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Mobile Phones

Director of Ringing Bells, Mohit Goel with CEO, Dhaarna Goel during the launch of Smartphone-Ringing Bells Freedom 251, in New Delhi.

PTI Photo/Manvender Vashist

Selfie On Cellphone At Nitish and Laloo rallies, youngsters record videos of leaders

Shekhar Gupta

Security persons clicking photos of MS Dhoni in their cellphones during the training session prior to the 2nd T20 Match against India at Barabati Stadium in Cuttack.

PTI Photo by Swapan Mahapatra

Jitender Gupta

Indians use their mobile phones

AP

Cell Phone Towers in New Delhi

Tribhuvan Tiwari

Asim Warsi, Vice President of Marketing, IT Mobile Samsung India, displays the newly launched Samsung Galaxy J2 mobile at a press conference in Chennai, Tamil Nadu.

PTI Photo by R Senthil Kumar

Apple CEO Tim Cook discusses the new iPad during the Apple event at the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium in San Francisco.

AP Photo/Eric Risberg

Owning up Young Iranians take selfies on the Tabi’at bridge

AFP (From Outlook 27 July 2015)

West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee launches an app called 'Smart Burdwan' which provides all relevant information about the district, at a function in Burdwan.

PTI Photo/ Swapan Mahapatra

PM Narendra Modi posted this photo on Facebook, saying: Launched 'Narendra Modi Mobile App'. Come, lets stay connected on the mobile! The Mobile App has several innovative features. You can download it from Play Store. Feedback is welcome. nm4.in/nmandroidapp

@narendramodi on Facebook

Huma Quereshi at the launch of Samsung Galaxy S6 & S6 edge mobile in Gurgaon.

PTI Photo

Illustration by Saahil

Amit Haralkar

Sanjay Rawat

Village Man talking on phone in Manpura Machedi village, Jaipur District of Rajasthan

Sanjay Rawat

Delhi Police Commissioner BS Bassi at the launch of HIMMAT Whatsapp & Hike Group at Police HQ in New Delhi.

PTI Photo

Arvind Kejriwal's photo on an AAP supporter's phone.

AP Photo/Altaf Qadri

Union Railway Minister Suresh Prabhu during the launch of a mobile app for safety of the women passengers at the Western Railway headquarters, in Mumbai.

PTI Photo/ Mitesh Bhuvad

Meeting customer needs in a hair saloon

The Delhi High Court permitted Chinese mobile phone maker Xiaomi to sell and import Qualcomm chipset based handsets till January 8, as a temporary measure.

Tim Cook, CEO of Apple.

@tim_cook on Twitter

Minister of State for Information & Broadcasting Prakash Javadekar speaks at a launch of the free News SMS service of All India Radio in four languages viz. Assamese, Gujarati, Tamil and Malayalam, in New Delhi.

PTI Photo/ Vijay Kumar Joshi

A shopkeeper fixes a snap-on mobile phone cover for a customer in Mumbai on April 2, 2014. Snap-on mobile phone covers featuring party symbols, photos and messages of various Indian political parties have flooded the market as entrepreneurs want to cash in on the poll mania that has gripped the country in the run-up to the general elections. India, the world's biggest democracy, announced the start of national elections on April 7 that are expected to bring Hindu nationalist Narendra Modi to power on a platform of economic revival.

AFP PHOTO/ INDRANIL MUKHERJEE

Anna's supporters celebrate at India Gate after he broke his fast in New Delhi on August 28, 2011.

Photo by Sanjay Rawat/ Outlook

A man uses his mobile phone inside a flight.

School children use mobile phones inside the classroom

A girl talks on a mobile phone while driving, in New Delhi.

Photo by Sandipan Chatterjee

Mumbai: Scene at a shop.

Photo by Apoorva Salkade/OUTLOOK

Ghaziabad: What's for breakfast?

Photo by Tribhuvan Tiwari/ Outlook

New Delhi: No phone yet for the newborn.

Photo by Sanjay Rawat/ Outlook

Mayur Vihar, New Delhi: Football? No, thanks.

Photo by Sanjay Rawat/ Outlook

Mumbai: A youngster with his mobile phone.

Photo by Apoorva Salkade/OUTLOOK

Mumbai: Youngsters busy with their phones.

Photo by Apoorva Salkade/OUTLOOK

Mumbai: Volleyball? No, thanks.

Photo by Apoorva Salkade/OUTLOOK

Nashik: A farmer only has time for his mobile phone.

Photo by Apoorva Salkade/OUTLOOK

New Delhi: On their way to work, but already busy.

Photo by Sanjay Rawat/ Outlook

New Delhi: No time for each other or sport, only games on the phone

Photo by Sanjay Rawat/ Outlook

Shiv Nadar University, Gautam Buddha Nagar, Uttar Pradesh: lonesome no more.

