Thursday, Jan 20, 2022
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Makar Sankranti | Kites Soar High Amid Omicron Scare

Amid Omicron fears and restrictions, people in Jaipur are spotted in their terrace and the sky filled with colourful kites.

Makar Sankranti | Kites Soar High Amid Omicron Scare
Kites festival in Jaipur. -

Paper kites of a hundred different colours and jovial groups of kite fliers in groups celebrating Makar Sankranti. It is festive time in the Pink City, Jaipur. 

As Jitendra Sharma, owner of Jitendra Studio and resident from Chandpole Bazar said, “Flying kites has been the tradition of Sankranti every year in Jaipur. Families get together and share sweet delicacies such as Finni, Ghewar and Gajak, this is an old tradition.”


Credit: Bhanvi Sharma

Yogita, a student and resident from Gangori Bazar describes, “There are certain exclamations that one definitely hears at the terrace such as wohkatte, dheeldena, tang dalna, lapetna, penchladana . The highlight of the evening of Sankranti is that one  gets to spend it with their loved ones and the sight of the sky is beautiful.”


Credit: Bhanvi Sharma

Sajal Khandelwal, the owner of Sambariya Finni Wale, a 150-year-old sweet shop at Chandpole Bazar, said, “The footfall of the customers have been pretty good over the last 2-3 days and the mornings are usually a rush but eventually the rush fades. The weekend and night curfew is a reason as we have to close our shops by 8 pm. But I cannot say that we have incurred losses.”


Credit: Bhanvi Sharma

Ankit, owner of kite business at Mishraji Karasta said, “Round the year we sell kites as it’s our business but our major season for business in January because of Sankranti. People have a craze for flying kites here and some even see it as more than just a leisure activity. The price of a kite starts from Rs 3 and a charkha starts from Rs 300.”

He added, “The market is not dull and the weekend curfew has benefitted us as most of the people have bought kites to spend their weekend flying them.”


Credit: Bhanvi Sharma

Madhavlalji, owner of a kite business in Choti Chaupad said, “Kite sales took its pace, especially in these last three days as Sankranti approached. Although, the pandemic did hinder the sales but not so much.”


Credit: Bhanvi Sharma

January 14 is celebrated as Makar Sankranti and the day is devoted to Suraj Bhagwan or the Sun God. The Hindu festival in the state not only is about flying kites but also about worshipping Surya devta which is followed by offering Daan (donations) usually done by the women of every house. Women pray with 14 items that are donated to people in need after the puja.

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