photos

Pakistan: Minorities

In this photo provided by Press Information Department, Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan, center, and other officials listen to families of the Shiite Hazara community's coal mine workers, who were killed by gunmen near the Machh coal field, at a meeting, in Quetta, Pakistan. Hundreds of Pakistani Shiites gathered to bury 11 coal miners from the minority Hazara community who were killed by the Islamic State group, ending over a week of protests that sought to highlight the minority community's plight.

Photo by AP/PTI

Women wing of Shiromani Akali Dal Delhi along with several people from the Sikh community stage a candle light protest against the abduction of a 17-year-old Sikh girl in Pakistan's Punjab province, at Teen Murti in New Delhi. The minor girl is reported to be the daughter of head granthi of historic Panja Sahib Gurdwara in Hassan Abdal city.

PTI Photo/Ravi Choudhary

Pakistani Christians visit the site of a vandalized church in a village near Lahore, Pakistan. Pakistani police say a group of armed men vandalized the church Saturday and took down the cross from its entrance door in the village in eastern Punjab province before fleeing the scene. The incident was apparently not sectarian but connected to a land dispute involving the church.

Photo by AP/PTI

Security personnel stop members of Sikh community, who were staging a protest against alleged conversion of minorities in Pakistan, near Pakistan High Commission in New Delhi. In yet another incident of conversion of girls from minority communities in Pakistan, a 19-year-old Sikh girl was allegedly abducted and converted to Islam before being married to a Muslim man in the country's Punjab province.

PTI Photo/Kamal Kishore

Members of the Pakistani Hindu community hold lamps during a tribute to Pakistan's renowned social worker and legendary philanthropist, Abdul Sattar Edhi, in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Fareed Khan

Women pray during an Easter service at St Anthony's Church in Lahore, Pakistan. Christians across the world are celebrate Easter, commemorating the day followers believe Jesus was resurrected in Jerusalem over 2,000 years ago.

AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary

People pray next to a depiction of the crucifixion of Jesus Christ during on Good Friday at a church in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP Photo/K M Chaudary

Pakistani Hindu women mourn the deaths of their family members in Tando Muhammad Khan near Hyderabad. A Pakistani police officer says a numbers of people have died after consuming illegally-made alcohol during religious celebrations in southern Pakistan.

AP/PTI

Children prepare for Christmas in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/B.K. Bangash, File

A woman prays during service at St. John's Catholic Church which was attacked by the Taliban last March, in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP/PTI

Pakistani lawmakers light candles and pray for the victims of a bus attack in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP/PTI

A Pakistani security official displays cartridges he collected from the scene of an attack on a bus, in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Fareed Khan

Pakistani paramilitary troops stand guard outside a local hospital following an attack on a bus in Karachi, Pakistan. Heavily-armed militants donning police uniforms attacked a bus carrying Shia Ismaili Muslims and shot them in the head, killing at least 47 people and leaving behind a pamphlet of ISIS claiming responsibility for the grisly attack in Pakistan's port city of Karachi.

AP Photo/ Fareed Khan

People pray during an Easter service at a church in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP/PTI

People pray during a Sunday Mass service in St. John's Catholic Church, which was attacked by a suicide bomber on March 15, in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP/PTI

People mourn during the mass funeral service of victims of a pair of suicide attacks on two churches in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP/PTI

People carry caskets of the victims of a pair of suicide attacks on two churches during a mass funeral service in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP/PTI

Women mourn as they gather at a church damaged from a suicide bombing attack in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP/PTI

A Pakistani Christian bride is carried by her cousin to her groom's makeshift home to attend her wedding ceremony at a slum home to Christian families on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

People take part in a prayers ceremony for the victims of the Peshawar attack, at St. Patrick Cathedral in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP/PTI

Men mourning the death of a provincial lawmaker, Handery Masieh, at a local hospital in Quetta, Pakistan. Masieh's bodyguard shot and killed him during a meeting in southwest Pakistan, police said. Government spokesman Jan Muhammad Buledi said the bodyguard later fled and the police are trying to arrest him. "We do not know why the guard killed Handery Masieh, and everything will be clear when we arrest him," he told reporters.

