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Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai, Pakistani Nobel Peace Prize winner, poses for a photograph with Farhan Akhtar, Indian Film Director, during a media opportunity to speak to cricket legends and celebrities from each of the competing nation ahead of the Cricket World Cup opening party along The Mall in London. The opening Cricket World Cup match takes place at The Oval in London.

AP/PTI Photo

2014 Nobel Laureate Malala Yousafzai gestures during an address at the Kennedy School's Institute of Politics at Harvard University

Photo by AP/PTI

Nobel laureate Malala Yousafzai attends the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

AP/PTI

Jeans, boots and bomber jacket may be de rigueur for other Oxford students, but not for a young Nobel winner who almost gave her life for an ideal. A photo showing Mal­ala Yousafzai in such daring dress made its way to Pak­istan, where conservative, and jealous, hordes decen­ded on her to play their favourite sport: merciless trolling.

Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai, centre right, speaks with school girls in Maiduguri Nigeria. Nobel Peace laureate Malala Yousafzai was greeted with cheers by dozens of young women in northeastern Nigeria, where she spoke out for the many girls abducted under Boko Haram's deadly insurgency.

AP/PTI

Pakistani activist and Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai, right, walks through the hall of honour with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Parliament Hill, in Ottawa.

AP/PTI

Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani activist for female education and the youngest-ever Nobel Prize laureate, chats with panelists on stage at a benefit lunch for Girls Inc., a nonprofit organisation whose mission is giving confidence to girls, in Omaha, Nebraska.

AP Photo

Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai, right, from Pakistan and 17-year-old Syrian refugee Mazoun Almellehan, left, listen to other speakers during the first focus event on education at the 'Supporting Syria and the Region' conference at the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre in London. Leaders and diplomats from 70 countries are meeting in London Thursday to pledge billions to help millions of Syrians displaced by war, and try to slow the chaotic exodus of refugees to Europe.

AP Photo/Matt Dunham, Pool

Pakistani activist and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai addresses delegates during the fourth 'Thermatic Pledging Session', in London, UK.

AP/PTI

Nobel Prize winner Malala Yousafzai wipes away tears as she listens to eye witness accounts of the Taliban attack on the Army Public School in Peshawar, Pakistan.

Joe Giddens/ PA via AP

Nobel Peace Prize recipient Malala Yousafzai, 18, plays soccer with Syrian refugee children during her visit to Azraq refugee camp in Jordan. Rich countries should spend less on weapons in the Syria conflict and more on education, Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai calling world leaders "quite stingy" as she visited a camp for Syrian war refugees.

AP/PTI

Year of Saving Children The Nobel Peace awards in 2014 was a subcontinental affair. Malala’s indomitable courage in the face of reactionary terror and Satyarthi’s decades-long doggedness in the face of apathy were rewarded in this recognition of the plight of disdvantaged children across the world. May their tribe incre­ase; may their countries join hands.

PTI

Prize winners Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai, right, look at Malala's blood stained school uniform at the opening of the Nobel Peace Prize exhibition at the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo.

AP Photo: Fredrik Varfjell / NTB scanpix

Joint-Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai from Pakistan waves as she arrives to speak on stage during the Nobel Peace Prize Concert in Oslo, Norway. Malala Yousafzai from Pakistan and Kailash Satyarthi of India received the Nobel Peace Prize for risking their lives to help protect children from slavery, extremism and forced labor at great risk to their own lives.

AP Photo/ Matt Dunham

Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai, from Pakistan being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize during the award ceremony in Oslo, Norway.

AP Photo/Matt Dunham

This combo of three images captures the reaction of Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai during the Nobel Peace Prize award ceremony in Oslo, Norway.

AP Photo/Matt Dunham

A man holding the Mexican flag is led away by security after attempting to get on stage with Nobel Peace Prize winners Malala Yousafzai from Pakistan and Kailash Satyarthi of India during the Nobel Peace Prize award ceremony in Oslo, Norway.

AP Photo/ Cornelius Poppe, Scanpix

Chair of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Thorbjorn Jagland, left, intervenes as a man holding the Mexican flag approaches Nobel Peace Prize winners Malala Yousafzai from Pakistan during the Nobel Peace Prize award ceremony in Oslo, Norway.

