Business Spotlight

What Are the Best Password Managers?

Safest password manager software list - create and store strong, unique passwords for all your online accounts, protecting you from identity theft and cyberattacks.

Best Password Managers
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The age of writing down passwords in a notebook is far behind us. With the ever-growing cyber threats, having a secure place to store all our passwords has become indispensable. Password managers are software applications designed for this purpose. They safely store, retrieve, and help manage complex passwords from a secure vault. It employs strong encryption to keep this data safe and requires a master password for access. There are both free and paid solutions available, but the functionality of each may differ.   

Free password managers like Chrome, Samsung, or iCloud Keychain are usually platform-specific and come integrated with their respective ecosystems. While they offer basic password storage and autofill capabilities, they are limited in cross-platform functionality and may lack advanced features like secure password sharing, robust security audits, or encrypted file Vault. 

On the other hand, paid or shareware password managers often provide enhanced features, broader platform compatibility, more robust security measures, multi-device synchronization, and dedicated customer support. These paid options offer a comprehensive solution for managing passwords across various devices and platforms, catering to users seeking a higher level of security and convenience. So let’s have a closer look at the options available on the market and figure out their pros and cons.  

Top tested picks: Editor's Choice 

Choosing the right password manager depends on one's specific needs and preferences. Whether prioritizing ease of use, top-notch security, or a balanced combination of features, there is a variety of solutions deserving of the Editor's Choice label, each excelling in its own right to protect and manage passwords in the digital realm. 

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Platforms supported: iPhone, Android, Windows, macOS, browser extensions, Web 

Import/export from browsers: Excellent 

Data import/migration: Excellent 

2FA: Supported 

Filling web forms: Simple 

Secure sharing: Available 

Offline storage: Available 

Price: Fair 

Pros: bulletproof encryption, multiplatform, convenient migration, qualified customer support service, password vulnerability detection, duress mode, TFA, zero-knowledge architecture. 

Cons: Advanced functionality is available on a paid plan 

Passwarden is a bulletproof password management solution, developed by KeepSolid, reliable and well-recognized in the community of those who value digital security. Both tech-savvies and ordinary users highly rate all the features and convenience offered by this complete security app.  

This password manager has quickly gained acclaim for its unwavering commitment to security. Using cutting-edge encryption standards, Passwarden ensures that user data remains impenetrable. Its user-friendly interface and seamless cross-platform synchronization make password management effortless. Passwarden also offers secure file Vaults and reliable password-sharing options, setting it apart as a comprehensive solution for those seeking both ease of use and top-tier security. Its rapidly growing popularity positions Passwarden as a strong contender among Editor's Choice picks in the competitive landscape of password managers. 

Platforms supported: iOS, macOS 

Import/export from browsers: Average 

Data import/migration: Partially supported 

2FA: Not Available 

Filling web forms: Not Supported 

Secure sharing: Not Available 

Offline storage: Available 

Price: Fair 

Pros: Robust security, smooth interface. 

Cons: Limited platform support, no secure sharing, lack of essential features. 

Strongbox is a password manager that supports only iOS and macOS platforms. While it doesn't offer native browser extensions for auto-filling, it provides compatibility with the KeePass format, facilitating easy data migration. Although it lacks native two-factor authentication for its own access. The software emphasizes local offline storage, allowing users to choose their sync methods. It doesn’t have a set of crucial password management features like secure sharing, convenient data import, cross-platformity, security dashboards, etc. As for pricing, while specifics can vary, users often view its cost as reasonable, given its comprehensive feature set.  

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Platforms supported: iPhone, Android 

Import/export from browsers: Good 

Data import/migration: Supported 

2FA: Available 

Filling web forms: Good 

Secure sharing: Available 

Offline storage: Available 

Price: Fair 

Pros: Seamless integration, secure sharing options. 

Cons: No offline storage. 