AP Photo/Arshad Butt

Pakistani Christians attend a Palm Sunday mass at the St. Anthony church in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP/ PTI

Residents of Islamabad's slums protest against the demolition of their localities, in Pakistan. Pakistani authorities plan to demolish these slums, mostly occupied by Christians and people displaced in tribal areas and neighboring Afghanistan, saying it poses a security threat to the already vulnerable capital.

AP Photo/B.K. Bangash

Pakistani Christians attend Christmas mass in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary

Pakistani police officers stand guard outside a Church during Christmas mass in Peshawar, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad

Pakistanis help victims of a suicide attack at a church in Peshawar, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad

Ramesh Singh Arora (2nd left) greeted after taking oath

PTI

A Pakistani girl walks by a tent covered with a banner showing cricket legend-turned politician Imran Khan, in a Christian slum on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

Their land Pakistani Hindus at the Hinglaj Mata temple, Balochistan

Reuters (From Outlook 08 April 2013)

A Pakistani Christian woman reacts after her home was damaged by an angry Muslim mob in Lahore, Pakistan

AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary

People raise their hands during the funeral of victims killed from Sunday evenings' car bombing that killed dozens of people, in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Shakil Adil

Pakistani Shiite Muslim women light candles during a demonstration to condemn Sunday's car bombing that killed dozens of people, in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Anjum Naveed

Pakistani children hold candles at the site of Saturday's bombing, in Quetta, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Arshad But

Pakistani Shiite families block a main highway of Islamabad, to protest against Shiites' killings in Quetta in Pakistan.

AP Photo/B.K. Bangash

A Pakistani woman is comforted by other relatives while grieving over the body of her brother Mohammed Ali, who was killed in Saturday's bombing, in Quetta, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Arshad Butt

Pakistani Shiite Muslims sit in protest next to the dead bodies of their family members killed in bombing, in Quetta. The protesters have refused to bury victims of the attack until authorities take action against the militants who were responsible. Writing on shrouds reads, "We are ready Hussain."

AP Photo/Arshad Butt

Pakistani relatives of Saturday's bombing victims mourn next to their bodies in a mosque in Quetta, Pakistan. The toll of the Quetta blasts has risen to 84.

AP Photo/Arshad Butt

A little girl holds a placard against the killings of Shiite Muslims in deadly bombings last week in Quetta, Pakistan, during a protest rally in Bangalore.

AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi

Shiite Muslim women hold placards as they protest against the killings of Shiite Muslims in deadly bombings last week in Quetta, Pakistan, during a protest rally in Bangalore.

AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi

Shiite Muslim women hold placards as they protest against the killings of Shiite Muslims in deadly bombings last week in Quetta, Pakistan, during a protest rally in Bangalore.

AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi

Pakistani Shiite Muslims get ready to offer funeral prayers for victims of Thursday's twin bombing at a billiards hall in Quetta, Pakistan.

AP/PTI

Pakistani Shiite Muslims, chant slogans during a protest to condemn Thursday's deadly bombings in Quetta, in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Shakil Adil

Pakistani Shiite Muslims sit next to bodies and await the burial of their relatives and friends who were killed in Thursday's deadly bombings, during a protest in Quetta, Pakistan.

AP/PTI

Pakistani Shiite Muslims chant slogans next to the bodies of their relatives awaiting burial, who were killed in Thursday's deadly bombings, at a protest rally in Quetta, Pakistan. Shiites in a southwestern Pakistani city hit by a brutal terror attack refused to bury their dead in protest, demanding that the government do something to protect them from what has become a barrage of bombings and shootings against the minority Muslim sect.