AP Photo/ Cornelius Poppe, Scanpix

Nobel Peace Prize winners Malala Yousafzai from Pakistan and Kailash Satyarthi of India hold up their Nobel Peace Prize medals during the Nobel Peace Prize award ceremony in Oslo, Norway.

AP Photo/ Heiko Junge, NTB Scanpix

Nobel Peace Prize winners Malala Yousafzai from Pakistan and Kailash Satyarthi of India hold their Nobel Peace Prize diplomas and medals during the Nobel Peace Prize award ceremony in Oslo, Norway.

AP Photo/ Cornelius Poppe, NTB Scanpix

An image of joint Nobel Peace prize winner Malala Yousafzai, center, is displayed on a screen alongside previous winners of the prize in the Nobel Field exhibit at the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo, Norway.

AP Photo/ Matt Dunham

Joint Nobel Peace prize winner Malala Yousafzai, fourth left, stands with five young women she invited to attend the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony, as they pose for a group photograph before speaking to the media at Malala's hotel in Oslo, Norway.

AP Photo/ Matt Dunham

Joint-Nobel Peace prize winners Malala Yousafzai, left, and Kailash Satyarthi attend a press conference in Oslo, Norway.

AP Photo/ Matt Dunham

Joint-Nobel Peace prize winners Malala Yousafzai, left, and Kailash Satyarthi attend a press conference in Oslo, Norway.

AP Photo/ Matt Dunham

Joint-Nobel Peace prize winners Malala Yousafzai, foreground right, and Kailash Satyarthi, left, are ushered into a press conference by Chair of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Torbjorn Jagland, 2nd left, in Oslo, Norway.

AP Photo/ Matt Dunham

Joint-Nobel Peace prize winners Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarthi give a press conference in Oslo, Norway. The Nobel Peace Prize will be presented to and shared between the youngest Nobel Prize winner ever, 17-year-old Taliban attack survivor Malala Yousafzai and Indian children's rights activist Kailash Satyarthi in a ceremony in Oslo.

AP Photo/ Matt Dunham

The bloodied school uniform worn by one of this years Nobel Peace Prize laureates, Malala Yousafzai, when she was shot in Pakistan, is unwrapped and prepared for exhibition in Oslo. The grim garments will be shown at the Nobel Peace Centre in Oslo and will be part of an exhibition to honour present and past Nobel Peace Prize laureates as this year's prize is awarded to Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarth in the Oslo City Hall on December 10.

AP Photo/ NTB Scanpix, Torstein Boe

Children rights activist Malala Yousafzai, right, receives the World's Children's Prize from Swedish Queen Silvia, left, at Gripsholm Castle in Mariefred, Sweden.

AP Photo/ TT News Agency, Anders Wiklund

Malala Yousafzai holds up her Liberty Medal during a ceremony at the National Constitution Center, in Philadelphia. The honor is given annually to an individual who displays courage and conviction while striving to secure liberty for people worldwide.

AP Photo/ Matt Rourke

Female supporters of Pakistan People's Party cut a cake to celebrate Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai, who survived the Taliban's attack, at a ceremony in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

Combo image: Indian children's rights activist Kailash Satyarthi, left, and Malala Yousafzai, right. Satyarthi of India and Yousafzai of Pakistan jointly won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, Oct. 10, 2014, for risking their lives to fight for children's rights.

AP Photo/file

Malala Yousafzai poses with a bouquet after speaking during a media conference at the Library of Birmingham, in Birmingham, England, after she was named as winner of The Nobel Peace Prize.

AP Photo/ Rui Vieira

Malala Yousafzai, 2nd right, with mother Tor Pekai, right, brothers Khushal, 2nd left, Atal, 3rd left, and father Ziauddin, left, after speaking during a media conference at the Library of Birmingham, in Birmingham, after she was named as winner of The Nobel Peace Prize.

AP Photo/ Rui Vieira

Malala Yousafzai speaks during a media conference at the Library of Birmingham, in Birmingham, England, after she was named as winner of The Nobel Peace Prize.