Photo by Sanjay Rawat/ Outlook

New Delhi: The young girl has plugged her ears into something else, leaving the family out

Photo by Sanjay Rawat/ Outlook

Roadside, in New Delhi: the couple are together. Or are they?

Photo by Sanjay Rawat/ Outlook

Unto Each... All engaged Thanks to the mobile, commuting to work, even in a shared cab, becomes a solitary pastime

Sanjay Rawat

Poet, lyricist, writer and filmmaker
Gulzar

Diplomat and author
Vikas Swarup It was February 2005, when cellphones were not as ubiquitous. I was working in the office of former foreign minister Natwar Singh. A press conference with British foreign secretary Jack Straw was scheduled at Hyderabad House. The opening statements had barely been made when a mobile began ringing incessantly. Everyone looked around, trying to find the source of the nuisance, till Singh discovered it was coming from inside his own pocket.

Fotocorp (From Outlook 3 November 2014)

Telangana IT minister
K.T. Rama Rao When my daughter was just two and could barely speak, she would fiddle with my smartphone. Worried that she might damage it, I replaced it with an inexpensive phone. Next morning, she unsuspectingly snatched it from me. But in less than a minute she flung it back at me when she figured out it had no touchscreen!

Theatreperson
Makarand Deshpande I am notorious for not answering my phone; it is usually on silent. I do respond on text messages. However, as a performer or director I no longer tell the audience to put their phones off or on silent. Earlier it used to bother me, but I think I have adapted to the disturbance.

Fotocorp (From Outlook 3 November 2014)

Politician
Amar Singh Some years ago, I was sitting with Jaya Bachchan when Dimple Kapadia called me. I could not take the call but instead of switching off I pressed the on button by mistake. As luck would have it, Jaya was busy bitching about Dimple at that time, who could hear every bit on the other side. They had been best buddies, but Dimple didn’t invite Jaya to the Akshay-Tina wedding. I don’t know if my mistake led to a misunderstanding.

Jitender Gupta

Actress
Roopa Ganguly In 2011, I was in Mumbai and had gone out with friends for a movie. While exiting the hall, my mobile slipped out of my grasp. I was frantic, for it had messages from well-known people I did not want anyone to see. I headed back, woke up the guards and offered Rs 5,000 if they found it. One of them fished it out of a trash bag. It was money well-spent.

Filmmaker
Sandip Ray Only two of us in the Bengali film ind­ustry haven’t succumbed to the cha­rms of the mobile. Me and Saswata Chatterjee (Bob Biswas in Kahaani). I don’t need one. I work from home; and a landline sits atop my desk, which I always pick up. When I go for outdoor shoots there are some 200 cellpho­nes between the 80-90-people unit.

Sandipan Chatterjee

Author
Amish Tripathi Mobile phones are delicate babes now but once they were sturdy workmen. I am referring to the brick disguised as the Nokia 5110. Besides hammering nails in, it also made calls. Once, while talking, I drop­ped it from a second-floor balcony. I rushed down to find it in pieces. I fitted the pieces back like a jig­saw puzzle, pressed the power switch, hit the call button and resu­med my conversation!

Politician
Aditya Thackeray I realised how powerful technology has bec­ome at a public rally. All of us were on the stage and I noticed one young party worker taking his selfie near it with all of us in the frame. That shows how everyone is connec­ted and how powerful the social network is.

Apoorva Salkade

Singer
Hariharan While performing in Chennai for the IPL opening I lost my phone. I was left in the lurch! While performing I look farther away into the audience because people texting at the front can be distracting.

Music maestro
Vishwa Mohan Bhat I always wear a kurta, even while taking a walk. But the pocket had a hole through which the phone fell. I realised it later. I hoped someone would be honest enough to return it. I called my number and the man on the other side told me that he wanted to return the mobile. What’s more, he called friends and arra­nged snacks for an impromptu party for me.

CBI director
Ranjit Sinha It is the decline of the dining table conversation that hurts the most. It was often a summit where many family issues got resolved. Now, everyone is glued to their smartphones, and meals have become hurried affairs. Youngsters’ GPS not only helps them navigate, I guess Whatsapp also guides them through the moral and spiritual landscape. Mobile literacy has made us a generation of neo-illiterates.

Narendra Bisht

Actress
Gauhar Khan My dad gifted me my first mobile, a cool red Motorola, when I was in class 11. I almost broke it by dropping it soon after. The one time I was without a mobile for long was in the Bigg Boss house. I didn’t miss it.

Fotocorp (From Outlook 3 November 2014)

Ex-cricketer
Kris Srikkanth My most intimate connect with a mobile was in 2011, as chairman of the selection committee before the World Cup win. I don’t know a great deal about smartphone apps, but, as an expert, I found my phone to be valuable.

AFP (From Outlook 3 November 2014)

Motor racing ace
Narain Karthikeyan I answer hundreds of e-mails and calls every day. Once I get used to an interface I just stick to it. I’ve composed 500-word e-mails on my phone. I find it indispensable.

