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Chandrayaan-3's Pragyan Rover Successfully Rolls Out Of Vikram Lander, To Explore Lunar Surface For 14 Days

Following this historic feat, the Pragyan rover gracefully rolled out onto the lunar surface, poised to embark on a pivotal scientific mission.

Pragyan rover gracefully rolled out onto the lunar surface.
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In a historic achievement, India's Chandrayaan-3 lunar mission has achieved a flawless landing on Wednseday, marking a significant step in lunar exploration. The spacecraft touched down near the South Pole of the moon, setting the stage for groundbreaking scientific discoveries.

One of the most awaited moments was the deployment of the Pragyan rover, designed to gather invaluable data from the moon's surface. However, this step had to be carefully timed due to the unique lunar environment. The lingering concern was the lunar dust stirred up by the Vikram lander's touchdown, which behaved differently due to the moon's lower gravity compared to Earth's. To prevent potential damage to the rover's delicate equipment, scientists patiently awaited the dissipation of the dust, according to NDTV reports. 

ISRO Chief S Somnath had previously mentioned that this process could take up to a day, but to the delight of the world, it took only a matter of hours for the conditions to be deemed suitable for the rover's rollout. "We are looking at a very exciting time after Pragyan's entry... It will do experiments for 14 days," Mr. Somnath stated, reflecting the optimism surrounding the mission.

ISRO has equipped the Lander and Rover of the Chandrayaan-3 mission with a total of five cutting-edge scientific payloads, all ingeniously housed within the Lander Module (LM). The Rover's Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) is primed to unlock insights into the lunar surface's chemical and mineralogical composition, greatly enriching our comprehension of its makeup, according to PTI reports.

Moreover, the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscope (LIBS) is set to revolutionize lunar exploration by precisely identifying the elemental composition of lunar soil and rocks encircling the Moon's landing zone. This pioneering deployment of the Rover for on-site scientific experiments promises to elevate lunar missions to unprecedented heights, as highlighted by ISRO.

The duration of activity for both the Lander and Rover is pegged at 1 Lunar Day, equivalent to a span of 14 Earth days. Among the Lander's own payloads, RAMBHA-LP (Langmuir Probe) stands out for its role in capturing near-surface plasma density changes over time, offering crucial insights into the lunar environment's dynamics.

Meanwhile, ChaSTE (Chandra's Surface Thermo Physical Experiment) is gearing up to reveal the thermal characteristics of the polar region's lunar surface, contributing to our understanding of its temperature fluctuations. Lastly, the Instrument for Lunar Seismic Activity (ILSA) is poised to measure seismic events around the landing area, while simultaneously unveiling the intricate architecture of the lunar crust and mantle.

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