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Taslima Nasreen

Taslima Nasrin

Photograph by Narendra Bisht

Bangladeshi physician turned author Taslima Nasreen

Photograph by Narendra Bisht

Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasreen

Narendra Bisht

Bangladeshi author Taslima Nasrin during the closing ceremony of Delhi International Film Festival.

PTI Photo

Taslima Nasreen posted a picture with her boyfriend on Twitter and it said, ''My boyfriend is 20 years younger than me. It's cool.''

Twitter

Taslima Nasreen

Narendra Bisht

Taslima Nasreen

Narendra Bisht

Love To Give Amidst that uncompromising fog of fervour and furore about Taslima Nasreen’s poetry, it’s forgotten that her plume coaxed Cry from sax genius Steve Lacy. Mujhe Dena Aur Prem, her first Hindi collection, likely won’t hit a note as high.

Tribhuvan Tiwari

Fans of Bangladeshi author Taslima Nasrin demonstrate in Kolkata.

PTI Photo

Sandeep Adhwaryu

Sandeep Adhwaryu

Lajja author Taslima Nasreen

AFP (From Outlook, March 15)

A controversial article on the burqa by Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin, led to protests and riots in Karnataka chief minister B.S. Yediyurappa’s hometown, Shimoga, killing two people. While one died in police firing, the other succumbed to injuries sustained in stone-pelting in hospital. A 1500-strong crowd took out a procession to express their anger over the article titled Purdah hai purdah that appeared in the weekly magazine section, Saptahika Prabha of the Kannada daily Kannada Prabha of the New Indian Express group. As per the newspaper, it was translated from the original English by “Sindhu”.

KPN

A controversial article on the burqa by Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin, led to protests and riots in Karnataka chief minister B.S. Yediyurappa’s hometown, Shimoga, killing two people. While one died in police firing, the other succumbed to injuries sustained in stone-pelting in hospital. A 1500-strong crowd took out a procession to express their anger over the article titled Purdah hai purdah that appeared in the weekly magazine section, Saptahika Prabha of the Kannada daily Kannada Prabha of the New Indian Express group. As per the newspaper, it was translated from the original English by “Sindhu”.

KPN

A controversial article on the burqa by Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin, led to protests and riots in Karnataka chief minister B.S. Yediyurappa’s hometown, Shimoga, killing two people. While one died in police firing, the other succumbed to injuries sustained in stone-pelting in hospital. A 1500-strong crowd took out a procession to express their anger over the article titledPurdah hai purdah that appeared in the weekly magazine section, Saptahika Prabha of the Kannada daily Kannada Prabha of the New Indian Express group. As per the newspaper, it was translated from the original English by “Sindhu”.

KPN

A controversial article on the burqa by Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin, led to protests and riots in Karnataka chief minister B.S. Yediyurappa’s hometown, Shimoga, killing two people. While one died in police firing, the other succumbed to injuries sustained in stone-pelting in hospital. A 1500-strong crowd took out a procession to express their anger over the article titled Purdah hai purdah that appeared in the weekly magazine section, Saptahika Prabha of the Kannada daily Kannada Prabha of the New Indian Express group. As per the newspaper, it was translated from the original English by “Sindhu”.

KPN

A controversial article on the burqa by Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin, led to protests and riots in Karnataka chief minister B.S. Yediyurappa’s hometown, Shimoga, killing two people. While one died in police firing, the other succumbed to injuries sustained in stone-pelting in hospital. A 1500-strong crowd took out a procession to express their anger over the article titledPurdah hai purdah that appeared in the weekly magazine section, Saptahika Prabha of the Kannada daily Kannada Prabha of the New Indian Express group. As per the newspaper, it was translated from the original English by “Sindhu”.

Activists light candles as they observe Shame Day to mark the day exiled Bangladeshi author Taslima Nasrin was forced to flee her Calcutta home after violent protests last year. Nasrin left Bangladesh in 1994 after Islamic extremists accused her of insulting Islam in her writings and threatened to kill her.

AP Photo/Bikas Das

Calcutta finally capitulated in the face of supposed 'protests from a section of intellectuals' and banned controversial Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasreen's book 'Dwikhandito' (split in two). 'A lot of people told me that Kolkata and Dhaka were ideologically the same,' Taslima reacted. 'But I had refused to believe them since for me West Bengal represented the citadel of democracy. Today I know they were right.' The CM on his part finds these discussions 'time-consuming'. 'We did our research before taking a decision. I have not only read the book but also taken opinion from at least 20 to 25 persons who matter.'

Outlook

TuesdayMembers of the All India Minority Council burn an effigy of Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin in protest against her visit to Kolkata. Nasrin arrived in the city on January 14 for the launch of her fourth autobiographical novel. The Minority Council has threatened to launch a 'militant agitation' if the Left Front government failed to issue quit notice to her as early as possible.

AP Photo / Bikas Das

28 January Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin looks at her fourth and latest autobiographical novel 'Sei Sob Aundhokaar'at the Calcutta Book Fair. Annoyed by the West Bengal government's 'indifference' to Nasreen visit despite protests, the West Bengal Minority Council threatened an agitation if she was not expelled from Kolkata immediately. Commenting on the 'fatwa' issued against her, the author said 'they have the liberty to serve fatwa, and I enjoy the right to write'.

