Bagh, located on the banks of the river Baghini, is a village best known for its caves and textiles. It is home to the traditional form of block printing on fabric, known as Bagh printing. This small town boasts several national award-winning craftsmen.

These photographs were taken in the workshop, Bagh Prints, run by the award-winning Khatri family. The Khatris moved to Bagh more than five decades ago. They are responsible for keeping the craft alive, while also developing contemporary designs. They use only natural vegetable dyes.

Visit MP Tourism

Abhinandita Mathur
Detail of a broken relief panel from Bagh Caves. The caves provide inspiration for the designs of Bagh prints
Detail of a broken relief panel from Bagh Caves. The caves provide inspiration for the designs of Bagh prints
Abhinandita Mathur
Dried harad nuts used for creating the natural yellow colour used in Bagh printing
Dried harad nuts used for creating the natural yellow colour used in Bagh printing
Abhinandita Mathur
A variety of organic and natural colours and ingredients are used in creating Bagh Prints
A variety of organic and natural colours and ingredients are used in creating Bagh Prints
Abhinandita Mathur
A printer punches a typical Bagh print flower on fabric
A printer punches a typical Bagh print flower on fabric
Abhinandita Mathur
National award winner Mohammed Yusuf Khatri at his printing unit in Bagh
National award winner Mohammed Yusuf Khatri at his printing unit in Bagh
Abhinandita Mathur
A modern print from Bagh Prints; this one was used at the Lakme Fashion Week 2017
A modern print from Bagh Prints; this one was used at the Lakme Fashion Week 2017
Abhinandita Mathur
Typical Bagh motif on a wooden block
Typical Bagh motif on a wooden block
Abhinandita Mathur
A bud of the morinda tinctoria plant, commonly known as aal or Indian mulberry, whose root bark is used for creating natural colours
A bud of the morinda tinctoria plant, commonly known as aal or Indian mulberry, whose root bark is used for creating natural colours