, Pakistan. A parliamentary commission demanded an end to American drone attacks inside Pakistan and an apology for deadly U.S. airstrikes in November, as part of proposed new terms in the country's troubled relations with the United States.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

Pakistani protesters burn representation of U.S. flag at a rally to condemn drone attacks on militants allegedly hiding in Pakistan tribal areas, in Multan, Pakistan. An American drone strike killed four Islamist militants in Pakistan, the first such attack since errant U.S. airstrikes in November killed two dozen Pakistan troops and pushed strained ties between the two nations close to collapse.

AP Photo/ Khalid Tanveer

Pakistan Sealed with a bolt Lightning strikes over the hills beyond the compound in Abbotabad, Pakistan, where US Navy SEALS took out Osama bin Laden in a pre-dawn swoop in their Chinook and Blackhawk helicopters on May 2. The fugitive Al Qaeda chief was later given a sea-burial.

Warrick Page

Pakistan's former ambassador to U.S., Husain Haqqani, center, is surrounded by security officers as he leaves Supreme Court in Islamabad, Pakistan. Pakistan's prime minister claimed there was a conspiracy to oust the country's civilian government, a sign of growing tension with the army over a secret memo sent to Washington earlier this year asking the for help in averting a supposed military coup.

AP Photo/Anjum Naveed

Supporters of a religious group Jamiat Ulma-e-Islam chant slogan behind a banner, reading ' get all the bases vacated from the American and NATO scoundrels', during an anti NATO rally in Peshawar, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad

This picture taken on April 8, 2008 shows Pakistan's Ambassador in Washington Hussein Haqqani during a news conference in Islamabad, Pakistan. Pakistan's envoy to the United States says he has resigned over claims he wrote a memo to Washington asking for its help in reining in the country's powerful military.

AP/PTI

Farah Naz Asfhani, spokesperson of President Asif Zaradari and wife of the Pakistani ambassador in Washington Husain Haqqani, talks to reporters in Islamabad, Pakistan. Asfhani announced that she will file defamation charges against Mansoor Ijaz and called the secret Memo to Admiral Mike Mullen, a pack of lies. Ambassador Haqqani, has denied claims he was behind the secret memo allegedly delivered to the U.S. Admiral Mullen asking for help in installing a "new security team" in Islamabad that would be friendly to Washington.

AP/PTI

Supporters of Pakistani cricketer-turned-politician Imran Khan condemn U.S. drone attacks in Pakistani tribal areas on al-Qaida and Taliban hideouts, in Islamabad, Pakistan. The U.S. refuses to acknowledge the CIA-run drone program in Pakistan publicly, but officials have said privately that the drone strikes have killed many senior al-Qaida and Taliban commanders.

AP Photo/B.K.Bangash

The remain of a missile reportedly fired by a U. S. drone on a Pakistani tribal village stands on the table, as Imran Khan, Pakistani cricketer-turn-politician addresses a news conference in Islamabad, Pakistan. Khan will rally with the victims of drone attacks before the Parliament to condemn and demanding a halt to U. S. drone strikes in Pakistani tribal areas on hideouts of al-Qaida militants and Taliban along the Afghanistan border.

AP Photo/B.K.Bangash

Pakistani tribal elder Karim Khan shows the remains of a missile reportedly fired by a U. S. drone on a village situated in north Waziristan, killing many people, after his news conference in Islamabad, Pakistan. Suspected U.S. unmanned aircraft fired six missiles at a vehicle in Pakistan's rugged tribal region, killing five militants, including a close ally to one of the area's top commanders, Pakistani intelligence officials said.

AP Photo/B.K.Bangash

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, left, shakes hand with Pakistani Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar following their joint news conference in Islamabad, Pakistan. Clinton said that extremists have been able to operate from Pakistani soil for too long, increasing pressure on Islamabad to crack down on Islamist militants destabilizing Afghanistan who are allegedly supported by the government.

