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After Ranveer Singh's '83' Debacle, Here Are 10 Films That Met A Similar Fate

Despite having a stellar cast and an intriguing storyline, '83' failed to leave its mark at the box office. Covid and competition from other films were the reasons reported for its failure.

After Ranveer Singh's '83' Debacle, Here Are 10 Films That Met A Similar Fate
Top 10 films that didn't do well at box office. Instagram

Recently actor Ranveer Singh starrer '83' made its way to cinema halls; despite having a decent hype for the past couple of months, the film bombed at the box office. Reports suggest Covid and competition from other films were the reason behind the film's underperformance.

'83' is directed by Kabir Khan, and in every aspect, it is a big-budget film that stars numerous actors, including prominent names such as Deepika Padukone and Pankaj Tripathi. The film also received a decent review from critics. Despite having all the arsenal that a film demands to do well at the box office, '83' suffered a terrible fate.

The big-budget film could only manage a shade over Rs 100 crore at the box office. Amid the rising Covid cases in the country and the omicron scare, '83' that chronicled India’s historic win at the Cricket World Cup, lost at the box office. '83's producers are expected to lose roughly 80 crore due to its enormous 200 crore expenditure.

Similarly, another film that was released in 2012 is gathering significant attention from fans. For some time now, Hollywood actor Andrew Garfield's film 'The Amazing Spider-Man' has been trending on Twitter. 

After watching Garfield in 'Spider-man: No Way Home,' desperation among fans to see the actor back on big screen as the web-slinger is rising. Fans are spamming tweets, requesting makers to release a third part of the film 'The Amazing Spider-Man.' 

Here are some of the Tweets by fans:

While on the subject of films that carried great potential but failed to leave their mark and got judged too early, let's take a look at other films that were released in Bollywood and Hollywood and were not received that well by the viewers at that time:

'Children of men' (2006)

Clive Owen's starrer 'Children of Men' was released in the year 2006, and the film featured a gripping storyline and decent performances by the actors. While Alfonso Cuarón's dystopian thriller is now widely regarded as one of the finest films of the twenty-first century, it failed to recoup its investment at the box office when it was released.

The film is set in 2027, when a slew of natural disasters, wars, and terrorist attacks have turned most of the planet ungoverned, uninhabitable, or anarchic. Britain is a sliver of relative order, kept in check by a ruthless police state. It has been 18 years since a human kid has been born on Earth.

'Guide' (1965)


'Guide,' which was released on February 6, 1965, was far ahead of its time since it dealt with infidelity and the goals of a married lady at a time when Hindi films were mostly about love and living happily ever after.

A film featuring Dev Anand and Waheeda Rehman, and directed by Vijay Anand, couldn't be anything but perfect but failed to leave its mark on the box office collections. The essence of 'Guide,' on the other hand, resides in its protagonists' flaws. The protagonist is not idealistic, but manipulative, and the lady loses interest in her spouse. 'Guide' is a path-breaking work and a daring endeavour in Indian film because of its innovative approach to relationships and human behaviour.

'Fight Club' (1999)

'Fight Club,' directed by David Fincher and starring Brad Pitt, Edward Norton, and Helena Bonham Carter, was released in 1999. It is based on Chuck Palahniuk's 1996 novel of the same name. 'Fight Club' failed to fulfil the studio's box office predictions and earned mixed reviews from critics.

It's been almost two decades since its release on the big screen. Both the book and the film are considered cult classics. 'Fight Club's premise is considered by fans much ahead of its time, and its blatant anti-consumerism message resonated with dissatisfied Americans in the aftermath of 9/11. The movie also brought in a new era of filmmaking and storytelling. 

'Black Friday' (2007)

This Anurag Kashyap film, based on the 1993 Mumbai bombings, was so divisive that it took three years for the Censor Board to certify it. It was ultimately released in 2007 when the Supreme Court granted permission following the TADA court's decision in the 1993 Bombay bomb case.

The film has been praised for its fantastic performances, brutal honesty in its storyline, and guerrilla filmmaking approach, the film is based on Hussain Zaidi's book Black Friday: The True Story of the Bombay Bomb Blasts. 'Black Friday' is an excellent example of how to strike a balance between realism and entertaining entertainment. The film is presently streaming on Netflix.