AP Photo/Arshad Butt

Members of Pakistani Hindu community sit next to the rubble of a temple, which was destroyed on by a builder, in Karachi. Members of the Pakistan Hindu community in the southern port city of Karachi protested over the destruction of a temple by a builder who claimed that the land is his.

AP Photo/Fareed Khan

Displaced Hindus from Pakistan celebrate Diwali festival in Jodhpur.

PTI Photo

Pakistani Christians chant slogans during a protest to condemn the attack on a 14-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on Tuesday Oct. 9, 2012 by the Taliban for speaking out in support of education for women, in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary

Pakistani bride Shabana Gill, 20, is flanked by relatives and friends while walking to a church for her wedding procession, in a Christian neighborhood in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

Rajasthan Chief Minister Ashok Gehlot interacts with a group of Hindus from Pakistan at the airport in Jodhpur. They have arrived India on religious pilgrimage.

PTI Photo

Pakistani police official and a Christian volunteer a young Christian girl, center, accused of blasphemy, toward a helicopter following her release from central prison outskirts of Rawalpindi, Pakistan. The girl, accused of burning pages from the Quran, has been freed from jail near the capital.

AP Photo/Anjum Naveed

Media men and local residents gather outside a mosque, where police arrested a Muslim cleric Khalid Chishti, in a suburb of Islamabad, Pakistan. In the latest twist in a religiously charged case that has focused attention on the country's harsh blasphemy laws, Pakistani police arrested Chishti who they say planted evidence in the case of a Christian girl accused of blasphemy.

AP Photo/Anjum Naveed

Pakistani police officers escort blindfolded Muslim cleric Khalid Chishti to appear in court in Islamabad, Pakistan. In the latest twist in a religiously charged case that has focused attention on the country's harsh blasphemy laws, Pakistani police arrested Chishti who they say planted evidence in the case of a Christian girl accused of blasphemy.

AP Photo/Anjum Naveed

A Pakistani Christian youth wearing a mask, stands in a vehicle in a Christian neighborhood in Islamabad, Pakistan. Pakistani authorities arrested a Christian girl and are investigating whether she violated the country's strict blasphemy laws after furious neighbors surrounded her house and demanded police action, a police officer said.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

A Hindu family from Pakistan arrives at Wagah border near Amritsar. About 150 Hindus Pakistan crossed over to India in fear of persecution, after promising the Pak govt that they would not ask the Indian govt for asylum and would return after 30 days.

PTI Photo/Deepak Sharma

A Pakistani man displays Christmas ornaments in his shop in Hyderabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Pervez Masih

Mourners attend funeral prayer of the victims of Tuesday's shooting incident in Quetta, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Arshad Butt

Pakistani Shiite Muslim women and children shout slogans to condemn the killing of their community members in Tuesday's shooting incident in Quetta, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Arshad Butt

People from Pakistani Christian community attend Good Friday prayers on April 22, 2011 at a local church in Lahore, Pakistan. Good Friday is a solemn day when Christians reflect on the suffering and crucifixion of Christ.

AP Photo/K.M.Chaudary

Sikh pilgrims attend rituals during the Baisakhi festival in Hasan Abdal, Pakistan. The three-day Baisakhi festival of the Sikh community started at Gurdawara Punja Sahib with the participation of Sikhs from India, Pakistan and other countries.

AP/PTI

SHAHBAZ BHATTI, Pak minister for minority affairs and one of the few critics left of the land’s rabid blasphemy laws. Was the cabinet’s only Christian.

Pakistani Christians shower rose-petals on the casket of their slain leader Shahbaz Bhatti during a funeral in his native village Khushpur near Faisalabad, Pakistan. Shirtless men beat their chests and women wailed in grief as the body of a Christian politician killed for opposing Pakistan's harsh blasphemy laws was buried in his home village. In the capital, the prime minister promised mourners at a funeral Mass that the government would do its utmost to bring the assassins to justice.