AP/PTI

Visiting U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, left, shakes hand with Pakistan's Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani, prior to their meeting in Islamabad, Pakistan

AP/PTI

Ghafoor Haidari, fourth from right, leader of an anti-US religious party Jamiat Ulema-i-Islam addresses his supporters during an anti-American rally in Islamabad, Pakistan. U.S. pressure on Pakistan to attack Afghan militants on its soil will not succeed, the Pakistani prime minister told a gathering of political and military leaders.

AP Photo/B.K.Bangash

Heil not! US joint chiefs of staff chairman Adml Mike Mullen with Pak’s Gen Kayani

In this photo released by the Press Information Department, Pakistan's Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani, left, talks with opposition leader Nawaz Sharif during an all parties conference in Islamabad, Pakistan. U.S. pressure on Pakistan to attack Afghan militants on its soil will not succeed, the Pakistani prime minister told a gathering of political and military leaders trying to formulate a response to fresh American allegations that the army's spy agency is supporting the insurgents.

AP Photo/Press Information Department/HO

Pakistani protesters burn representation of the U. S. flag and an effigy of U. S. Adm. Mike Mullen, during an anti-American rally in Multan, Pakistan. U.S. pressure on Pakistan to attack Afghan militants on its soil will not succeed, the Pakistani prime minister told a gathering of political and military leaders trying to formulate a response to fresh American allegations that the army's spy agency is supporting the insurgents. Banner reads "Down with America."

AP Photo/Khlaid Tanveer

Members of a civil society burn a U.S. flag during a rally to condemn U.S. allegations that the military's spy agency helped militants attack American targets in Afghanistan in Multan, Pakistan. Relations between Washington and Islamabad are close to crisis point following fresh allegations last week by U.S. officials that Pakistani security forces are helping insurgents attack targets in Afghanistan, including the American embassy last week. Poster in the background show Pakistan's Army Chief Gen. Ashfaq Pervez Kayani.

AP Photo/Khalid Tanveer

Pakistani protesters shout slogans at an anti-American rally in Multan, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Khalid Tanveer

Khurram Wahid (L) and Nina J Ginsberg (R), attorneys of Ghulam Nabi Fai, coming out of the US District Court in Alexandria, Virginia, Washington on July 26 to address the media after the court ordered that the separatist Kashmiri leader be placed under house arrest in electronic surveillance.

PTI Photo by Lalit K Jha

US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Pakistan's Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar pose for photo prior to their meeting at the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Regional Forum in Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia,

PTI

U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Thomas Nides, left, shakes hand with Pakistan's Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani prior to their meeting in Islamabad, Pakistan. Nides arrived in Islamabad for a two-day visit to hold talks with the Pakistani leadership to discuss bilateral, regional and international issues.

AP Photo/Anjum Naveed

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets President of Pakistan Asif Ali Zardari in Islamabad, Pakistan. Clinton said that relations between the United States and Pakistan had reached a turning point after the killing of Osama bin Laden and Islamabad must make "decisive steps" in the days ahead to fight terrorism.

AP Photo/ Press Information Department

Pakistani protesters burn a symbolic U. S. flag during an anti-American rally in Quetta, Pakistan. Visiting U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said that relations between the United States and Pakistan had reached a turning point after the killing of Osama bin Laden and Islamabad must take "decisive steps" in the days ahead to fight terrorism.

AP Photo/Arshad Butt

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton addresses a news conference with Adm. Mike Mullen, the chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff at U. S. embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan. Clinton said that relations between the United States and Pakistan had reached a turning point after the killing of Osama bin Laden and Islamabad must make "decisive steps" in the days ahead to fight terrorism.

AP Photo/ B.K.Bangash

Hafiz Saeed, center, the leader of religious group Jamaat-ud-Dawa, and wanted by Indian government on different counts, joins hands with other leaders at a rally to condemn the United States for the killing of al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden, Sunday, May 15, 2011 in Lahore, Pakistan. Saeed called bin Laden a martyr and demanded the Pakistani government break ties with the United States.