AP Photo/ Rui Vieira

A Pakistani customer reads the book written by Malala Yousafzai, who survived the Taliban's attack, at a local book store in Islamabad, Pakistan. Malala of Pakistan and Kailash Satyarthi of India won the Nobel Peace Prize for risking their lives to fight for children’s rights. The decision made Malala, a 17-year-old student and education activist, the youngest-ever Nobel winner.

AP Photo/ B.K. Bangash

File combo images: Children's rights activists , from left, Kailash Satyarthi of India and Malala Yousafzai of Pakistan win the Nobel Peace Prize 2014. Malala, a 17-year-old student and education activist,becomes the youngest-ever Nobel winner.

Combo image: Kailash Satyarthi on twitter / Malala Yousafzai ( AP Photo/ Jessica Rinaldi, File)

Chair of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Thorbjorn Jagland holds photos of children's rights activists Malala Yousafzai of Pakistan, right, and Kailash Satyarthi of India at The Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo after they were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize 2014.

AP Photo/ Vegard Wivestad Grott, Scanpix

The Nobel Prize in Peace is awarded to Indian Kailash Satyarthi and Pakistani Malala Yousafzay.

Nobelprize.org

Malala Yousafzai, center, adjusts her head scarf during a press conference at Zaatari refugee camp near the Syrian border, in Mafraq, Jordan.

AP Photo/ Mohammad Hannon

Actress America Ferrera, left, appears on stage as Pakistani education activist Malala Yousafzai accepts The Women of the Year Fund Honoree Award on stage at the 2013 Glamour Women of the Year Awards in New York.

Photo by Brad Barket/Invision / AP Images

Malala Yousafzai gives a copy of her book to Britain's Queen Elizabeth II during a reception for youth, education and the Commonwealth at Buckingham Palace, London.

AP Photo/ Yui Mok, Pool

Jonathan Yeo’s “Portrait of Yousufzai” at National Portrait Gallery, London

Former US First Lady Laura Bush writes an op-ed in Washington Post on Malala

Angelina Jolie donates $200,000 to the Malala Fund for girl’s education

Popstar Madonna dedicates her song Human Nature to Malala

Time puts her in the list of “100 Most Influential People in the World” in April 2013

Foreign Policy magazine describes Malala as ‘Top 100 Global Thinker’ in November 2012

October 2013 The Queen of England invited her to a reception at Buckingham Palace

October 2013 Malala met US President Barack Obama and his family at the Oval Office

September 2013 Was invited to speak at Harvard University

July 2013 Malala spoke before the United Nations

Malala Yousafzai

AFP (From Outlook 28 October 2013)

FILE - In this file photo taken Friday, September 27, 2013, Malala Yousafzai listens as Harvard President Drew Gilpin Faust introduces her to reporters at Harvard University in Cambridge. European lawmakers have awarded their top human rights prize to Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, who survived a Taliban assassination attempt last year. The European Parliament announced that 16-year-old Malala won the 50,000 euro Sakharov Award.

AP Photo/ Jessica Rinaldi, File

In this undated photo released on Oct. 7, 2013, by the Daily Mirror David Beckham, right, presents a Mirror Pride of Britain Teenager of Courage Award to Malala Yousafzai.

AP Photo/ Philip Coburn, Daily Mirror via PA

Pakistani teenager Malala Yousafzai, who was shot and injured by the Taliban for advocating girls' education, poses for photographers after being awarded the International Children's Peace Prize 2013 during a ceremony in the Hall of Knights in The Hague, Netherlands.

AP Photo/ Peter Dejong

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, left, applauds as the members of the ‘Malala Day’ Youth Assembly wish Malala Yousafzai, center, a happy birthday at United Nations headquarters. Yousafzai, the Pakistani teenager shot by the Taliban for promoting education for girls, celebrated her 16th birthday by addressing the United Nations. The U.N. has declared July 12 "Malala Day," to honor the teen who returned to school in March after medical treatment in Britain for injuries suffered in the October attack.

