LIVE : Outlook Speakout Awards Click Here!
LIVE : Outlook Speakout Awards


Sachin's Biopic Celebrates The Cricketer But Fails To Answer All Questions

The film is a big dose of the tumultuous‘90s era in Indian cricket – an era when the BCCI became a super power in world cricket, when match fixing loomed large over cricket, a period that witnessed the battle between Sachin and Azharuddin, players and advertisers.
Sachin's Biopic Celebrates The Cricketer But Fails To Answer All Questions
Sachin's Biopic Celebrates The Cricketer But Fails To Answer All Questions
outlookindia.com
2017-05-26T22:07:37+0530

Film: Sachin: A Billion Dreams

Cast: Sachin Tendulkar, Arjun Tendulkar, Mayuresh Pem, Mahendra Singh Dhoni, Anjali Tendulkar, Virender Sehwag, Sara Tendulkar

Director: James Erskine

Rating: 3.5/5

 

In a nation where “cricket is religion, and Sachin is god”, it is only reasonable to ask if a film on the legend will deliver anything about him that is not already known by the aficionados, and if it will engage the smaller section of the audience that are not fans of him or the game. James Erskine's docu-drama, Sachin: A Billion Dreams, checks both. The biopic of Sachin Tendulkar gives us exactly what it promises: a glorious portrait of the cricket star – 22 yards, 24 years, and the billion dreams, hopes and aspirations connected with it.

Advertisement opens in new window

 

The film is a big dose of the tumultuous‘90s era in Indian cricket – an era when the BCCI became a super power in world cricket, when match fixing loomed large over cricket, a period that witnessed the battle between Sachin and Azharuddin, players and advertisers. It was the time of arrival of small town heroes Sourav Ganguly and MS Dhoni, and the Greg Chappell episode.

 

It is not a definitive portrait in answering all the questions around the time of the star, but does celebrate the master blaster’s long career, humility and rooted approach to life as a middle class boy fighting for his dreams.You get to see the early life of Sachin Tendulkar and his passion for cricket, and how his brother Ajit Tendulkar realized his latent potential. His coach Ramakant Achrekar, facing Waqar Younis’s whispering bouncers for the first time, injuries, TV commercials, and of course the ground sequences. But we have seen all this. The moments that make the film are ones where we see the star player more intimately - the ones Tendulkar shares with his parents and elder brother, his demanding coach, his wife and children, the letting go time with his friends.

 

Advertisement opens in new window

But before we get too comfortable, the movie is back to being the reverential docu-drama that it is meant to be. It cannot go unnoticed that the biopic is in fact ‘authorised’. It has clearly been umpired by Sachin himself: the choice of what is personal and public has been carefully sifted. There is little but a glance into the ego battle between Sachin and Azharuddin, the Chappell dynamics, the controversy over Sachin’s captaincy, and the ugly aspects of the game, especially when the match-fixing scandal broke. But the real-time glimpses of the team celebrating Sachin’s 35th century, the star in training with his son, Arjun, a vulnerable confession when losing his captaincy, are reasons enough to watch the film.

 

Erskine takes all-too familiar material and makes of it an engrossing film. It glides seamlessly from one big-ticket event in Sachin’s life to another – his first bat, coaching under Achrekar, meeting his wife Anjali, his first newborn, and the second, his captainship, the big losses, and the bigger wins. The back-and-forth between Tendulkar's phenomenal childhood-till-retirement career path andthe present dayis effortlessly executed by Erskine and editor Avdhesh Mohla, to the charming soundtrack by A.R. Rahman which is one of the many takeaways from the film. Through the family and actors, we meet the gifted child who, with the unwavering support of his family, Achrekar's no-nonsense training, his own diligence and passion, became the giant we know him to be. As a film that should have unapologetically pandered to the fans, Sachin: A Billion Dreams manages to hold the attention of someone who has not been a fan of the game or the man himself, and even leave them a little teary with Sachin’s farewell speech end.

Advertisement opens in new window

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next Story : Remembering Super Cop K.P.S. Gill: The Man Who Ruled Indian Hockey With An Iron Fist
Download the Outlook ​Magazines App. Six magazines, wherever you go! Play Store and App Store

Post a Comment

You are not logged in, please Log in or Register
THE LATEST ISSUE
CLICK IMAGE FOR CONTENTS
REVIEW
Review
In today’s maelstrom of unregulated content, propaganda finds a natural disguise. Stanley’s important research looks at its well-oiled inner workings.
MAGAZINE August 03, 2017
Review
The first Dalit novel in Oriya is also a clash of generational views—education and radical action as an armature and counter to prejudice
MAGAZINE August 03, 2017
Review
There is a new surge in the blood-soaked period we call Partition. A new novel plays to stereotypes, but captures the confused terror and panic well.
MAGAZINE July 27, 2017
Review
Amid a young Indian’s notches on his American bedposts and flashes of life back in Bihar, Amitava Kumar floods his novel with studious ephemera
MAGAZINE July 27, 2017
Review
Pattanaik takes each verse of the Hanuman Chalisa, unpacks it, then brilliantly links it to other stories and ideas across the vast sea of Hinduism
MAGAZINE July 27, 2017
read more>>>
Advertisement

OUTLOOK TOPICS :

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

or just type initial letters