AP/PTI

Activists of a local social group Muthahida Shehri Mahaz, burn a banner depicting U.S. President Barack Obama, during a rally to condemn the killing of al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden, in Multan, Pakistan. As U.S. investigators comb through a treasure trove of computer data and documents seized from Osama bin Laden's home, Pakistani officials face a more domestic task: What to do with three of the slain terrorist leader's wives and eight of his children?

AP Photo/Khalid Tanveer

Supporters of the Pakistani religious party Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam, burn a representation of a U. S. flag during a rally to condemn the killing of al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden, in Kuchlak, 25 kilometers north of Quetta, Pakistan. One of three wives living with Osama bin Laden has told Pakistani interrogators she had been staying in the al-Qaida chief's hideout for six years without leaving its upper floors, a Pakistani intelligence official said.

AP Photo/Arshad Butt

Supporters of a Pakistani religious group Jamaat-e-Islami attend an anti American rally in Abbottabad, Pakistan. Osama bin Laden was killed by a helicopter-borne U.S. military force on May 2, in a fortress-like compound on the outskirts of Abbottabad.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

People chant anti-American slogans during a rally to condemn the killing of al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden, in Multan, Pakistan. Pakistan criticized the American raid that killed Osama bin Laden as an "unauthorized unilateral action," laying bare the strains the operation has put on an already rocky alliance. Placard reads "America should tell who allowed them to arrest Osama bin Laden in Pakistan".

AP/PTI

Hafiz Saeed, leader of the banned Islamic group Jamat-ud-Dawa flanked by party workers leaves premises in Islamabad, Pakistan. Hafiz Saeed is reported to have said that it is very sad that America is negotiating with the Taliban whom it has been beating for the last ten years but on the other hand the US continues drone attacks in Pakistan. This is its double standard and is only to serve its own purposes.

AP Photo/B.K.Banagash

Pakistani police officer refrain protesters from reaching a U. S. embassy during a protest to condemn to condemn American CIA contractor Raymond Allen Davis, in Islamabad, Pakistan. Davis was being held on charges relating to the shooting deaths of two Pakistani men, but was released from prison and left Pakistan after more than $2 million in "blood money" is thought to have been paid to his victims' families and the families pardoned him in accordance with Pakistani law. Arabic written on a flag on left reads " There is no god but God: Muhammad is the Prophet of God".

AP Photo/B.K.Bangash

Pakistani protesters burn an effigy of American CIA contractor Raymond Allen Davis and a U. S. flag during a rally in Peshawar, Pakistan. Davis was being held on charges relating to the shooting deaths of two Pakistani men, but was released from prison and left Pakistan after more than $2 million in "blood money" is thought to have been paid to his victims' families and the families pardoned him in accordance with Pakistani law.

AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad

Rebecca Davis, 44, talks with the media in Highlands Ranch, Colorado. Her husband, Raymond Davis, was released from prison in Pakistan after being pardoned by the families of two men after Davis shot and killed them during an alleged robbery attempt.

AP Photo/ Chris Schneider

Pakistani students rally to condemn the release of an American CIA contractor Raymond Allen Davis, in Peshawar, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Mohammad Sajjad

Pakistani students burn a representation of a U. S. flag during a protest rally to condemn the release of an American CIA contractor Raymond Allen Davis, in Peshawar, Pakistan. Davis was being held on charges relating to the shooting deaths of two Pakistani men, but was released from prison and left Pakistan after more than $2 million in "blood money" is thought to have been paid to his victims' families and the families pardoned him in accordance with Pakistani law.

AP Photo/ Mohammad Sajjad

Mohammed Wasim, center, whose brother Mohammed Fahim was shot and killed by a U. S. consulate employee Raymond Davis, arrives at a central jail where Davis' hearing is going on in Lahore, Pakistan. A Pakistani court declined to rule on whether a detained CIA contractor on trial for killing two Pakistanis has diplomatic immunity as the United States insists, saying it was up to the court hearing the criminal case to decide.

AP Photo/ K.M.Chaudary

A Pakistani police officer escorts detained American Aaron Mark DeHaven, right, at a local court in Peshawar, Pakistan. A lawyer says a Pakistani court has set bail for an American construction contractor held for an expired visa. DeHaven won't be given his passport after posting the $23,500 bail, however, and still faces court hearings.

