United States

‘Heat Dome’ Set To Strike NYC; Follow These Experts' Advice to Stay Cool And Prevent Heat Illness

The US is facing a historic heatwave and a "heat dome" is set to strike the Northeast, with temperatures expected to reach 90 degrees by Tuesday.

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This year, temperatures around the world are at its peak and US is also not out of the scorching heat. A "heat dome" is set to strike the Northeast this week, sending temperatures in New York City soaring past the mid-90s. Residents should brace for what could be a historic heatwave, experts have warned.

The National Weather Service has issued a hazardous weather warning, indicating that the heat index could make it feel like 100 to 105 degrees in New York City, northern New Jersey, and southern Connecticut.  

Starting Tuesday, the temperature is expected to reach about 90 degrees, with further increases forecast for later in the week. AccuWeather predicts the temperature will peak on Thursday and Friday.

Fox Weather meteorologist Steve Bender said that the heat will be exacerbated by stagnant conditions, with little to no breeze to provide relief. Also known as a "heat dome," this phenomenon occurs when a high-pressure system traps hot air below, preventing it from rising and causing temperatures to soar further under clear, sunny skies. The high-pressure system keeps the skies clear — which, in turn, means lots of sunshine that further warms the already-superheated air.

Preparation is key to staying safe during this heatwave. By taking the necessary precautions and staying informed, New Yorkers can navigate the scorching temperatures ahead. Frederic Klein, regional communications manager for the American Red Cross in Greater New York, emphasized the importance of preparation to combat the heat’s effects. Key steps include:

  • Stay Hydrated: Drinking plenty of fluids and staying hydrated is crucial during extreme heat.

  • Wear light and comfortable clothes: Wearing breathable, lightweight clothing and opting for materials that allow your skin to breathe will help to stay cool.

  • Apply Sunscreen: Protect your skin from harmful UV rays.

  • Staying Indoors During Peak Heat: Try to remain inside during the hottest parts of the day, typically mid-afternoon.

  • Watch Out for Heat-Related Illnesses: Be particularly vigilant about the health of the elderly, young, children, and pregnant women.

Identifying the signs of heat-related illnesses is very critical. Heat cramps, which includes muscle pains and spasms in the legs or abdomen, are often the first sign. Heat exhaustion follows, with symptoms such as heavy sweating, nausea, dizziness, weakness, and cool, moist, and pale skin. Immediate actions include moving to a cooler place, drinking water, and resting.

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The most severe condition, heat stroke, is life-threatening and marked by hot, red skin, vomiting, and unconsciousness. Immediate medical attention is required in such cases.

New Yorkers should also be aware that there will not be much relief during the night as well, as overnight temperatures will remain high. This sustained warmth can increase the risk of heat stress.

Experts also caution that the excessive use of air conditioners could strain the power grid. To mitigate this, Klein advises residents to locate their nearest cooling center in advance. The city disseminates information about these centers, making it easier for residents to find a cool refuge if needed.

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