Travel

6 Cocktails Named After Cities

From the West to the East, from Manhattan to London, sit back, relax, and take a sip of history.

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Cocktails named after cities
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What's in the name of a city? Simply mentioning "New York," "Paris," or "London" might evoke thoughts of a sophisticated lifestyle and impressive buildings. However, the term means more in some of the most well-known and adored cities: a cocktail.

Here are 6 drinks named after cities: 


Manhattan

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         Manhattan cocktail     Shutterstock

The Manhattan, which originated in New York City's Manhattan Club, is at the top of the list. The drink is swirled and filtered after being made with whiskey, sweet vermouth, and bitters. Cherry is placed on top to finish it. Tennessee whiskey, Canadian whiskey, Bourbon, or blended whiskey are the most often used whiskeys. 

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 Singapore Sling

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      Singapore sling cocktail     Shutterstock

The Singapore Sling has become as well-known as the nation itself, winning over many people's hearts and stomachs. It was first created by Ngiam Tong Boon in 1915 for the Raffles Hotel in Singapore and has since gained popularity all over the world. Sounds scrumptious, no? Today, there are numerous versions of this gin sling.

The Brooklyn

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The Brooklyn cocktail Shutterstock

Long before Brooklyn became known for hipster bars and speciality cocktails, there was a cocktail called the Brooklyn. It is also a whiskey-based cocktail, like the Manhattan. The Brooklyn cocktail is prepared in a martini glass with whiskey, dry vermouth, maraschino liqueur, Angostura bitters, and an orange peel garnish.

Blue Hawaii 

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      Blue Hawaii cocktail    Shutterstock

This drink was created in the 1950s by famed head bartender Harry Yee of the Hilton Hawaiian Village (formerly the Kaiser Hawaiian Village) in Waikiki, Hawaii, as a way to accentuate the blue hue of their Curacao liqueur. It is a prime example of a bartender's creativity.

Moscow Mule

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Moscow mule cocktail Shutterstock

The Moscow Mule is not a Russian export, despite its name. It was created by the proprietor of a struggling Smirnoff in the 1950s. It's one of the most popular cocktails available today.

London Buck

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       London buck cocktail Shutterstock

A popular summer cooler during the Roaring Twenties was the straightforward, sweet, and fizzy Gin Buck, also known as a London Buck or a Ginger Rogers ( the actress of the same name). The Buck's Club in London in the 1920s gave rise to the drink known as the London Buck, which is where the term "Buck" originated.

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