AP Photo/Anjum Naveed

A Pakistani Christian woman mourns the death of Shahbaz Bhatti, holding his picture outside his home in Islamabad, Pakistan. Hundreds of Christians demonstrated against the slaying of the Catholic government minister who had long been their most prominent advocate in the Muslim-majority country demanding justice.

AP Photo/B.K.Bangash

Pakistani Christians rally against the killing of Catholic government minister Shahbaz Bhatti, in Lahore, Pakistan. Hundreds of Pakistani Christians and others demonstrated demanding justice to nab killers of Bhatti.

AP Photo/K.M.Chaudary

People comfort a Christian woman who mourns the death of Pakistan's government minister for religious minorities Shahbaz Bhatti outside a mortuary in Islamabad. Gunmen shot and killed Bhatti, the latest attack on a high-profile Pakistani figure threatened by Islamist militants for urging reform of harsh blasphemy laws that impose the death penalty for insulting Islam.

AP Photo/B.K.Bangash

A security officer is reflected in the bullets-riddled window of the car of slain Pakistan's government minister for religious minorities Shahbaz Bhatti outside an emergency ward of a local hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani, second from right, and family members of Pakistan's slain government minister for religious minorities Shahbaz Bhatti, gather around his body at a local hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan. Gunmen shot and killed Bhatti, the latest attack on a high-profile Pakistani figure threatened by Islamist militants for urging reform of harsh blasphemy laws that impose the death penalty for insulting Islam.

AP Photo/ Pakistan Press Information Department

Relative of Pakistan's government minister for religious minorities Shahbaz Bhatti mourns over his death outside a local hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

A security officers looks at the bullets holes on the damaged car of slain Pakistan's government minister for religious minorities Shahbaz Bhatti outside the emergency ward of a local hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

A Pakistani looks into the blood-stained damaged car of slain Pakistan's government minister for religious minorities Shahbaz Bhatti, outside emergency the ward of a local hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

A supporter of Pakistan's government minister for religious minorities Shahbaz Bhatti mourns over his death outside a local hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

A Pakistani cameraman films the blood-stained damaged car of slain Pakistan's government minister for religious minorities Shahbaz Bhatti outside the emergency ward of a local hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

In this May 16, 2007 file photo, Shahbaz Bhatti, then head of the All Pakistan Minorities Alliance, displays a threatening letter which a Christian resident of Charsadda town received, during a press conference in Islamabad, Pakistan. Shahbaz Bhatti, a vocal critic of the controversial blasphemy law, was shot dead by gunmen who ambushed his car near his residence, the second high-profile politician to be assassinated in nearly two months.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed, File

PML(Q) leader Marvi Memon meets Lal Gulshan and members of the Hindu community

Garji, the abducted Hindu spiritual leader

A rally in Quetta protesting the deteriorating law and order situation

People rally to protest against any attempt to modify the Blasphemy law near the house of Mumtaz Qadri who assassinated a liberal Pakistani governor, in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Islamic extremists rallied in support of the confessed killer of a liberal Pakistani governor and protested against Pope Benedict XVI for urging the scrapping of blasphemy laws that stipulate death for those insulting Islam.

AP Photo/B.K.Bangash

Malik Mumtaz Hussain Qadri, center, the accused killer of Punjab's Gov. Salman Taseer, arrives at court, in Islamabad, Pakistan. More than 500 Muslim scholars praised the man suspected of killing a Pakistani governor because the politician opposed blasphemy laws that mandate death for those convicted of insulting Islam. The group of scholars and clerics known as Jamaat Ahle Sunnat is affiliated with a moderate school of Islam and represents the mainstream Barelvi sect. The group said in a statement that no one should pray for Taseer or express regret for his murder.

AP/PTI

Supporters of Pakistani religious parties, one of them holding a flag bearing the names of Prophet Muhammad, attend a rally to protest against any attempts to modify blasphemy laws, Islamabad, Pakistan. A strike in favor of Pakistan's controversial blasphemy laws has led businesses to shut down and buses to stay off the streets in many parts of this Muslim country. Banner at bottom reads 'Changes in the blasphemy laws are unacceptable'.