'Hugo' (2011)


Filmmaker Martin Scorsese’s charming family film 'Hugo' was a commercial failure, grossing just $185m against its $150–170m budget. 'Hugo' is a fascinating and thrilling film that serves as a fictional history lesson disguised as a detective thriller. The film offers a powerful defence of cinema as a fantasy realm, a counterbalance to the brutalising reality we witness all around us. 

Hugo Cabret (Asa Butterfield), orphaned and alone except for his uncle, lives in the walls of a train station in 1930s Paris. Hugo's duty is to oil and repair the station's clocks, but he considers protecting a broken automaton and journal entrusted to him by his late father (Jude Law) to be more essential. Hugo sets off on a mission to discover the mystery of the automaton and find a place to call home, accompanied by the goddaughter (Chlo Grace Moretz) of an enraged toy dealer (Ben Kingsley).

'Andaaz Apna Apna' (1994)

'Andaz Apna Apna' directed by Rajkumar Santoshi was said to have done well in Mumbai, but in other regions and territories, it flopped even though it had two major stars like Salman Khan who had a blockbuster hit 'Maine Pyaar Kiya' to his name and Aamir Khan who too had successful films like 'Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak' and 'Dil' to his credit.

The film 'Andaz Apna Apna' tells the narrative of Amar and Prem, two middle-class brothers who strive for Raveena Tandon, the daughter of a millionaire. They meet a local thug named Teja along the road, who flips their life upside down. The film is quite popular among the masses fr its comic elements and is often termed a classic.

Enemy (2013)

Denis Villeneuve directed the psychological drama film 'Enemy' in 2013. Jake Gyllenhaal plays two individuals who are physically identical but have quite different personalities in the film. The film's budget was $200 million, however it only made $90 million domestically.

The plot revolves around Adam Bell, a gloomy, untidy history professor who appears uninterested in even his beautiful fiancee, Mary. Adam discovers his doppelganger, a bit-part actor named Anthony Clair, while watching a movie on the advice of a coworker, and resolves to seek him down. When the two men meet, their lives become strangely and irreversibly entwined.

Manto (2018)

'Manto' is a Hindi-language drama film from India. Nawazuddin Siddiqui, Rasika Duggal, Rishi Kapoor, Swara Bhaskar, Ranveer Shorey, Paresh Rawal, and Swanand Kirkire star in the film, which is directed by Nandita Das. On September 21, 2018, 'Manto' was released in theatres. The film was a flop after grossing just 3.71 crores INR.

'Manto' is a film that chronicles the most turbulent four years of Saadat Hasan Manto's life, as well as the lives of the two nations in which he lives — India and Pakistan. 'Manto' and his stories are extensively read and accepted in Bombay's seedy-shiny film industry. However, when the country is engulfed in sectarian warfare, Manto is forced to leave his beloved Bombay. He is devoid of acquaintances in Lahore and unable to find takers for his work. His increasing alcoholism leads him into a downward spiral.

The Lone Ranger (2013)

After appointing Gore Verbinski, the filmmaker of the 'Pirates of the Caribbean' trilogy, as its director in 2010, Disney's 'The Lone Ranger' had most of the elements in place to become a smash. Naturally, things did not go as planned, and the movie failed at the box office three years later, losing as much as $160-190 million.

In a sideshow circus tent in 1933, a little kid discovers an old Native American. Tonto (Johnny Depp) is an old friend of John Reid (Armie Hammer), a lawman who is better known as the Lone Ranger. Tonto remembers the day in 1869 when he first met the man who would become his trusted buddy and speaks of their collaboration in taking down Butch Cavendish (William Fichtner) and other Old West bandits, using this chance to set the record straight regarding his and Reid's escapades.

Shahid (2013)


'Shahid' was made on a production budget of ₹6.5 million (US$86,000) and filmed in complete secrecy. The film was directed by Hansal Mehta and ultimately failed to cover its making cost.

'Shahid' is a biographical film based on the life of Shahid Azmi, an attorney and human rights campaigner. The film focuses on two important cases handled by the lawyer: the 2006 Mumbai train bombings and the 2008 Mumbai attacks. At the 61st National Film Awards presentation, this film received the National Film Award for Best Actor (Rajkummar Rao) and Best Director (Hansal Mehta).

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