LogMeOnce is a versatile password manager offering a range of benefits. Its standout feature is its emphasis on security, utilizing advanced encryption and multifactor authentication to safeguard sensitive data. The platform provides a user-friendly interface, making it easy to generate and manage complex passwords. LogMeOnce offers additional features like password sharing and a secure digital wallet, enhancing its utility. However, some users may find the interface overwhelming or overly complex, especially if they're new to password managers. Additionally, certain advanced features may require a premium subscription, limiting access for free users. Despite these minor drawbacks, LogMeOnce remains a reliable choice for those seeking robust password management and enhanced security. 

Platforms supported: iPhone, Android, Web, browsers 

Import/export from browsers: Available 

Data import/migration: Good 

2FA: Supported 

Filling web forms: Available 

Secure sharing: Supported 

Offline storage: Available 

Price: Positioned as a free option 

Pros: Multi-platform, great data migration. 

Cons: Customer support could be better. No live chat.  

Psono is a noteworthy password manager with several commendable features. Its main strength lies in its commitment to security, employing strong encryption protocols and allowing users to host the application on their own server for added control and privacy. The platform offers a clean and intuitive interface, making password organization and access management simple and efficient. Psono also supports two-factor authentication and offers mobile apps, enhancing its versatility. On the downside, the self-hosted option requires technical expertise to set up and maintain, potentially limiting accessibility for less tech-savvy users. Additionally, certain advanced features may only be available in the paid version, restricting access for free users.  

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  • Platforms supported: iPhone, Android, Chrome OS, Firefox 
  • Import/export from browsers: Good 
  • Data import/migration: Available 
  • 2FA: Supported 
  • Filling web forms: Supported 
  • Secure sharing: Not Supported 
  • Offline storage: Available 
  • Price: Fair 
  • Pros: Great sharing options, offline storage. 
  • Cons: Some options are still in beta, no direct digital legacy support, and some features require paid plan. 

IronVest stands out as a good product offering robust data protection features. However, like many software products, it does have its drawbacks. Notably, it lacks a password-sharing feature and doesn't offer a digital legacy option. Sharing data is limited to manual methods such as printouts or screenshots, and customer support options are somewhat limited. If you need extra features like facial recognition and masked emails in a password manager, IronVest is worth considering. However, if you are searching for all-around password protection with solid sharing features available on a large variety of platforms, you should consider some other options on the market. 

Top Free Services 

Google Passwords 

Platforms supported: Android, Chrome browser 

Import/export from browsers: Good 

Data import/migration: Limited 

2FA: Supported 

Filling web forms: Good 

Secure sharing: Not available 

Offline storage: Not available 

Pros: Seamless integration with Google services. 

Cons: Limited platform support, no secure sharing or offline storage. 

Google's password manager offers both advantages and disadvantages. On the positive side, integration with the Google ecosystem is a significant benefit, making it seamless and convenient for users already using Google services. The platform provides easy access across devices and offers strong security measures, including two-factor authentication. Additionally, Google's password manager can generate and store complex passwords, enhancing overall security. However, concerns about privacy and data security may deter some users, as Google's business model revolves around collecting and utilizing user data for targeted advertising. Furthermore, the interface and features are relatively basic compared to dedicated password management tools, lacking some advanced functionalities that power users may seek.  

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Platforms supported: iPhone, Mac 

Import/export from browsers: Good 

Data import/migration: Limited 

2FA: Supported 

Filling web forms: Good 

Secure sharing: Not available 

Offline storage: Supported 

Pros: Integrated into Apple's ecosystem. 

Cons: Only for Apple devices. 

Apple Keychain, the password manager integrated into Apple's ecosystem, comes with notable benefits and drawbacks. On the positive side, seamless integration across Apple devices is a significant advantage, allowing users to effortlessly sync and access their passwords across iPhones, iPads, and Macs. The platform prioritizes privacy and security, utilizing end-to-end encryption and local Vault for passwords. Its autofill feature is efficient and user-friendly, streamlining login processes. However, the major drawback lies in its exclusivity to Apple devices, limiting its accessibility for users outside of the Apple ecosystem. Additionally, its feature set is relatively basic compared to standalone password managers, lacking some advanced functionalities that power users might desire.   

Platforms supported: Windows, Mac, with third-party apps for iPhone, Android 

Import/export from browsers: Good 

Data import/migration: Available 

2FA: Not supported directly. 

Filling web forms: Supported 

Secure sharing: Not available 

Offline storage: Supported 

Pros: Open-source, offline storage. 

Cons: Third-party apps needed for mobile, no 2FA. 

KeePass is a popular open-source password manager with its own set of advantages and disadvantages. One of its major strengths is its robust security, as KeePass allows users to control their own encryption keys and keep the password database locally stored or on their preferred cloud service. It's highly customizable and offers a wide array of plugins and extensions to tailor the experience to individual needs. However, this level of customization and the user interface may be overwhelming for less tech-savvy users. Unlike some other password managers, KeePass requires manual setup and maintenance, lacking the seamless cloud synchronization of some more user-friendly options.   

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Platforms supported: iPhone, web 

Import/export from browsers: Not supported 

Data import/migration: Not available 

2FA: Supported 

Filling web forms: Not supported 

Secure sharing: Not available 

Offline storage: Available 

Pros: Secure algorithm, offline storage. 

Cons: Limited features, no import/export capabilities. 

Spectre is just one of the ways you can attempt to keep your passwords safe and out of the hands of criminals. It is a distinctive password manager that diverges from the traditional model of storing passwords. Instead, it algorithmically generates passwords on-the-fly based on a user's unique master password and the website or service for which a password is needed. Among its advantages, the Spectre app enhances security by not actually storing any passwords in a database, which means there's nothing to be hacked or leaked. Additionally, its deterministic generation ensures that users can retrieve their passwords from any device without needing to sync databases. However, on the flip side, its unique approach may be challenging for some users to get accustomed to, especially those used to traditional password managers with stored databases. Furthermore, if a user forgets their master password, there's no way to recover their generated passwords, which can lead to significant inconveniences. 

GoPass 

Platforms supported: Windows, Mac, Linux 

Import/export from browsers: Supported 

Data import/migration: Available 

2FA: Available 

Filling web forms: Supported 

Secure sharing: Not Available 

Offline storage: Supported 

Pros: Multi-platform, offline storage. 

Cons: Slight learning curve for beginners. 

GoPass could be the way and the tool you need to keep your passwords safe. Though it can be considered pretty secure, it is completely impossible to use for a not tech-savvy user. If you are searching for a complete tool that offers a variety of features and has a dedicated app, the best practice is to find some popular solutions available in the App Store or Play Market.  

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Do security experts recommend password managers? 

Yes, most security experts recommend using password managers. They consider it safer to use a reputable password manager than trying to remember all passwords or worse, using the same password everywhere. While no system is 100% invulnerable, the encryption and security measures employed by leading password managers are typically far superior to alternative methods. 

FAQ: 

Q: How do you create a good master password? 

Creating a strong master password involves using a unique and complex combination of letters, numbers, and symbols. Aim for a minimum length of 12 characters, avoiding easily guessable information like birthdays or common phrases. Incorporate a mix of uppercase and lowercase letters, numbers, and special characters to enhance security. Avoid using dictionary words or easily accessible personal information. 

Q: When should you not use a password manager? 

Avoid using a password manager if you have concerns about their security or if you have trouble trusting third-party applications with your sensitive data. Additionally, if you are proficient at creating and remembering complex passwords for all your accounts without reusing them, you might opt not to use a password manager. Finally, individuals who prefer offline methods or have limited access to technology might find a password manager impractical. 

Q: Should I really use a password manager? 

Yes, using a password manager is highly recommended. It helps in generating and storing complex, unique passwords for each of your accounts, enhancing overall security. With the convenience of auto-fill and the ability to access passwords across various devices, a password manager saves time and promotes strong security practices. It also mitigates the risk of using weak or easily guessable passwords, ultimately bolstering your online safety. 

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