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Sunday, Nov 28, 2021
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Valley Of Dams

A flurry of big power projects in the Chenab valley in Jammu has the residents and activists worried about the environmental impact on the region's fragile ecology.

Valley Of Dams
Photograph by Umer Asif
Valley Of Dams
outlookindia.com
2021-02-05T16:32:49+05:30

There’s alarm among residents of Jammu’s Chenab valley, where work on a number of major hydropower projects have picked up pace since the abrogation of Article 370 on August 5, 2019. Thousands of trees have been felled during excavation work. Locals fear the projects will cause damage to biodiversity and ­trigger earthquakes in this high-risk seismic zone. On January 11, a high-­intensity earthquake rocked the Chenab valley, and the tremors were felt across J&K. The epicentre was in Kishtwar district. “With some of India’s biggest power projects and dams being built along a 70-km stretch cutting across Kishtwar and Doda ­districts, we have become the world’s biggest water laboratory,” says Kishtwar district development council (DDC) member Zakir Bhat. “The power projects are coming up at the cost of people, who forfeit their res­ources without getting anything from the government. We should be part of all decision-making about how to harness this region’s water resources.”

A major tributary of the Indus, the Chenab flows into Kishtwar from Himachal Pradesh, and runs through four other J&K districts before entering Pakistan. Under the Indus Waters Treaty facilitated by the World Bank in 1960, India controls the Beas, the Ravi and the Sutlej, besides being allowed to use up to 20 per cent of the water of the Indus, the Jhelum and the Chenab for irrigation, transport and power generation. Article 370’s abrogation was ­followed by a major push for maximum exploitation of the three Pakistan-controlled rivers, with the Centre ­deciding to expedite work on the 1,000 MW Pakal Dul, 624 MW Kiru and 540 MW Kwar power projects in the Chenab valley. There are plans to begin work on the 550 MW phase-II of the Dul Hasti project. On January 20, the Union ­cabinet approved an investment of Rs 5,281.94 crore for the 850 MW Ratle ­hydroelectric project on the Chenab in Kishtwar. “Jammu and Kashmir will be benefited by getting free power worth Rs 5,289 crore and through the levy of water usage charges worth Rs 9,581 crore from Ratle hydroelectric project, during the project life cycle of 40 years,” reads an official communique.

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