AP Photo/ Mary Altaffer

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, left, applauds as the members of the ‘Malala Day’ Youth Assembly wishes Malala Yousafzai, center, a happy birthday at the United Nations headquarters. Yousafzai, the Pakistani teenager shot by the Taliban for promoting education for girls, celebrated her 16th birthday on Friday by addressing the United Nations. The U.N. has declared July 12 "Malala Day," to honor the teen who returned to school in March after medical treatment in Britain for injuries suffered in the October attack.

Mary Altaffer/ AP Photo

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl shot in the head by the Taliban, as she attends her first day of school just weeks after being released from hospital. The 15-year-old participated in lessons at the Edgbaston High School for Girls in Birmingham, central England. She survived an assassination attempt by the fundamentalist political group in October last year and underwent hours of surgery in the UK to try and repair the damage caused by a bullet which grazed her brain.

AP Photo/ Malala Press Office

FILE - In this undated file photo provided by Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, England, Malala Yousufzai, the 15-year-old girl who was shot at close range in the head by a Taliban gunman in Pakistan, reads a book as she continues her recovery at the hospital. Malala has been discharged from a British hospital where she had been receiving treatment for nearly four months.

AP Photo/ Queen Elizabeth Hospital, File

In this Jan. 22 2013 photo, fifteen-year-old Malala Yousefzai reads get well cards. The Pakistani girl shot by the Taliban on Oct. 9 2012 has made her first video statement since she was nearly killed saying she is recovering.

AP/PTI

Schoolgirls wear masks of Malala Yousufzai, a 15-year-old girl who was shot at close range in the head by a Taliban gunman in Pakistan, during a campaign to demand better budgetary allocation for health and education of Indian children in New Delhi. Malala has been nominated for this year's Nobel Peace Prize.

AP Photo/Altaf Qadri

This photo made available by Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, England shows Malala Yousufzai saying goodbye as she is discharged from the hospital. Malala was shot in the head by the Taliban for promoting education for girls.

AP Photo/Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham

In this Nov. 15, 2012 photo, a young girl reaches out to greet a Pakistani policeman securing the road outside Kainat Riaz's home in Mingora, Swat Valley, Pakistan. Security was stepped up after Kainat was wounded by the same Taliban gunman who shot Malala Yousufzai and 13-year-old Shazia Ramazan on Oct. 8 on their way home from school.

AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus

A Pakistani child wearing her school uniform hugs a pole outside her home in Mingora, in the Swat Valley, Pakistan. Its been one month since a Taliban gunman shot Malala Yousufzai in the Swat Valley to punish her for advocating girl's education and attacking the Taliban for there opposition to it.

AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus

Pakistani children peek under a curtain that hides the residence inside a home of a poor neighborhood in Mingora, in the Swat Valley, Pakistan. Its been one month since a Taliban gunman shot Malala Yousufzai in the Swat Valley to punish her for advocating girl's education and attacking the Taliban for there opposition to it.

AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus

Sand artist Sudarsan Pattnaik creates a sand sculpture of Pakistani Schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, with a message "Day for Malala" at Birla Art Academy in Kolkata.

PTI Photo

Clay lamps burn next to the poster of 15-year-old Malala Yousufzai, placed by women supporters of Pakistan People's Party during a demonstration in Islamabad, Pakistan. Hundreds of Pakistani students and human right activists are observing a day of appreciation for 15-year-old Pakistani girl who is being treated in Britain after being shot by Taliban.

AP Photo/Anjum Naveed

Pakistani students and teachers hold posters of 15-year-old Malala Yousufzai while they take part in a demonstration in Karachi, Pakistan. Hundreds of Pakistani students and human right activists are observing a day of appreciation for a 15-year-old Pakistani girl who is being treated in Britain after being shot by Taliban.

AP Photo/Faree Khan

A school boy takes photographs as sand artist Sudarsan Pattnaik completes a sculpture portraying 15-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot by the Taliban for speaking out in support of education for women, in Kolkata.

AP Photo/Bikas Das

Malala Yousafzai, a 14-year-old Pakistani activist who was critically injured in an attack by Taliban, at a hospital in Birmingham.

