PHOTO FEATURE
How Caged Birds Sing
Holding fast to their beliefs, gaols didn’t daunt, death nor defamation deterred them. We recall them thus.
  • Made Of A Different Clay
    Aug 11, 2017

    Made Of A Different Clay

    When someone is unbelievably cocky, unbelievably talented, with the steel of idealism running down his spine, all the state can do is wring its manacled hands. Mohammad Ali struts def­iant in New York in 1970 with the Black Panthers—he was handed five years for ‘dodging’ the Vietnam draft, stri­pped of his heavyweight title. Look into his eyes to see if he cares.
    Photograph by Getty Images
  • Before Robben Island
    Aug 11, 2017

    Before Robben Island

    Adoption of the Freedom Charter by the ANC meant ‘treason’ for S. Africa’s apa­rtheid state. Nelson Mandela (third from right, seen here at the trial in Joha­nn­esburg in 1956) and others were jai­led, but later acquitted. The tallest of terms awaited him. He’d remain unbroken.
    Photograph by Getty Images
  • A Stand Still Potent
    Aug 11, 2017

    A Stand Still Potent

    Once upon a time, politics used to burst upon the niceties of Olympics. In 1968 in Mexico City, the 200m victory ceremony saw US athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their gloved hands in Black salutes, ignoring anthem and flag. For Dr. King was killed in April that year, and no hope was in sight.
    Photograph by Getty Images
  • The Bell Tolled Thus
    Aug 11, 2017

    The Bell Tolled Thus

    ‘Quit India’—the pithy urgency of that call to action by Gandhiji—exa­ctly 75 years ago—galv­anised Indians as never before. Even as the top leadership was put in jail, the und­­­e­­terred mas­ses fearlessly confronted the pol­­ice, as in this picture from Bom­­bay. As the Right, on both sides of the religi­ous divide, were jockeying for posi­tions in the Vice­­roy’s Council, Indians fought on.
    Photograph by Getty Images
  • Freedom Song From Every Molehill
    Aug 11, 2017

    Freedom Song From Every Molehill

    America’s homilies about injustice are legion, but the deaths of Philando Castile, Michael Brown and hundreds of other una­rmed Black persons show many of the dreams of Martin Luther King—unforgettable in a style honed at the pulpit—del­ivered that August day at the Lincoln Memorial remains unrealised. Yes, and how many deaths will it take....
    Photograph by Getty Images
  • This Life Of Toil
    Aug 11, 2017

    This Life Of Toil

    Modern India was ten in 1957, and fighting a thick enc­rustation of socio-­economic evil to break thr­ough into a new age. Meh­b­oob Khan’s Mot­her India metaphorised the bone-­cru­shing str­­­­­uggle in our villages in the indomitable person of Radha. Epic in scope, powered by a car­eer-cha­n­ging perfor­­m­ance by Nargis and Sunil Dutt, this is one of our national movies.
  • China’s Greatest Hero
    Aug 11, 2017

    China’s Greatest Hero

    A lone protester stalling a troop of tanks in Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989: is this late 20th century’s most defiant act of idealism? Beijing’s students asked for free speech and press and accountability from their one party. Their Communist fathers gave them bullets. Put all of China’s economic progress and global clout on a scale. Now put the ‘tank man’ on another. Which one weighs more?
    Photograph by AP
  • Since 1969...
    Aug 11, 2017

    Since 1969...

    Music sings of Utopia. At Woodstock, that impossible ideal was realised, if fleetingly. For four August days 48 years back, 5,00,000 fans chewed up the turf in New York state, waking up to The Who, having Jefferson Airplane for brekka, CSNY for lunch and the Grateful Dead for dinner. Smoke from pot raised a purple haze, rain created slush, Ravi Shankar played.... Twas for peace and music, but at the height of ’Nam, it marked a generation.
    Photograph by Getty Images
  • Death For The Ballot
    Aug 11, 2017

    Death For The Ballot

    We are lucky; we got universal adult suffrage along with ind­ependence. But half of Britons—womenfolk—had to wait till 1921. The struggle was tough and bloody, and suffragists like Emmeline Pankhurst had to face a brutish state. The militant Emily Wilding Davison chose a dramatic martyrdom—throwing herself in front of a racing horse at the Epsom Derby on June 4, 1913. Her epitaph? “Deeds not Words”.
    Photograph by Getty Images
  • A Small Step For Mankind
    Aug 11, 2017

    A Small Step For Mankind

    Even after America’s Great Emancipation in 1865, political expediency and a cunning system of Jim Crow laws meant half the country was cruelly segregated and criminally treated. Schools were des­­eg­­regated in 1954, but nobody confronted the South’s wolfish vigilantism. In 1960, Ruby Bridges, 6, atte­n­ded a white-only elementary school in New Orle­ans. Well protected by marshals and police to keep at bay a howling pack, her courage moved the world. It was a signal moment in the Civil Rights Movement.
    Photograph by AP
Slides
Advertisement

OUTLOOK TOPICS :

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

or just type initial letters