AP/PTI

Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamaat-i-Islami rally holding a placard reads " The U. S. terrorist and CIA's man Raymond Davis should be hanged," in Karachi, Pakistan. Davis is detained on the charges of killing two Pakistanis but the United States insists Davis, the CIA contractor, has immunity from prosecution.

AP Photo/ Fareed Khan

Pakistani protesters burn an effigy of a U.S. CIA employee Raymond Allen Davis, who is implicated in the shooting deaths of two Pakistanis, during a rally in Lahore, Pakistan. Washington insists Davis is immune from prosecution because he is listed as a U.S. Embassy staff member.

AP Photo/K.M.Chaudary

Pakistani protesters get ready to hang an effigy of a U.S. CIA employee Raymond Allen Davis, who is implicated in the shooting deaths of two Pakistanis, during a rally in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ K.M.Chaudary

A member of a Pakistani civil society holds a poster of U.S. CIA employee Raymond Allen Davis, who is implicated in the shooting deaths of two Pakistanis, during a rally against Davis in Islamabad, Pakistan. Washington insists Davis is immune from prosecution because he is listed as a U.S. Embassy staff member. It says Davis shot two Pakistanis in self-defense when they tried to rob him in the eastern city of Lahore.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

Supporters of the Pakistani religious party Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam rally against American embassy worker Raymond Davis who shot dead two Pakistanis, in the Pakistani border town of Chaman along the Afghanistan border. The U.S. says Davis, was acting in self-defense against robbers and qualifies for diplomatic immunity. But Pakistani authorities have refused to release Davis since the Jan. 27 shooting. Banner and placard in native language read "Raymond Davis should be hanged publicly".

AP/PTI

Detained American Aaron Mark DeHaven, surrounded by Pakistani police officers, leaves after his court appearance in Peshawar, Pakistan. As the US-Pak diplomatic standoff over the arrest of an American for double murder persists, another US national has been held in Pakistan for his alleged illegal stay in the country following expiry of his visa.

AP Photo/ Mohammad Sajjad

Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamaat-u-Dawa hold a rally against an American CIA employee Raymond Allen Davis accused of murdering two Pakistanis, in Lahore, Pakistan. The U.S. says Davis, was acting in self-defense against robbers and qualifies for diplomatic immunity. But Pakistani authorities have refused to release Davis since the Jan. 27 shooting.

AP Photo/ K.M.Chaudary

Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamaat-e-Islami, rally against an American CIA employee Raymond Allen Davis accused of murdering two Pakistanis, in Lahore, Pakistan. Davis refused to sign a charge sheet after claiming diplomatic immunity, official said.

AP Photo/K.M.Chaudary

Supporters of the Pakistani religious party Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam attend a rally against an American embassy worker Raymond Davis who shot dead two Pakistanis, in the Pakistani border town of Chaman along Afghanistan border. The U.S. says Davis, was acting in self-defense against robbers and qualifies for diplomatic immunity. However, Pakistani authorities have refused to release Davis since the Jan. 27 shooting.

AP Photo/Shah Khalid

Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamaat-ud-Dawah rally to condemn a shooting incident involving U.S. Embassy employee Raymond Davis, who was detained by Pakistan authorities for shooting dead two Pakistanis, in Lahore, Pakistan. The U.S. has demanded his release, arguing Davis was acting in self-defense against robbers and has diplomatic immunity from prosecution because he works for the U.S. Embassy.

AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary

Supporters of the Pakistani religious party Jamaat-e-Islami rally against a U. S. consulate employee Raymond Davis who shot dead two Pakistanis, in Peshawar, Pakistan. A judge ordered the arrest of the driver of a U. S. vehicle that struck and killed a Pakistani while rushing to help an American detained in a pair of fatal shootings, a lawyer for the victim's family said. Placard on left reads "who will be hanged, Raymond Davis or Pakistani law".