PTI Photo

In this undated handout photo issued by Queen Elizabeth Hospital, in Birmingham, England, Malala Yousufzai in her hospital bed, poses for a photograph, with her father Ziauddin accompanied by her two younger brothers Atal, right and Khushal, centre. Malala Yousufzai is recovering at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, where she was flown for treatment and protection from Taliban threats after she was shot on Oct. 9 in northwestern Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham

In this undated image released by the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust shows Malala Yousufzai, who is recovering in Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, England, after being attacked and shot in the head by Taliban gunmen in Pakistan for advocating education for girls.

AP Photo / University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust

Civil society activists protest the attack on Malala in Islamabad

AFP (From Outlook 29 October 2012)

Students participate in a prayer ceremony in support of and for the recovery of 14-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot in the head by the Taliban for speaking out in support of education for women, at a school in Ahmedabad.

AP Photo/ Ajit Solanki

Pakistani Interior Minister Rehman Malik prays for the recovery of Malala Yousufzai, a 14-year-old Pakistani girl who was shot in the head by the Taliban last week, with Yousufzai's classmates in Mingora, Swat Valley, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Naveed Ali

A Pakistani student holds a picture of 14-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot by the Taliban for speaking out in support of education for women, during a tribute at the Pakistani Embassy in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

AP Photo/ Kamran Jebreili

A supporter of Pakistani political party Muttahida Qaumi Movement, reacts while holding a poster of 14-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot by the Taliban for speaking out in support of education for women, during a rally to condemn the attack in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Shakil Adil

Pakistani children hold candles during a special prayer for the recovery of 14-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot last Tuesday by a Taliban gunman for speaking out in support of education for women, at the Sacred Heart Cathedral Church in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary

Pakistani students hold pictures of 14-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot by the Taliban for speaking out in support of education for women, during a protest condemning the attack, in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Fareed Khan

A woman supporter of a Pakistani religious group 'Minhaj-ul-Quran' holds a poster of 14-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot by the Taliban, during a demonstration in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

A Pakistani boy holds up a picture of 14-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot by the Taliban for speaking out in support of education for women, while he and other schoolchildren attend a protest condemning the attack, in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Fareed Khan

Survivors of the Bhopal Gas disaster forming a human chain to protest against Taliban's shooting of Malala Yousafzai, a 14-year-old Pakistani education activist who was shot by the Taliban for speaking out in support of education for women, in Bhopal.

PTI Photo

School students shout slogans during a protest against Taliban's shooting of Malala Yousafzai, a 14-year-old Pakistani education activist who was shot by the Taliban for speaking out in support of education for women, at Mumbra in Thane, Mumbai.

PTI Photo

Pakistani children pray for the recovery of 14-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot by the Taliban for speaking out in support of education for women, during a candlelight vigil in Karachi, Pakistan. A Pakistani military spokesman says Yousufzai is in "satisfactory" condition but cautions that the next few days will be critical.

AP Photo/ Shakil Adil

Pakistani girls display a poster while sitting at their desk, as their teacher, not shown, talks to them about 14-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot by a Taliban gunman for her role in promoting girls' education in the Swat Valley where she lives, in a school in Islamabad, Pakistan. A Pakistani military spokesman says Yousufzai is in "satisfactory" condition but cautions that the next few days will be critical.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

Pakistani Christians chant slogans during a protest to condemn the attack on a 14-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on Tuesday Oct. 9, 2012 by the Taliban for speaking out in support of education for women, in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary

Malala Yousafzai, the 14-year-old Pakistani schoolgirl who spoke out against Taliban atrocities in their former stronghold of Swat was shot in the head and seriously injured, with the banned outfit saying they had targeted her for her "pro-West" views.

File Photo

Members of Minhaj-ul-Quran Women League, Pakistan hold up pictures of 14-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on Tuesday by the Taliban for speaking out in support of education for women, during a protest to condemn the attack, in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary

Pakistani soldiers carry wounded Pakistani girl, Malala Yousufzai, from a military helicopter to a military hospital in Peshawar, Pakistan. A Taliban gunman walked up to a bus taking children home from school in Pakistan’s volatile Swat Valley and shot and wounded the 14-year-old activist known for championing the education of girls and publicizing atrocities committed by the Taliban.

AP Photo/Inter Services Public Relations Department