United States

Is Tropical Storm Lee going to hit Florida? Here is what we know

Tropical Storm Lee is evolving and is raising concerns. Amid the chaos the question arises, is the storm approaching to hit Florida and other areas in the US?

Tropical Storm Lee
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On Tuesday afternoon, Tropical Storm Lee developed in the Atlantic Ocean, which is located far to the east of the United States. By the upcoming weekend, it is predicted to become a major hurricane with wind gusts close to 150 mph. 
The most frequently asked question relates to its course and potential impact on the United States. Analysts say anyone with interests in the Caribbean, the East Coast, and places like Maine should keep a close eye on this weather event. Depending on the trajectory this system takes, it is projected that potential impacts on the United States and Atlantic Canada could occur between September 13 and 16.
Lee has wind speeds of 65 mph and is located more than 1,200 miles to the east of the Caribbean islands, according to the most recent update from the National Hurricane Centre. According to hurricane expert Eric Blake in the center's bulletin, while it is anticipated that the hurricane may have an impact on the Leeward islands by the weekend, it is still too early to tell how closely it will hit these islands.
According to experts, there could be favorable circumstances for Tropical Storm Lee to strengthen because of a decrease in wind shear along its course and the presence of warm ocean temperatures at about 86 degrees Fahrenheit. Additionally, according to a number of models, Lee might reach wind speeds that are higher than those shown in the most recent forecast from the National Hurricane Centre. Storm development is hampered by wind shear, whereas storm intensification is fueled by warm water.
According to reports, recent indicators suggest that the storm's path may change dramatically, covering a wide area from the coastal region northward towards eastern Canada, or it may even swerve completely away from the coast.
Although there isn't universal agreement among all the models used by meteorologists, several of them show that the hurricane is expected to move northward in the Atlantic. The Atlantic Coast, which stretches from Florida to Nova Scotia, might be seriously threatened if it deviates much west along its course.
The center of the storm will likely travel along the forecast course. It does not, however, accurately portray the storm's full breadth or the depth of its impacts. There is a chance of up to 33% that the storm's center will diverge from this course and travel outside the cone of uncertainty.
 

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