Sunday 28 August 2016
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DEATH IS AN OCCUPATIONAL HAZARD
Cover Story

Notes From The Underground

The lowest rung in the social order comes with a matching netherworld symbolism

Interview
A crusader for Dalit rights, Bezwada Wilson, on relcaiming for the Dalits a life of human dignity in a structurally apathetic society.
Uttam Sengupta Interviews Bezwada Wilson
Cover Story
As the BJP applies surface remedies in the face of Dalit anger, disaffection stalks its Dalit leaders
Bula Devi
Cover Story
Would you want your child to grow up inside a toilet? For manual scavengers, the sewer life is all-pervasive.
Pragya Singh
COVER STORY
A Dalit finds his riches are only skin-deep. It’s Politics.
S.P. Sharma
Opinion

Ethical Cleansing Of India

Since Ambedkar’s revolutionary legislations, a series of laws has forced caste society to face up to its own tacit comfort with slavery

Raja Sekhar Vundru
Conversation: Two feminists critique the new rape law
Feminist lawyer Flavia Agnes, on the implications of the new rape law, especially in the context of the Mahmood Farooqui rape case
Natasha Badhwar Interviews Flavia Agnes
Opinion
The Agra rally: travels through a political landscape
Sunil Menon
Orissa
A tale of four suicides, an ailing maharaja and property worth over Rs 500 crore in one of India’s poorest regions
Rakesh Dixit
 
Mumbai
Breaking the Dahi Handi may be a prized tradition, but the ‘sport’ has ruined many lives
Prachi Pinglay-Plumber
THE LATEST ISSUE
Hype, spin and politics of punditryThe media avalanche around top-level changes in the Reserve Bank doesn’t seem to be ending anytime soon. Watch out for the blinding photo-op on September 4, when Raghuram Rajan yields way to Urjit Patel.
DIPLOMACY
With more regional players commenting on Balochistan, Modi’s reference gets more ballast
Pranay Sharma
Opinion
Modi did the Baloch no good with his thank yous. Silencing their dissent will now be even easier with the ‘Indian agent’ tag.
Hamid Mir
 
A Sum-Up
‘The Rio Games is a grand success’, trumpet a few. A divided country begs to differ.
Shobhan Saxena
RBI
Urjit Patel is the name after Raghuram Rajan. Continuity is the word.
Lola Nayar
Uber/Ola
The taxi market was revolutionised...also monopolised. The government says no more.
Arushi Bedi
REGULAR
LAST PAGE
It’s in the sun and sand of Australia's red centre desert that I discover the country’s spiritual heart.
Neena Bhandari
Verse
The title poem of Perumal Murugan’s new book of 200 poems, Oru Kozhaiyin Paadalkal
 
Kerala
The great Kamala Das lived life her way. Now, an article about her personal life and conversion has created an uproar.
Minu Ittyipe
Review
The dark world Harry & Co inhabit changes little after 22 years
Anjana Basu
Review
These pacy thrillers put two southern cities on the crime map
RANA NAYAR ON GURDIAL SINGH
Profile
P. Gopichand’s obsession with badminton is at the root of his academy emerging as a centre of excellence
Qaiser Mohammad Ali On Pullela Gopichand
The Insider
A regular column on the essential buzz
Uttam Sengupta, Dola Mitra, Prarthna Gahilote, Ajay Sukumaran
Essay
Fifty years. Adoor. A quiet opus where, into tight frames of the ordinary, there seeps in depth, and the universal verities: time, place, power, morality.
C.S. Venkiteswaran
The Reviews
From absurd to intense and subtle to solid, the performance rides different waves.
Prachi Pinglay-Plumber
The Reviews
In Babu Bangaram, the tale unfurls with some twi­sts. But an interesting story is stretched too far.
Madhavi Tata
10 QUESTIONS
The music composer duo Sachin Sanghvi and Jigar Saraiya on their cover for Animal Planet’s Yeh Mera India, and living the lyrical life.
Stuti Agarwal Interviews Sachin-Jigar
OUTLOOK ARCHIVE
ISSUE DATED | JUNE 03, 2013
REVIEW
An honourable Svengali and his Mujib-speaking protege ply their trade in liberated Bangladesh. Imam weaves a hyper-realistic tale of tragedy, farce, idealism and power.
 
Outlook in Rewind
10 Years Ago
With growing awareness of the extent of contamination of our everyday foods, organic foods are being looked at with new respect. The number of retail outlets that stock such foodstuffs has multiplied, and their sales have increased. The irony, as organic food outlets can’t stop reminding us, is that commercial farmers who use pesticides and fertilisers for their produce have always kept a small acreage free of such substances to grow food for their own consumption. Thus, much of rural India, by default, consumes organic food.
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