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Gabriel Garcia Marquez (1927-2014)

Gabriel García Márquez, 87, the Colombian Nobel laureate, whose One Hundred Years of Solitude established him as a giant of 20th-century literature, died at his home in Mexico City.

November 30, -0001

Gabriel García Márquez, 87, the Colombian Nobel laureate, whose One Hundred Years of Solitude established him as a giant of 20th-century literature, died at his home in Mexico City.

Miguel Tovar/Associated Press

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1982 was awarded to Gabriel García Márquez "for his novels and short stories, in which the fantastic and the realistic are combined in a richly composed world of imagination, reflecting a continent's life and conflicts".

AP Photo/Hamilton, File

At the Nobel Prize ceremony in 1982. In 1981, he told the Paris Review, "I was asked the other day if I would be interested in the Nobel Prize, but I think that for me it would be an absolute catastrophe. I would certainly be interested in deserving it, but to receive it would be terrible. It would just complicate even more the problems of fame. The only thing I really regret in life is not having a daughter."

AP

Queen Silvia and King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden pose with Gabriel García Márquez (second from left) and his family at the Nobel Banquet in the Stockholm City Hall, Sweden, on 10 December 1982. Copyright © Svensk Reportagetjänst 1983

Ulf Blumenberg

In this Oct. 20,1995 file photo, PLO Leader Yasser Arafat greets Nobel laureate Colombian Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez during the closing ceremonies of the Non-Aligned Summit in Cartagena, Colombia. How did you start writing? The Paris Review asked him in 1981. "By drawing. By drawing cartoons. Before I could read or write I used to draw comics at school and at home. The funny thing is that I now realize that when I was in high school I had the reputation of being a writer, though I never in fact wrote anything. If there was a pamphlet to be written or a letter of petition, I was the one to do it because I was supposedly the writer."

AP Poto/Roger Richards,File

Marquez remained an unswerving supporter of Fidel Castro, who became such a close friend that drafts of his unpublished books were sometimes first shown to the Cuban leader. "Fidel is a very cultured man," he said in an interview. "When we're together we talk about literature."

Jose Goitia/Associated Press

In this Dec. 2, 2006 file photo, Cuba's acting President Raul Castro, brother of Cuban leader Fidel Castro, left, chats with Colombian Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez during a military parade in Havana, Cuba. He told the Paris Review in 1981, . When I worked for newspapers, I wasn’t very conscious of every word I wrote, whereas now I am."

AP Photo/ Javier Galeano, File

In this March 26, 2007 file photo released by Colombia's News Service SNE, former U.S. President Bill Clinton, right, speaks with Colombian Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez at the opening ceremony of International Congress of Spanish Language in Cartagena, Colombia.

(AP Photo/Cesar Carrion, SNE

Gabriel García Márquez waving to fans during the International Book Fair in Guadalajara, Mexico, in 2007. The Chilean poet and Nobel Laureate Pablo Neruda called One Hundred Years of Solitude "the greatest revelation in the Spanish language since Don Quixote", the 17th-century masterpiece by Spain's Miguel de Cervantes.

Guillermo Arias/Associated Press

Marquez, being welcomed by fans as he rode through Aracataca in a horse-drawn carriage.

William Fernando Martinez/Associated Press

Colombian Nobel Literature laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez greets fans and reporters outside his home on his 87th birthday in Mexico City, March 6, 2014.

AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo, File

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