AP Photo / Bikas Das

21 FebruaryBangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin holds a copy of a Hindi translation of her book titled 'Sei Sob Andhakar,' or 'Those Dark Days' during its release at the World Book Fair in New Delhi. The Bangladesh government banned Nasrin's latest book for allegedly containing 'grave and objectionable comments about Islam and Prophet Mohammad' that 'may casue hatred in the society'. The exiled writer termed the ban on her books as 'meaningless' and 'done at the behest of Islamic bigots.'

AP Photo/Gurinder Osan

Thursday 17 FebruaryFacing death threat from radical Islamic groups in Bangladesh, exiled Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasreen has sought Indian citizenship saying her country of origin has "slammed the doors" on her. The writer has sent a faxed letter to Home Minister Shivraj Patil requesting him she be given " Indian citizenship or residential permit whichever is possible." When asked what prompted her to seek Indian citizenship after being in exile in Europe for a decade, Nasreen said "My love for the language and the people of West Bengal is all what prompted me to apply for Indian citizenship". The writer was issued a death threat by fundamentalist outfits in Bangladesh in 1994 by for what they called blasphemous writings and had faced court case on the charge of hurting religious sentiments.

AP File

October: Taslima Nasrin was again asked by the government of India to leave the country and she quietly left for Europe on 15 October.

Friday August 8, 2008
She's back! Controversial Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasreen, who was had been bundled out from West Bengal in November 2007, and kept under confinements in Delhi -- what she described as "a chamber of death" -- before leaving for Sweden where she spent more than four months, returned back to India. When asked about her return and her whereabouts or whether he had held any talks with West Bengal Chief Minister Buddhadeb Bhattacharjee with regard to Ms. Nasreen, the external affairs minister Pranab Mukherjee said: “I have no knowledge and it is not possible for a Foreign Minister to keep track of a guest or where she will come.” Significantly, he also added, “It is the tradition of our country to give shelter to a person seeking it. But we also expect our guests not to do anything that will make problems either for the citizens or the countrymen.”. Ms Nasreen has always expressed her wish to stay on in Kolkata, but with elections approaching and the government not wanting to offend the Muslim vote bank, it would be interesting to see how the Left and the centre handle the issue of her stay. Also See: Taslima Nasreen

File Photo

Wednesday March 19, 2008
Many months back, Arundhati Roy had summed up the l'affaire Taslima Nasreen thus: "She is like a person who has now got the protection of the mafia which is the state in some way. She has nowhere to go. She has no protection. She just has to blunder her way through this kind of humiliation and I really feel for her...It is like being sentenced to good behaviour for the rest of your life which is a death sentence for a writer. If I had to live somewhere in those conditions, I would become a yoga instructor or something. I would give up writing because this is such a nasty thing to do. Here is a woman who is a Bengali writer. She can’t function outside. It’s a question of principle anyway. It is not about her, it is about us. What kind of society are we creating? Sure it’s tough to take the kind of things she said about Islam but she should be put in her place, intellectually and otherwise. Not like this where she will become a martyr to somebody else....Hers is actually the tragedy of displacement. Once, she has been displaced from her home. She has no rights. She is a guest and she is being treated very badly. She is being humiliated." Finally, on March 19, Taslima Nasreen decided that she had had enough. She upped and left. By all accounts, it would seem that she was nudged out of the country by the powers that be. Her bitter parting words? "Throughout my life I stood for the underprivileged but the government of the country which I consider as my home has infringed on my rights as a human being." Also See: Taslima Nasreen

Taslima Nasreen may have been awarded high honours by the French, but the Indian government continues to treat her like a pariah, though it was forced to extend her visa but with the rider that all "guests" should not do anything that hurts the sentiments of any community. Translation: shut the hell up. Her visa was expiring on Sunday, February 17. Nasreen has been extended an open invitation to France to receive the prestigious Simone de Beauvoir literary award for her writings, but has been banished from Kolkata where she wants to return. The photo shows renowned author Mahashweta Devi (centre) in a rally, in Kolkata, along with other intellectuals demanding that Taslima be allowed to return to the city. Also See: Taslima Nasreen

PTI Photo

Friday November 30, 2007
India Will Provide Shelter To Taslima, said the external affairs minister on behalf of his government in Lok Sabha, but added that she will have to eschew "political activities in India or any actions which may harm India's relations with friendly countries" and "will refrain from activities and expressions that may hurt the sentiments of our people". A deal had obviously been struck. The besieged author was forced to withdrew the impugned passages from her book: "I am withdrawing controversial lines in Dwikhandita, written in 2002 with the memory of Bangladesh in the 1980s when military threw out secularism in the country. I wrote the book in support of the people who defended secular values. I had no intention to hurt anybody's sentiment. Now since some people in India claim that it hurt their sentiments, I am withdrawing some lines in the book. I hope that from now on, there would be no controversy and I'll be able to live peacefully in this country. I have already asked the publisher of the book, People's Book Society, not to circulate copies of the book which are in their possession. I have asked my publisher to bring out the next edition of the book deleting those controversial lines (about Prophet Mohammed)". But the controversy raged on. Muslims burn effigy of AICC President Sonia Gandhi and Nasreen, in front of a mosque, in Patna on Friday.

PTI Photo

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