AP/PTI

A Pakistani supporter of the Islamic parties alliance shouts slogans during a rally in Karachi. Thousands of supporters of Islamic parties rallied in Pakistan against any attempts to change the country's blasphemy laws. Islamic parties have been upset since a top government official helped file a mercy petition with President's office, requesting a pardon for Asia Bibi, a Christian woman sentenced to death for blasphemy.

AP Photo/Fareed Khan

A supporter of Pakistani religious party Jamat-i-Islami wearing a headband reads "God Mohammad", participates in a rally demanding the execution of the Christian woman Asia Bibi, in Karachi, Pakistan. Pakistan's president will not immediately pardon the Christian woman sentenced to die for insulting Islam but may do so later if an appeals court delays her case too long, an official said.

AP/PTI

Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamat-i-Islami rally demanding execution of the Christian woman Asia Bibi in Karachi, Pakistan. Pakistan's president will not immediately pardon the Christian woman sentenced to die for insulting Islam but may do so later if an appeals court delays her case too long, an official said.

AP Photo/Fareed Khan

Supporters of Pakistani religious parties rally against Christian woman Asia Bibi in Islamabad, Pakistan. A lawyer says a Pakistani court has barred the country's president from pardoning a Christian woman sentenced to death for blasphemy before it rules on her appeal.

AP Photo/B.K.Bangash

Hardline Pakistani cleric Maulana Yousef Qureshi, center, addresses a rally against Christian woman Asia Bibi in Peshawar, Pakistan. Qureshi offered a reward of US$6,000 to anyone who kills Asia Bibi. Pakistan's president will not immediately pardon the Christian woman sentenced to die for insulting Islam but may do so later if an appeals court delays her case too long, an official said.

AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad

Pakistani Christian protesters rally to condemn the arrest of Christian woman Asia Bibi in Karachi, Pakistan. Pakistan's president will not immediately pardon the Christian woman sentenced to die for insulting Islam but may do so later if an appeals court delays her case too long, an official said.

AP Photo/Fareed Khan

Pakistani Sheedi devotees celebrate during the crocodile festival at a shrine of famous saint Khawaja Hasan in suburb of Karachi, Pakistan. The yearly festival attended by Sheedis, whose ancestors are believed to have been brought to the subcontinent as slaves from Africa, is performed to pay homage to the crocodiles who are presumed to hold mystical powers.

AP Photo/Fareed Khan

Ethnic Pakistani Sheedi women, their faces covered by shawlsl, dance to the beat of a traditional drum during the crocodile festival at a shrine of saint Khawaja Hasan in suburb of Karachi, Pakistan. The yearly festival attended by Sheedis, whose ancestors are believed to have been brought to the subcontinent as slaves from Africa, is performed to pay homage to the crocodiles who are presumed to hold mystical powers.

AP Photo/Fareed Khan

Pakistani Sheedi women, some of their faces covered with shawls, dance to the beat of a traditional drum during the crocodile festival at a shrine of saint Khawaja Hasan in a suburb of Karachi, Pakistan. The yearly festival attended by Sheedis, whose ancestors are believed to have been brought to the subcontinent as slaves from Africa, is performed to pay homage to the crocodiles who are presumed to hold mystical powers.

AP Photo/Fareed Khan

Terror struck A bloodied worshipper being carried out

AFP (From Outlook, June 14)

Mourning after Grief-stricken Ahmadis

AP

People mourn the death of loved ones in the May 28 attack on two Ahmadi mosques in Lahore. At least 80 people were killed and dozens wounded.

AP Photo/Anjum Naveed

A Pakistani child walks in the Christian neighborhood of Khashi Kaluni in Islamabad, Pakistan

AP Photo/Vincent Thian