AP Photo/ Mohammad Sajjad

Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamaat-u-Dawa burn a U. S. flag during a rally to condemn a U. S. consulate employee Raymond Davis who shot dead two Pakistanis, in Lahore. Jammat-u-Dawa, a charity alleged to be a front for the banned militant group Lashkar-e-Taiba, demanded Davis should be hanged.

AP Photo/K.M.Chaudary

Pakistani protesters burn a U. S. flag and effigy of the U. S. Senator John Kerry during a protest against a U. S consulate employee Raymond Davis in Multan, Pakistan. A Pakistani court delayed a hearing Thursday on whether U.S. Embassy worker Raymond Davis who is detained for allegedly fatally shooting two Pakistani men has diplomatic immunity. A placard left, reads "Pakistani court will decide the fate of Reymond Davis".

AP Photo/Khalid Tanveer

US Senator John Kerry, left, meets Pakistan's Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani in Islamabad, Pakistan. Kerry's meeting with Pakistani officials is an indication that the American politician may have a rocky time convincing Pakistan to free a US consulate employee Raymond Davis, allegedly involved in shooting of two Pakistanis.

AP/PTI

Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamat-e-Islami raise their hands as they chant slogans during a rally against Raymond Allen Davis, a U.S. consulate employee suspected in a shooting, in Lahore, Pakistan. Most legal experts in Pakistan's government believe that Davis, who was detained in the fatal shooting of two Pakistanis, has diplomatic immunity, but a court should decide his fate, an official said. The announcement reflected an apparent bid to open the way to the man's release while dampening public outrage.

AP Photo/ K.M. Chaudary

Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamaat-e-Islami burn a U. S. flag during a rally against a U.S. consulate employee in Karachi. A Pakistani judge on Friday ordered that an American, detained in the shooting deaths of two Pakistanis, remain in custody for 14 more days and also told the government it must clarify whether the man has diplomatic immunity as Washington claims.

AP Photo/Fareed Khan

File photo of Raymond Allen Davis a U.S. consulate employee (C) held in the shooting deaths of two Pakistanis taken to a local court in Lahore, Pakistan. Pakistani police said they had framed murder charges against Davis after finding no proof to back his claim that he had shot and killed two men in self-defence, and on the other hand the US has threatened Pak that its envoy will be "kicked out" if it fails to release the American official.

AP Photo/ Hamza Ahmed

A Pakistani demonstrator lays on the ground while others hold a banner during a rally against a U.S. consular employee, suspected in a shooting, in Lahore, Pakistan. A judge ruled that police can keep holding a U.S. Embassy employee accused of killing two Pakistanis for at least eight more days. The U.S. says the American, identified by Pakistanis as Raymond Allen Davis, has diplomatic immunity and that Pakistan must free him. U.S. officials say he shot the two Pakistanis in the city of Lahore because they were trying to rob him.

AP Photo/ K.M. Chaudary

A member of Pakistan's civil society shouts anti U.S. slogans during a rally against a U.S. consular employee, suspected in a shooting incident in Islamabad, Pakistan. Aides to Pakistani's president expressed confidence that Islamabad and Washington could amicably resolve a growing diplomatic crisis over the fate of a former U.S. Special Forces soldier held in the shooting deaths of two Pakistanis.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

Pakistani security officials escort Raymond Allen Davis, a U.S. consulate employee, center, to a local court in Lahore, Pakistan. Aides to Pakistan's president expressed confidence that Islamabad and Washington can amicably resolve a diplomatic crisis over a former U.S. Special Forces soldier held in the shooting deaths of two Pakistanis.

AP Photo/ Hamza Ahmed,

A Pakistani supporter of Hezbul Tahreer party shouts slogans during a rally against a U.S. consular employee, suspected in a shooting, in Karachi, Pakistan. A judge ruled that police can keep holding a U.S. Embassy employee accused of killing two Pakistanis for at least eight more days, officials said. The U.S. says the American, identified by Pakistanis as Raymond Allen Davis, has diplomatic immunity and that Pakistan must free him. U.S. officials say he shot the two Pakistanis in the city of Lahore because they were trying to rob him.

AP Photo/Shakil Adil

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