Actor
Aamir Khan The one thing I’d say about mobile phones is that they are damaging. Damaging to our hea­­lth, work, relationships, to us enjoying a fulfilling life and enjoying anything we do (small things like reading, taking a walk, talking to friends...). Damag­ing! Period! The sooner we stop using them the better. Say I, typing out my answer on a mobile!

PTI

Filmmaker
Dibakar Banerjee No smartphones for me, I need a mobile only to text and make calls. As a receiver of popular wisdom from all corners of mediocrity, I am fascinated by the random SMSes I get. Early in the morning, when you are on the pot, flashes one from the Brahmakumaris: “Silence is the fence around wisdom. If your foot slips, you can regain your balance. But if your tongue slips, you can never recall the word. Gud Mrng.” I presume, by recall they mean retract, but ‘Gud Mrng’?

Ad guru
Alyque Padamsee I am making Jesus Christ Superstar and it has a cast of 50. Because of Whatsapp I am able to keep in touch with them. I wanted a discussion about the play. Ama­zi­ngly, a group discussion had started ins­tantly. My ad line for a mob­ile ad would be ‘it is your umbilical cord to the world’.

Social activist
Shazia Ilmi I cannot think of the Anna Hazare movement without the mobile phone. During it, a Delhi politician made a bold bid at stealing my phone, maybe for all the contacts and the content stored in it. For someone like me, who tweets, mails, sends SMSes, I was lost. I had to lodge an FIR against this gentleman. Like actors who need their shrinks, I need my phone.

Illustration by Saahil

Bharti Kher/(iPhone 5)

Bharti Kher/(iPhone 5)

Atul Kasbekar/(iPhone 5)

Atul Kasbekar/(iPhone 5)

Dinesh Khanna/(iPhone 4)

Dinesh Khanna/(iPhone 4)

Ketaki Sheth/(iPhone 5c)

Ketaki Sheth/(iPhone 5c)

Dayanita Singh/(Samsung S5)

Dayanita Singh/(Samsung S5)

Raghu Rai /(Nokia N90)

Raghu Rai /(Nokia N90)

Raghu Rai /(Nokia N90)

Rural touch A woman living on the outskirts of Jaipur reaches out to a dear one

Sanjay Rawat

A way to share Everyone likes to share videos, audio files, jokes—even porn clips

Sandipan Chatterjee

Wherever you go A Ghaziabad housewife checks YouTube for a recipe

Tribhuvan Tiwari

Friends connected College girls in Lucknow gather in a selfie session

Nirala Tripathi

You don’t need to be rich to be my girl The mobile is a democratic device

AFP (From Outlook 3 November 2014)

Selfie-interest A couple on the Gateway of India in Mumbai

AFP (From Outlook 3 November 2014)

The camera isn’t shy The cellphone is a tool both for privacy and its intrusion

Tribhuvan Tiwari

Illustration by Saahil

Illustration by Saahil

Illustration by Saahil

Tribhuvan Tiwari

Light byte Shashank Bhat, 25, a freelance production and location manager in the advertising field, Whatsapping Taaki buddies

Amit Haralkar

On the move Suyog Kate, an HDFC Ergo executive, catches up with the group while aboard a BEST bus

Amit Haralkar

Home not alone Sachin Dhumal, 36, a marketing professional, trying to snatch some Whatsapp time while being with the boys

Amit Haralkar

Forever wired Pallavi and Dipti, media professionals both, compare notes on Whatsapp

Amit Haralkar

Star cast (L to R) Pallavi Dharap, Alap Korde, Nishant Mhatre, Siddharth Sawant, Mandar Rahate, Shashank Bhat

Amit Haralkar

New biz A grocer’s in Jaipur also offers recharges

Sanjay Rawat

In touch A man using his mobile during Bonalu festivities on the outskirts of Hyderabad

AP

One of Nokia’s rural outdoor campaigns

Actress Gul Panag during the launch of Samsung's The Next Galaxy phone in New Delhi.

PTI Photo/ Atul Yadav

Actress Lara Dutta Bhupathi during the launch of Samsung Galaxy Alpha Android Smartphone in New Delhi.

Photo by Jitender Gupta/ Outlook

Ken Miyauchi, left, vice president of Softbank, Japanese mobile phone company hugs the first customer of iPhone 6 during a ceremony to mark the first day of sales of the new Apple iPhone 6 and 6 Plus at a store in Tokyo.

AP Photo/ Shizuo Kambayashi

People wait to buy the new Apple iPhone 6 and 6 Plus devices, outside an Apple store in Hong Kong. The iPhone 6 and 6 Plus were released on Friday in Hong Kong.

AP Photo/Vincent Yu

Apple CEO Tim Cook introduces the new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus in Cupertino, California.

AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez