December 02, 2020
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'States Should Consider Home Delivery Or Indirect Sale Of Liquor,' Says Supreme Court

The apex court was hearing a petition that challenged the opening of liquor shops during the nationwide lockdown.

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'States Should Consider Home Delivery Or Indirect Sale Of Liquor,' Says Supreme Court
A customer carries alcohol after purchasing from a wine shop, during the ongoing COVID-19 nationwide lockdown, at Kaushambi in Ghaziabad.
Suresh K. Pandey/Outlook
'States Should Consider Home Delivery Or Indirect Sale Of Liquor,' Says Supreme Court
outlookindia.com
2020-05-08T14:23:29+05:30

States should consider home delivery or indirect sale of liquor to maintain social distancing protocols at alcohol shops during the nationwide lockdown, the Supreme Court observed on Friday.

The apex court was hearing a petition that challenged the opening of liquor shops and sought issuing of directions to declare direct-contact sales of alcoholic liquors at shops during the lockdown period as unconstitutional, null and void, Live Law reported

A three-judge bench of justices Ashok Bhushan, Sanjay Kishan Kaul and BR Gavai heard the case through video-conferencing.

"We will not pass any order but states should consider home delivery or indirect sale of liquor to maintain social distancing," the three-judge bench said.

Advocate Sai Deepak, appearing on behalf of the petitioner, had said that social distancing was not being maintained at liquor shops. "The number of shops is very less and the number of those who want it (liquor) is very large," he said.

"MHA must make clarifications in this regard, life of the common man must not get affected," the advocate submitted before the bench. 


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